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Have you ever felt some spiritual awakening like state while naam japp /simran ?

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On this forum itself, some people have said that when meditating via naam japp or simran, they felt like their body became really light-weight and floating mid air or consciousness leaving the body or hearing of strange musical sounds.

Some have reported presence of a sweet fluid in mouth .

Whats the mystical experience you ever had ? What time it happened ? What paath / naam japp were you doing at that time ?

please share your experiences.

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These experiences can also happen as an after effect of having engaged in samadhi. People who are able to experience these while awake are lucky of course. They do not necessarily happen during meditation.  However most happen at amrit vela. You can get feedback from God at any time even when you are not actively praying.

Edited by sikhni777
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VJKK VJKF

One must be very very blessed to get these experiences. If they happen after a long period of time then it means that one has done a lot of naam (bani or simran) to clean their past sins and then finally get the clean slate these blessings come. It's the aim for everyone to clear all their past sins and finally get to the stage where we can experience maharaj. One needs to be very very blessed for these experiences so just keep walking towards maharaj and increasing bani and naam and see what happens. Hope that helps.

Vaheguru Ji.

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