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Singh2017

Is there any difference between Naam Simran and Reading Bani?

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VJKK VJKF

Daas has a question and Maharaj kirpa, Waheguru's sangat can help. I have missed out on doing a lot of simran over past few days but Maharaj kirpa I have been replacing that with a lot of paath. Does this paath take the place of that simran that I haven't been doing? I've heard from many people that there is no difference but I haven't had a certain answer of no from anywhere. Can anyone shed some light on this please?

Vaheguru Ji. 

 

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23 minutes ago, monatosingh said:

Another similar topic was posted a while back:

 

VJKK VJKF

I read that but I didn't really get a clear answer. This was caused me the confusion. 

Vaheguru Ji.

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2 hours ago, Singh2017 said:

VJKK VJKF

Daas has a question and Maharaj kirpa, Waheguru's sangat can help. I have missed out on doing a lot of simran over past few days but Maharaj kirpa I have been replacing that with a lot of paath. Does this paath take the place of that simran that I haven't been doing? I've heard from many people that there is no difference but I haven't had a certain answer of no from anywhere. Can anyone shed some light on this please?

Vaheguru Ji. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Singh2017 said:

VJKK VJKF

I read that but I didn't really get a clear answer. This was caused me the confusion. 

Vaheguru Ji.

WJKK WJKF

In my opinion then, naam simran and bani are both different. Bani is required (for all). In amritvela, you only do 1/2 of your amritvela if you only read bani. At least 1 hour of simran is required for the other 1/2.

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8 hours ago, monatosingh said:

WJKK WJKF

In my opinion then, naam simran and bani are both different. Bani is required (for all). In amritvela, you only do 1/2 of your amritvela if you only read bani. At least 1 hour of simran is required for the other 1/2.

VJKK VJKF

I totally respect your opportunity veerji. But I was thinking if I do my nitnem and then do let's say 10 Japji Sahibs instead of that simran - is there any difference? I personally see it as the same. Just daas' opinion but I don't know anything so I could be very wrong. 

Vaheguru Ji.

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24 minutes ago, Singh2017 said:

VJKK VJKF

I totally respect your opportunity veerji. But I was thinking if I do my nitnem and then do let's say 10 Japji Sahibs instead of that simran - is there any difference? I personally see it as the same. Just daas' opinion but I don't know anything so I could be very wrong. 

Vaheguru Ji.

Did you listen to the first video I put on? Giani ji talk about what you are asking. 

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10 hours ago, Singh2017 said:

VJKK VJKF

Daas has a question and Maharaj kirpa, Waheguru's sangat can help. I have missed out on doing a lot of simran over past few days but Maharaj kirpa I have been replacing that with a lot of paath. Does this paath take the place of that simran that I haven't been doing? I've heard from many people that there is no difference but I haven't had a certain answer of no from anywhere. Can anyone shed some light on this please?

Vaheguru Ji. 

 

May I ask how missed out on doing simran and replaced it with a lot of paath? Did you miss out simran on a number of days and then do lots of paath in one go? Do specifically make time to do paath and simran or do it while completing your day to day tasks?

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5 minutes ago, simran345 said:

Did you listen to the first video I put on? Giani ji talk about what you are asking. 

VJKK VJKF 

Yes penji - its a really beautiful video. Answered my question I think. 

Vaheguru Ji

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1 minute ago, MrDoaba said:

May I ask how missed out on doing simran and replaced it with a lot of paath? Did you miss out simran on a number of days and then do lots of paath in one go? Do specifically make time to do paath and simran or do it while completing your day to day tasks?

VJKK VJKF 

Yes - so I recently have been lacking with simran so now I'm just doing many hours of paath instead and aim to continue that even after I catch up with the hours of simran lost. 

Vaheguru Ji. 

 

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1 minute ago, Singh2017 said:

VJKK VJKF 

Yes - so I recently have been lacking with simran so now I'm just doing many hours of paath instead and aim to continue that even after I catch up with the hours of simran lost. 

Vaheguru Ji. 

 

Is there something in particular preventing you from doing simran when you would normally do it?

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Just now, MrDoaba said:

Is there something in particular preventing you from doing simran when you would normally do it?

VJKK VJKF 

I've tried really hard and long to try and connect with simran but I don't really feel any connection but reading bani makes me feel a bit more. 

Vaheguru Ji.

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I see. I think it's quite common to feel this way. Doing more paath to make up for the lost simran is fine in theory, usually it's the other way around - people doing more simran to make up for lost paath. If you're having trouble concentrating try breaking your simran up into segments, I'm sure 10mins of simran given your full concentration is worth more than one hour without.

Also take into consideration how essential simran is - Gurbani talks about Naam, the infinite greatness of it, and that without it there is nothing. Through Gurbani the value of Naam Simran will become apparent and you will feel that connection. You're already well on your on way with this.

Naam is the essence of Gurbani and Gurbani is the essence of Naam.

 

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Reading the  Bani and doing Simran are both interrelated. Just as cooking food, and then eating it. 

But if we cook, and then do not eat, how can our hunger for the Truth(Wahiguru) ever be satisfied?

The Bani is nothing, but the mahanta, the praises of Wahiguru and Naam as His essence, His real form.

In order to become one with Him,one has to dissolve oneself, one has to cease existing, then only He is, and we are not.

And this brother, can only happen when we engage in His bhakti only through His Simran.

That is why the Bani says: Jin Har japeeya se Har hoeeya. 

This is the only objective of us as human beings : Wahiguru Akal Purukh, through His contemplation, His Dhyan in our chit.

Futher on the bani also says: Prabh kay simran dargah manni

In His Court/Darbar, His Simran is accepted, as per means of true devotion, sewa, bhakti.

Sat Sree Akal.

 

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