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Big_Tera

Buddhism And Hinduism: The Similarities And Differences

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Buddhists and Hindus are most welcome to join Sikhi (the ultimate Dharmic faith). We already have a lot in common.

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Having trouble finding it, but I will share when I do.

I read buddhist writings, in a creation story,  where they actually eluded to a single all powerful being that they are incapable of describing. Since they are incapable they do not even try. 

I'll see if I can find it. 

Well something along these lines. 

https://blogs.transparent.com/thai/creation-according-to-buddha/

The, most likely Japanese, reference I read took it a step further to to say it all came from the indescribable One. 

Edited by GurjantGnostic
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2 hours ago, Dsinghdp said:

Buddhists and Hindus are most welcome to join Sikhi (the ultimate Dharmic faith). We already have a lot in common.

Why should they join. We Sikhs believe every path is right dont we. even agnostic. As everyone is free to belive in what they like. 

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6 hours ago, Big_Tera said:

Why should they join. We Sikhs believe every path is right dont we. even agnostic. As everyone is free to belive in what they like. 

lol'ed. 

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On 03/02/2018 at 7:15 PM, Big_Tera said:

Why should they join. We Sikhs believe every path is right dont we. even agnostic. As everyone is free to belive in what they like. 

it was an invite not an order ...chill. If you are on to a good thing is it not good manners to let others know so they can find out if they like it too?

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On 2/3/2018 at 11:15 AM, Big_Tera said:

We Sikhs believe every path is right

Source?

As far as Bani is concerned, all humans are equal before the one, all "religions" are not. Sikhi isnt a "relgion" its just the universal truth, some of which is contained in "religions", and there is differently more in some than others. 

On 2/3/2018 at 11:15 AM, Big_Tera said:

everyone is free to belive in what they like. 

Being free to believe what you like, and believing that "every path is right" are two completely different things. 

The Guru criticized the Hindus beliefs so much, but he still sacrificed himself for their freedom to believe what they want, even if its not inline with Sikhi.  

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Quote

Buddhism And Hinduism: The Similarities And Differences

 

The dharam of Buddha is similar to Sikhi in which both teach to kill the ego, however it is divergent in the sense that Sikhi heavily emphasizes the simran on the ONE. while the same concept isnt so clear in the modern interpretations of the Budha dharam. 

 

In regards to "Hindu-ism", (correct term Sanatana Dharma), its a blanket term used to describe an ocean of different south Asian originated beliefs. This is why when people compare Sikhi to Sanatana Dharma it really depends on which aspect of it they are talking about. Unlike Sikhi, Sanatana Dharma isnt a unified belief system. Hinduism" is so broad that you cant even really define it. It would be like saying all the abrehamic religions were one. 

Edited by TheeTurbanator
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20 minutes ago, TheeTurbanator said:

Sikhi isnt a "relgion" its just the universal truth, some of which is contained in "religions", and there is differently more in some than others. 

Just curious, how do you define religion?

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Just now, BhForce said:

Just curious, how do you define religion?

"Religion" is defined in a very western, abrehamic context, and the term "Dharma" just like many other terms such as ੴ  have no adequate English counterparts. 

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24 minutes ago, TheeTurbanator said:

"Religion" is defined in a very western, abrehamic context, and the term "Dharma" just like many other terms such as ੴ  have no adequate English counterparts. 

Yeah, but what is your definition, so we can have a conversation.

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28 minutes ago, TheeTurbanator said:

"Religion" is defined in a very western, abrehamic context, and the term "Dharma" just like many other terms such as ੴ  have no adequate English counterparts. 

Also, it would be interesting to know how you define "dharma".

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2 minutes ago, BhForce said:

Yeah, but what is your definition, so we can have a conversation.

I define and understand the western term "relgion" (which has no roots in the eastern lexicon) as something that is inherently dualistic, belief based, and contains rituals.The concept of "god" as understood through the else of most or all "religions" is very different from the universal and timeless concept of ੴ   (which wasnt created in 1469)

 

Quote

Also, it would be interesting to know how you define "dharma".

 

I define and understand the eastern term "Dharam" is the timeless truth, and isnt specific to any time period, nor does it have multiple prophets or have rituals. I understand Dharma to be generally all encompassing, while "relgion" isnt. Dharma applies to all, and is a fundamental truth, while religion is often limited to one creed, people, or even species.

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I am skeptical of the neat division of religions in to "religion" vs. "dharma", but it all depends on your definitions, and am open to new information.

 

40 minutes ago, TheeTurbanator said:

I define and understand the western term "relgion" (which has no roots in the eastern lexicon) as something that is inherently dualistic, belief based, and contains rituals

Hmm, sounds like Hinduism.

Dualistic? How about the Hindu school of Samkhya?

"Samkhya is dualistic realism. It is dualistic because it advocates two ultimate realities: Prakriti, matter and Purusha, self (spirit). "

http://indianphilosophy.50webs.com/samkhya.htm

Samkhya is strongly dualist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samkhya

Contains rituals? Sounds like the Vedas.

Vedic Rituals and Sacrifices From Srauta Sastras

1 hour ago, TheeTurbanator said:

I define and understand the eastern term "Dharam" is the timeless truth, and isnt specific to any time period, nor does it have multiple prophets or have rituals.

Timeless, so from the beginning of humanity? Prior to humans, there can't have been such a thing as human "dharam" because animals are already automatically in their "dharam". Anyway, Muslims believe that Islam dates from the first man, Adam:

"Adam (peace be upon him) was the first of the Prophets, as it says in the hadeeth narrated by Ibn Hibbaan in his Saheeh" https://islamqa.info/en/10551

So is that timeless enough?

Multiple prophets? Like Sri Ram and Krishan ji, or the other of the 24 incarnations of Vishnu?

Or the 10 Guru Sahibs?

Dharam doesn't have rituals? So Sanatam Dharam doesn't have rituals? Or it isn't a dharam? Or every Hindu that circumambulates a fire to get married is a-dharmic?

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2 hours ago, TheeTurbanator said:

"Religion" is defined in a very western, abrehamic context, and the term "Dharma" just like many other terms such as ੴ  have no adequate English counterparts. 

Would you define "mazhab" as the same as "religion"? Or different to or the same as "dharam"?

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