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MrDoaba

So I took a Ethnicity DNA Test...

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to mata ji_/\_DNA in Sikhi denotes DHAN NAAM AMRIT...so, in my opinion..in angrezi DNA is Do Not Agree..with findings, as surely our blood contains kurr of environment soil, wind, water atey fire..that Guru Sahib created, put together to mold our sareer, before He blew Naam Life in us, so we live in Naam laha award pride vs kurr beings kaal destiny blood type false pride ji:rofl

 

Edited by sitokaur
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There is always this assumption that somehow migration was from West to East.  Migration went the other way too.

Furthermore, for example it is assumed that red hair is Celtic.  However, where did the Celts come from? They went from Asia into Europe.

There was a red haired race known as Tocharians that lived in North West China. 

Also, from studies have shown that until about 7000 years ago that Homo Sapiens that entered into Europe were brown skinned and had blue eyes.

 

 

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The cradle of where humans came from is in east africa. If there is such a thing as adam and eve area.

We evolved here from. Infact the very first life on earth was fish and insects. Over millions of years we evolvee in the human form from fish and othe animals forms. 

Today we most resemble our ape like ancesstors. However we did not ditectly evolve from apes. But we shared a common ancesstor. 

All this is actually written in our holy sciptures. Such as reincarnation and how we have escaped the endless rebirth from animals/insects to man. Long before scientist discovered this through evolotion. 

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Actually humanity might have originated in Europe according to recent research. Though this doesn't disprove evolution or anything in Puratan scriptures.

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the true is punjabi women were 4q  by persians greeks arabs turks muslims british hindus , what has changed

 

 

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17 hours ago, joker said:

the true is punjabi women were 4q  by persians greeks arabs turks muslims british hindus , what has changed

 

 

errr kindly keep your filthy mouth to yourself ...this is forum that respects women  not spread misogynistic vitriol

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I think it is very interesting from historical point of view. Seeing all these different ethnicities, and mapping when/how they arrived in Punjab. I suppose we could summarize a lot of common folks from Persian controlled areas were travelling and settling in Punjab, during the early Persian invasions. 

Edited by KhoonKaBadlaKhoon
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17 hours ago, joker said:

the true is punjabi women were 4q  by persians greeks arabs turks muslims british hindus , what has changed

 

 

ਇਦਾਂ ਦੇ ਜ਼ੁਬਾਨ ਦੇ ਨਾਲ ਤਾਂ ਤੂ ਗਸ਼ਤੀ ਦਾ ਬੱਚਾ ਹੋਵੇਂ

 

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39 minutes ago, KhoonKaBadlaKhoon said:

I think it is very interesting from historical point of view. Seeing all these different ethnicities, and mapping when/how they arrived in Punjab. I suppose we could summarize a lot of common folks from Persian controlled areas were travelling and settling in Punjab, during the early Persian invasions. 

Do you think we should pay more attention to our Persian heritage given Guru Gobind Singh Ji's affinity for the Persian language and culture?

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On 12/11/2017 at 1:56 PM, Kira said:

Actually humanity might have originated in Europe according to recent research. Though this doesn't disprove evolution or anything in Puratan scriptures.

I read that too. Would be quite interesting, especially for all the social justice warriors who proudly exclaim "We all come from Africa!" 😂Although I personally do not care where we came from. 

23 hours ago, joker said:

the true is punjabi women were 4q  by persians greeks arabs turks muslims british hindus , what has changed

 

 

You're an <banned word filter activated>. 

4 hours ago, MrDoaba said:

Do you think we should pay more attention to our Persian heritage given Guru Gobind Singh Ji's affinity for the Persian language and culture?

I wouldn't say we have a Persian heritage. They mixed into Punjabi society, and I don't believe they left any lasting marks, aside from language. 

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6 minutes ago, KhoonKaBadlaKhoon said:

I wouldn't say we have a Persian heritage. They mixed into Punjabi society, and I don't believe they left any lasting marks, aside from language. 

Good point. It would be amazing to see a revival of Farsi in our quam though - some oldies rave about it, and I wish I had the himmat to learn such a complex language.

