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  2. India's Guilty Secret

    Good reviews on Amazon
  3. India's Guilty Secret

    La Noche Triste Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret and the continuing Sikh night of sorrows. Is catastrophe a precursor to genocide or is genocide a spontaneous outburst of violence- essentially a riot? The misnomer of riot to veil genocide is nowhere more evident than in the Indian state’s treatment of the anti-Sikh pogroms of November 1984. Whereas the political-cum-social discourse of the majority community has condensed the event into the misbranded Delhi Riots, for the survivors they were a well-executed genocide. It is axiomatic that justice delayed is justice denied; Pav Singh in his 1984: India’s Guilty Secrethowever goes a step further- on the basis of the survivors’ accounts which he recounts lucidly- Singh contends that November was by no means a riot. It was the culmination of a long drawn out plan to inflict such wounds on the Sikh psyche that the community would never again agitate for civil rights in the Indian union, and assimilate into the greater neo-Hindu political fold (Hindutva). Radical, in scope, 1984 has swiftly dethroned existing analyses of that apocalyptic November and portends change in the global perception of genocide. 1984, from the onset, does not exercise restraint. It is vivid in it’s recounting of the horrors which the Sikhs faced in the aftermath of Prime Minister Indra Gandhi’s assassination. Whereas the mass rapes of Sikh girls and women have often been downplayed in the works of Khushwant Singh and Nayer, Pav Singh elects to focus on how it was employed as a tool to humiliate Sikh males before they were doused in kerosene and set on fire. His almost calm narration of events is enough to render even the most staunch of readers chilled. A fourteen year old boy is forced to witness the gang-rape of his mother; a whole family is hurled out of their residence to witness their daughters being stripped nude, urinated upon and then raped by hordes of mourners (as consecutive political accounts would refer to the culprits). Sikh males are set alight whereas groups of Sikh women are rounded up and held outside Delhi in a semi-concentration camp where they are continually violated. The myth that only Sikh males were targeted is effortlessly effaced by Pav Singh who dedicates an entire chapter to the sexual atrocities suffered by Sikh women. The attitude of doctors, police, and general society towards the victims of rape are also scrutinized. Elements of all three would be instrumental in evicting victims from aid camps and returning them to their prior locii which, in most cases, would be in ruins. The fortunate would escape; the unfortunate would once again fall into the hands of their violators. Another complex facet, of the November pogroms, which has hitherto been obscured is what happened to the Sikh policemen and military personnel in Delhi? 1984 unabashedly substantiates, based on official documentation, how all Sikh serving personnel in Delhi were ordered to take leave in the early hours of November 1st ’84. Most would have had no idea, other than that Indra Gandhi had been gunned down by her Sikh bodyguard duo the night before, of the inferno which awaited them outside their official precincts. Weaponless, they would have walked straight into effective death traps. Military personnel, serving or otherwise, would have fallen prey to armed mobs on the nation’s railway network. Were Sikhs only targeted at train stops? Pav Singh systematically exposes this canard, again relying on official documentation, to evidence that at least forty-six unauthorized train stops were made which allowed assembled mobs to slay all Sikhs on board. For Sikhs, the primacy of Pav Singh’s work hinges on three crucial factors: 1.) It effectively refutes the misnomer of riot. 2.) Whilst paying tribute to the few brave souls who risked life and limb to save Sikhs, it also depicts the callousness of politicians, police and neighbors who betrayed the Sikhs by rendering them defenseless in the face of bloodthirsty mobs. 3.) It refutes the theory of Delhi Riots. Detailed maps provide evidence of sanguinary pogroms executed in Gujrat, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Assam, West Bengal and Agartala. Candid, impenitent and critical- Pav Singh’s 1984 is radical in it’s approach to the November pogroms. Though sections of the Indian media are criticizing Singh, his work should be judged with impartiality; India’s Guilty Secret not only recounts the atrocities inflicted on the Sikhs, but also exposes the political/social cohesion via which the events of November ’84 transpired. The theory of Nanak Jayanti, an alleged rumor which posits that the pogroms were intended for execution on the birth celebrations of Guru Nanak Dev Ji (founder of the Sikh faith) for maximum damage, is also analyzed by Singh. Victim statements are taken into account which depict the conditions outside Punjab in the aftermath of the ill-construed Operation Bluestar. Sikh businesses and residences were often transcribed with a S symbol in the lead-up to November; on the night of 31st October teams were employed to scour several cities in a mission to place this S on all Sikh locations. On the 1st of November the grim significance of this symbol would become transparent as mobs marched on all such identified locations. Nanak Jayanti, caught out by Gandhi’s demise, had been implemented earlier to teach the troublesome Sikhs a bloody lesson. What of the judiciary and the aftermath? Singh, in a brief list, provides an exposition of all the failed commissions which attempted to tackle November ’84 but failed to provide even token justice for the victims. He ends on a poignant note; the survivors of ’84, forgotten by all, are shown as suffering from the trauma of the atrocities inflicted upon them. The state is continually failing in it’s mandate to provide them justice; the social discourse veils their trauma whereas the same ideology which preyed upon them is today gaining ground nationwide. Justice delayed is justice denied, justice denied is justice perverted. https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2018/02/25/la-noche-triste/
  4. India's Guilty Secret

