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Well Done Sikhs Were In The Headlines

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How is it anything with our people according to the BBC is a "taboo subject"

 

I hear the BBC have another exclusive. 

They have discovered that water is wet.

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5 minutes ago, Ranjeet01 said:

How is it anything with our people according to the BBC is a "taboo subject"

 

I hear the BBC have another exclusive. 

They have discovered that water is wet.

BBC = Media

Media = Lie

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sikh community could boycott the bbc by boycotting the TV licence....

Shall we do a movement on this then? I am sure most of us can stream on demand content online and watch youtube. Might hurt those who require live football and live cricket.

Edited by ipledgeblue

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5 hours ago, ipledgeblue said:

and also we are also funding this BBC news by paying the tv licence fee.

Sometimes I feel like stop paying, but then parents want to watch the sikhi channels on the TV; I can just stream and watch Youtube.

If there was a time when the BBC was meant to be a neutral public broadcaster, it's one thing for the license fee to have been in place to support TV without ads. These days it functions as the voice of the Islamophile liberal establishment. From the perspective of patriotic or traditional Brits, it's against them. From our perspective as Sikhs, it feels free to do anti-Sikh hit pieces.

Additionally, it is devastating local newspapers in Britain by publishing news articles on the website. It was chartered to do broadcasting. It had no right to use the mandatory license fee revenues to elbow into local (or even national) news publishing.

The BBC needs to have its mandatory funding taken away, it's name needs to be changed, and then its stock should be either sold to the public, or simply handed out one share to every British taxpayer.

If Teresa May were to destroy the BBC, she would be guaranteed re-election, but she is too weak to do so.

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4 hours ago, genie said:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-40613289

Heres another article they did last year this time targeting the so called taboo of "sikh women" and the drink problem. I dont know any hindu punjabi or hindu woman that is sober most do indulge in drinking yet no articles about them, strange.

Yeah. 

Although the increasing rate of consumption of alcohol among Punjabi Sikh women shows the superiority of Punjabi culture in this regard. Now Sikhism is the highest of all, but still: Traditionally, only men drank, that too only in private, and usually only when someone was visiting. Against Gurmat, but still within some kind of limit. What you didn't have is the mother of the children drunk out of her senses. Thanks, modern feminism and "equality".

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4 hours ago, GurjantGnostic said:

It's also a problem in every community. 

But grooming gangs are "asian" 

Ah, yes, very perceptive!

The Islamophile media never fail to use the cop-out term "Asian" to avoid saying "Muslim" or "Pakistani Muslim", but here, they openly use the term "Punjabi Sikh".

Why??

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I think this article is 20 -30 years too late. Yes back in the 1960s, 70s, 80s and even 90s a lot of Sikh men who came to the UK from India drank excessively. This was due to them working in physically demanding jobs in factories, foundries and that too working excessive hours. They used drinking as a coping mechanism - to deal with the physical pain and lack of social life. With the excess drinking came the other problems like wife and child beating.

However the current generation (those born in the UK) do not go these same extremes, sure they might get hammered at a wedding or go on a heavy drinking session on the weekend (like every other ethnicity in the UK) but they are not doing it every day like the first immigrants to the UK did and they're not coming home to beat their wife and kids.

It's like with forced marriages, sure it may still go on in the Sikh community at a very slight amount but nowhere near the level it was back in the 70s, 80s and 90s, yet you will still get articles stating that it is a big problem in the Sikh community. It doesn't help that the president of the Black Sisters organisation in Southall keeps on going on about her own forced marriage ordeal that was back in the 1980s.

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