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1 hour ago, MrDoaba said:

Good point. It would be amazing to see a revival of Farsi in our quam though - some oldies rave about it, and I wish I had the himmat to learn such a complex language.

It's not a complex language, bro. Arabic is a complex language. The grammar is complex. You have different forms for singular, plural, 3 or more people, whether they are present in front of you or not, etc. Pronunciation is difficult for us because there are sounds which we are not familiar with. There are fewer words with which we as Punjabis are familiar.

Persian, by contrast, is arguably simpler than Punjabi, because, e.g., it doesn't have grammatical gender. The sounds are easier for us to pronounce (there are only a handful that don't exist in desi Punjabi, but they do exist in urban Punjabi or Urdu, so you've probably already heard the sounds). Many of the words also exist in Punjabi, so that means there's a foothold for us to hang on to while figuring out the meaning of a sentence.

Learning Persian for us is like crossing a lake with a paddle-boat. Learning Arabic for us is like trying to cross the Pacific Ocean with a life jacket from the bottom of your airplane seat.

Oh, and Arabic is a non-Indo-European language. Persian is Indo-European (like Punjabi, of course).

Edited by BhForce
Sentence about Indo-European
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The claim that we are Persian and then we proceed to call it Farsi which from what I understand is the Arab pronounciation for Persian because there is no "P" in the Arab alphabet. 

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8 hours ago, BhForce said:

It's not a complex language, bro. Arabic is a complex language. The grammar is complex. You have different forms for singular, plural, 3 or more people, whether they are present in front of you or not, etc. Pronunciation is difficult for us because there are sounds which we are not familiar with. There are fewer words with which we as Punjabis are familiar.

Persian, by contrast, is arguably simpler than Punjabi, because, e.g., it doesn't have grammatical gender. The sounds are easier for us to pronounce (there are only a handful that don't exist in desi Punjabi, but they do exist in urban Punjabi or Urdu, so you've probably already heard the sounds). Many of the words also exist in Punjabi, so that means there's a foothold for us to hang on to while figuring out the meaning of a sentence.

Learning Persian for us is like crossing a lake with a paddle-boat. Learning Arabic for us is like trying to cross the Pacific Ocean with a life jacket from the bottom of your airplane seat.

Oh, and Arabic is a non-Indo-European language. Persian is Indo-European (like Punjabi, of course).

My bad, I was referring to the differences between Written Persian and Colloquial Persian bro, which makes the language as a whole appear complex. I'm familiar with the fact that Persian is fairly easy to become fluent in for speakers of other Indo-European languages. I've met quite a few native Persian speakers and was surprised at the rate they are able to pick up Urdu/Hindi.

Similarly, I was surprised at the extent of influence Persian has had on Punjabi. The majority of us know that we borrow a considerable amount of vocabulary from it, but in our day to day speech we tend to forget - after hearing Shudh Hindi speakers (and watching the likes of Ramayan and Chandragupta Maurya) I was shocked at how little I understood, especially as someone who claims to be fluent in Hindi. What I'm actually fluent in is neither Hindi nor Urdu, nor Hindustani for that matter, rather it's a combination of them. I always make it a point to learn the equivalent Sanskrit word though as it increases my knowledge of Punjabi and makes it easier to understand Gurbani.

Take for example this simple phrase I came across quite awhile back which translates as "one language isn't enough":

yek zaban kafi nist

Literally: ek zubaan kaafi nahi

A Punjabi speaker would be able to easily comprehend the former - and although you wouldn't say it as such in a Punjabi conversation, one could get away with saying the latter and undoubtedly get their point across.

On a side note, being able to read Urdu and Shahmukhi would be somewhat worthwhile in my opinion. I have a whole stack of books in both which belonged to my Grandfather, and I don't have it in me to get rid of them. Along with the books I have plenty of letters witten on those blue airmail envelopes from the '70s and '80s - who knows what they say. Not only that, we also have loads of old zamine papers written in these scripts too, albeit patwari's have notoriously vile handwriting.

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