    La Noche Triste Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret and the continuing Sikh night of sorrows. Is catastrophe a precursor to genocide or is genocide a spontaneous outburst of violence- essentially a riot? The misnomer of riot to veil genocide is nowhere more evident than in the Indian state’s treatment of the anti-Sikh pogroms of November 1984. Whereas the political-cum-social discourse of the majority community has condensed the event into the misbranded Delhi Riots, for the survivors they were a well-executed genocide. It is axiomatic that justice delayed is justice denied; Pav Singh in his 1984: India’s Guilty Secrethowever goes a step further- on the basis of the survivors’ accounts which he recounts lucidly- Singh contends that November was by no means a riot. It was the culmination of a long drawn out plan to inflict such wounds on the Sikh psyche that the community would never again agitate for civil rights in the Indian union, and assimilate into the greater neo-Hindu political fold (Hindutva). Radical, in scope, 1984 has swiftly dethroned existing analyses of that apocalyptic November and portends change in the global perception of genocide. 1984, from the onset, does not exercise restraint. It is vivid in it’s recounting of the horrors which the Sikhs faced in the aftermath of Prime Minister Indra Gandhi’s assassination. Whereas the mass rapes of Sikh girls and women have often been downplayed in the works of Khushwant Singh and Nayer, Pav Singh elects to focus on how it was employed as a tool to humiliate Sikh males before they were doused in kerosene and set on fire. His almost calm narration of events is enough to render even the most staunch of readers chilled. A fourteen year old boy is forced to witness the gang-rape of his mother; a whole family is hurled out of their residence to witness their daughters being stripped nude, urinated upon and then raped by hordes of mourners (as consecutive political accounts would refer to the culprits). Sikh males are set alight whereas groups of Sikh women are rounded up and held outside Delhi in a semi-concentration camp where they are continually violated. The myth that only Sikh males were targeted is effortlessly effaced by Pav Singh who dedicates an entire chapter to the sexual atrocities suffered by Sikh women. The attitude of doctors, police, and general society towards the victims of rape are also scrutinized. Elements of all three would be instrumental in evicting victims from aid camps and returning them to their prior locii which, in most cases, would be in ruins. The fortunate would escape; the unfortunate would once again fall into the hands of their violators. Another complex facet, of the November pogroms, which has hitherto been obscured is what happened to the Sikh policemen and military personnel in Delhi? 1984 unabashedly substantiates, based on official documentation, how all Sikh serving personnel in Delhi were ordered to take leave in the early hours of November 1st ’84. Most would have had no idea, other than that Indra Gandhi had been gunned down by her Sikh bodyguard duo the night before, of the inferno which awaited them outside their official precincts. Weaponless, they would have walked straight into effective death traps. Military personnel, serving or otherwise, would have fallen prey to armed mobs on the nation’s railway network. Were Sikhs only targeted at train stops? Pav Singh systematically exposes this canard, again relying on official documentation, to evidence that at least forty-six unauthorized train stops were made which allowed assembled mobs to slay all Sikhs on board. For Sikhs, the primacy of Pav Singh’s work hinges on three crucial factors: 1.) It effectively refutes the misnomer of riot. 2.) Whilst paying tribute to the few brave souls who risked life and limb to save Sikhs, it also depicts the callousness of politicians, police and neighbors who betrayed the Sikhs by rendering them defenseless in the face of bloodthirsty mobs. 3.) It refutes the theory of Delhi Riots. Detailed maps provide evidence of sanguinary pogroms executed in Gujrat, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Assam, West Bengal and Agartala. Candid, impenitent and critical- Pav Singh’s 1984 is radical in it’s approach to the November pogroms. Though sections of the Indian media are criticizing Singh, his work should be judged with impartiality; India’s Guilty Secret not only recounts the atrocities inflicted on the Sikhs, but also exposes the political/social cohesion via which the events of November ’84 transpired. The theory of Nanak Jayanti, an alleged rumor which posits that the pogroms were intended for execution on the birth celebrations of Guru Nanak Dev Ji (founder of the Sikh faith) for maximum damage, is also analyzed by Singh. Victim statements are taken into account which depict the conditions outside Punjab in the aftermath of the ill-construed Operation Bluestar. Sikh businesses and residences were often transcribed with a S symbol in the lead-up to November; on the night of 31st October teams were employed to scour several cities in a mission to place this S on all Sikh locations. On the 1st of November the grim significance of this symbol would become transparent as mobs marched on all such identified locations. Nanak Jayanti, caught out by Gandhi’s demise, had been implemented earlier to teach the troublesome Sikhs a bloody lesson. What of the judiciary and the aftermath? Singh, in a brief list, provides an exposition of all the failed commissions which attempted to tackle November ’84 but failed to provide even token justice for the victims. He ends on a poignant note; the survivors of ’84, forgotten by all, are shown as suffering from the trauma of the atrocities inflicted upon them. The state is continually failing in it’s mandate to provide them justice; the social discourse veils their trauma whereas the same ideology which preyed upon them is today gaining ground nationwide. Justice delayed is justice denied, justice denied is justice perverted. https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2018/02/25/la-noche-triste/
  5. Today
  6. Justin Trudeau visit to India

