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Is it really Sikh, Sikhi, Sikhism vs Hindu, Hinduism and it's beliefs?

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21 hours ago, S1ngh said:

I understand your concern. However, we are different and we should refrain ourself from generalization. Not all fingers are equal. There are good and bad folks in every community. 

Thankyou for extending this benefit of doubt. 

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Guest Saddened Hindu ji

We are sad that you had to go through that experience. But read Guru granth sahib for yourself. You won't find any hatred 

Also it takes two hands to clap

Taali ek haath se nai bajti

My Hindu "friend" who is a hardcore hindutva fan have insulted my sikh faith numerous times. And once even wiped his gulabjamun syrup hand on my turban

Your RSS hindutva bodies routinely spread lies about sikhism with aim to undermine it. Your radical hindutva outfits are wreaking havoc in punjab and calling shots. 

You can't blame sikhs only. We trusted india nd hindoos, but were backstabbed numerous times

Don't expect an apologist attitude from us. You aren't getting any. If you don't feel like going to gurudwara, no one is forcing you to. 

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You first introspect the kind of crrap that happens from your hindu side before blaming it at sikhs entirely 

Also you have no right to say sikhism is wrong, when your own religion is corrupted to no end by varna system and brahmins. 

You ppl destroyed  buddhist and jain monasteries too. Now want to do same with Sikhism 

Edited by AjeetSinghPunjabi
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9 hours ago, harsharan000 said:

Nowadays, when we see our own youngsters and not so youngsters, going away from Sikhee, let us ask ourselves, is it not because of the negative impluses of their minds, due to whatever reasons that maybe?

How is talking about 1984 going away from Sikhi? It's not only Sikhs that were affected by it. Stop making this into something it's not. The facts are there, ask any one that lost their loved ones then how it's affected them. 

Edited by simran345
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@Siddhartha  you don't seem uneducated or not intelligent enough to have done something a parent would have done if they felt a child was talking in an inappropriate way. You are painting all Sikhs with the same brush of "badness" from an experience that you had. 

Firstly, nobody else reading your post was there, but you and your daughter were. But still you expect everybody to agree to the "badness" of what happened, when we've got no idea of how and what had been said by a child. We can only take your word for it, but why should we? We don't know what the exact words were said do we? 

If you had any care for Sikhi or for the sangat also, wouldn't it have been wiser to approach the Gurdwara committee? Why didn't you do that, instead of extending it into something that it's not. 

And if you don't like that Gurdwara, then go elsewhere, to a different Gurdwara. It's like your saying all Gurdwaras are discriminating. 

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18 hours ago, Siddhartha said:

Thankyou for extending this benefit of doubt. 

Would you be happy if Sikhs were wiped out/become Hindus?

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1 hour ago, Siddhartha said:

How can you deduce from all the posts here so far, the words I used and how I articulated, that I'm painting all the Sikhs with the same brush. 

When you've this as the title "Is it really Sikh, Sikhi, Sikhism vs Hindu, Hinduism and it's beliefs?", what else is somebody suppose to think?

As this is what you started off with :

Guest Saddened Hindu   
Guest Saddened Hindu

"I'm here because I now feel that either the teachings, teachers, interpretations or the followers of Sikhism themselves are in the wrong or being guided with malacious intent."

"Are Sikhs somehow being taught this disrespect through the family unit, gurudwaras, community congregations, media? "

That's why, as you have portrayed it in your posts. So, maybe you do need to re-read what you've written  .

And for the record, I don't discriminate against Hindus. My posts are plain and simple and I haven't wrote anything that you would be upset by. I have Hindu friends and I'd say the same thing to them if they wrote that and they wouldn't get offended. 

You should also understand without any evidence, how can I understand the whole situation? 

In my opinion, if you felt that you were discriminated against in any way you should have approached the Gurdwara committee. Isn't that the best thing to do? If you had a bad experience in a store or another public establishment, you would approach the manager or whoever is in charge. So that's why I'm not understanding, when you are so educated, why didn't you consider doing something about it? You also mentioned you talking to the child afterwards with his father there also. Did you talk about your concerns to him? Isn't this the normal thing to do, if somebody feels hurt/offended by something ? Or don't people do that nomore? I don't think I've wrote anything wrong, but only asked why you didn't consider doing something that you would have got some answers from, rather than coming online and starting a thread with that title. I'm not sure what you will achieve from here, an online apology for people who we don't know or don't know the whole situation as nobody was there. I'm not saying you are lieing or it didn't happen. 

I'm saying if you are so confident like you say, why couldn't you have arranged to discuss it with those involved. Do you see how your title comes across for somebody reading it? Maybe if you had titled it as "Bad experience at Gurdwara" or something similar, then I wouldn't have come to the conclusions I did. 

 

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