    It seems some Indians see through Ms. Trudeau's act: Maybe it's just salty right-wing Indians?
  7. Bhai Mokham Singh was the exception. Some Hindus are more kanjoos than others. Gujeratis are those type of Hindus. I heard a Hindu Punjabi Brahmin of all people tell a Gujerati how tight his people were. It was quite an.eye opening experience. I think we as Sikhs don't look how non Sikhs see us. I think that these Gujerati Hindus see us intellictually inferior, big and dumb but cannot figure how come these Sikhs make such a great success of themselves if they are so dumb. They think to themselves , " What is it about the Sardar's religion that makes them this way." They see something in us that we don't and it scares them. We are hated by higher caste hindus because in the caste system they are the rentier castes. They feed off the lower castes like a parasite does. We as Sikhs by an large produce and create our own value and distribute it and create more prosperity all round.we operate outside the caste system, it does nothing for us, there is no need for it. We Sikhs have chardikala spirit and therefore we have more energy to take risks. We don't over -think things like a lot of these highly intellectual Hindus who create paralysis by analysis, we just do. And when we create wealth out of it, it gets right up their nose.
  8. Gurudwara committee

    Akaaaaaaalluh???
  9. Gurudwara committee

    Burn the temples down
  10. emergency advice - Breaking off Engagement

    This doesnt seem like fate to me. It seems like a very well thought out proposition. You are taking the advice of an elder. Who is not just advising u out of experience but also his knowledge as he knew about the family. And your fufur did additional investigative work. I doubt anyone else is lucky enough to get so much to go on to decide. Except there is a new trend to marry ppl from the nanke side to the dadke side. So if someone is from valait, they are not wasting the chance to go bahar on a stranger but someone in the family. And all the info is already known. Edit: Also wanted to add: the sanjog concept should only come into play once one is married. Especially if a couple is having issues, they should think it is sanjog and try not to think of whatifs and regrets and escape. Before the marriage, the decision and choice and blame is all yours. Afterwards, its all sanjog. Like the saying: before marriage keep ur eyes half open and after marriage, keep them half closed.
  11. Some more Home Truths

    Way to skip over all the points I made as usual...Err! LONDON JWAAN made ahem. Don't run off yet! This unmoderated fun is just getting started. Stand and deliver!
  12. Some more Home Truths

    I'll keep my strawman theories to myself and enjoy the show. We should have sold pay per view rights for this.
  13. So Jagmeet gets married ....

    Kind of a tangent but there seems to be a whooole lot of varying degrees of beard trimming going on....that or taking amrit does something to the shape and length of all these beards you see on Guru ji's chela. From my ignorant perspective it seems like that is one of the five k's almost nobody is adhering to. Is there something I'm missing?
  14. Some more Home Truths

    just for everyone knowledge, we are letting this thread run as unmoderated.
  15. Some more Home Truths

    I really, honestly, think the local police and health authority need to have you sectioned under the Mental Health Act London Jawan. You are unbalanced in a very scary way
  16. So Jagmeet gets married ....

    Have you considered that maybe on this one special day, he didn't want to "bike" to his wedding? I thought people were criticizing him for marrying a non-Amritdhari. That is warranted. To begrudge him not having a super-simple wedding is not warranted. I suppose you're also upset that he and his bride wore finery on this one special day instead of khaddar (homespun cotton)? If they wanted to wear khaddar, that's fine, too, but they didn't, and that's fine, too. Compared to what some brides wear, her clothes are extremely conservative: no cleavage, no bare midriff, no arms even. What's the problem? What you're saying would have some import in context. The fact is whenever there's a wedding among our people, rows upon rows of airplanes are filled with people flying out (or in). If that were not the case, then your complaining about Jagmeet Singh's airplane ride would have an impact, but it doesn't. Huh? Then on what basis? Are you serious? What are you even talking about? Did you not see the pictures @jkvlondon posted here? Just so there's no misunderstanding, here's the actual wedding pic (attached). I ask you again: She's wearing a chunni (on her head, not around her as a fashion accessory on her shoulders). What else do you want?
  17. Already did. In one of those many posts you got ownt in and promptly ignored before licking your wounds for a few days, hitting up your fake accounts, then wading back into the fray all foamy mouthed, drunk on your own uhmazing intuhlect, while you look down on us fools too unaware and ignorant to realize we are basking in your glory. If you write some more fake news, hit me up, I'll click the heck out of it so you can continue to afford to save the world with your prius. Shine on you crazy diamond.
  18. Some more Home Truths

    Jagsaw does not use any other id neither any other members IP matches up with his ip.
  19. Sandhu & Ghotra marriage

    Your posts are real. One of two folks are playing around and pretending to be someone. Pls ignore them and report their replies.
  20. None of that veer ji. More like you stoop to his level with insults and the like and then beat the heck out of him in gutter fights. Mainly I was reacting to your assertation that jkv and jagsaw have a lot in common, I don't see them in the same league, ballpark, whatever whatsoever. So I guess I was saying someone could compare you to jagsaw in a way too and you wouldn't like it? Much love though. I see you've not had the pleasure of an American public school education lool. North Korea comes to mind... I'm just saying the misinformation competition is preeety steep in the world. Since we're the same person we can finish this conversation over dinner, lol.
  21. He does quite well. Thank you Bhenji. Just to be clear, probably unnecessarily, I was agreeing with the OP fully to begin with, and using black cultural references because they know about this type of thing all too well in the United States...okay.....cool....so...yeah I can't always tell....on the spectrum or something....ahem.. Thanks... To the op....mmm girl, preach! I didn't actually want a witness though...but thanks .. I think your literal response has broken my overly literal mind. Hah.
  22. The last people to do that successfully with deliberately incorrect propaganda were the nazis...... pot kettle black
  23. Bro Bhai Mokham SIngh ji was Gujarati ... let's just say that they grew up misanney because of Hindu culturals values of make a dollar at any cost. Gandhi so called Bapu was guju and he had zero love for sikhs even to the extent of trying to throw Mud on Guru Pita ji's sacrifices for humanity by calling him a deluded/wayward rebel.
  24. Gurjant and his magic IP address....having a make believe conversation with himself under different names Mods / Admin, will you please look into my IP address and tell everybody on this forum if I have ever used any username other then 'Guest Jagsaw_Singh'. Then will you please do the same for London Jawan / Gurjant Gnostic and reveal the results here for everybody to see ? Unless you have something to hide London Jawan / Gurjant Gnostic, I would have thought you'd be begging the Mods to do the same. No ?
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