Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest Haridas

neophyte mistakes

Recommended Posts

Guest Haridas

What are some typical neophyte mistakes?  The errors that people, youth etc make when trying to learn about Sikhi?  Here are a few:

1. Looking for a sense of community/belonging instead of looking for truth/God.

2. Too much emphasis on history rather than spiritual practice (historical interest is fine, but don't neglect Naam Simran etc).

3. Too much involvement in politics or social problems, rather then spiritual interests.

4. Thinking too much about groups are doing, not enough about their individual journey.

5. Being waylaid by controversies and arguments, rather then concentrating on spiritual progress.

6.  Thinking in terms of concepts instead of practising virtues.

7.  picking and choosing from religious texts, and rejecting things that they think do not make sense.  this is narrow mindedness.

8. worrying about 'threats to sikhi' (as if there were any), rather than practicising sikhi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Asikh
On 05/09/2017 at 10:28 AM, Guest Haridas said:

What are some typical neophyte mistakes?  The errors that people, youth etc make when trying to learn about Sikhi?  Here are a few:

1. Looking for a sense of community/belonging instead of looking for truth/God.

2. Too much emphasis on history rather than spiritual practice (historical interest is fine, but don't neglect Naam Simran etc).

3. Too much involvement in politics or social problems, rather then spiritual interests.

4. Thinking too much about groups are doing, not enough about their individual journey.

5. Being waylaid by controversies and arguments, rather then concentrating on spiritual progress.

6.  Thinking in terms of concepts instead of practising virtues.

7.  picking and choosing from religious texts, and rejecting things that they think do not make sense.  this is narrow mindedness.

8. worrying about 'threats to sikhi' (as if there were any), rather than practicising sikhi.

Great post!!!

But ppl do these things cuz they want to or cuz they are easier. 

So how to counteract that? Like qt sikh camps they would always tell us to do simran and bhagti and all we wanted to listen to were sakhis about bhoota and history 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Haridas

Hi Asikh,

thank you for your response.

I think the simple answer is by creating awareness.  That was my intention with the post.   For example someone reads this post and realises they might be doing these things, or at least ask themselves if are they making such unknowing mistakes.  (By the way, I think I made these mistakes at some point, so I do not mean it in a 'holier than thou' or condescending manner!).

I do not think Sikh Camps are a good idea, infact I think they may be harmful because they draw people for the wrong reasons, they are based on (i.e. created out of) fear and insecurity (no offence to anyone) and also they may draw people for the wrong reasons (like the ones listed above, e.g. wanting some kind social belonging), and they may promote a kind of frightened cultish or mindless conformist mindset (again no offence intended).  Another thing is, people may suffer bullying at these places by unpleasant people, and come to associate those unpleasant feelings with religion.

For example, if you want to become Khalsa, it should be purely with serving Guruji in mind and not appeasing some social group.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Sri Guru Gobind Singh ji didn't discriminate between satguru as their is only one same satguru for every yug.  He told us to praise, worship, meditate on the one and only satguru.  He wrote about the 24 incarnations of Vishnu and he corrected what happened actually to the 24 incarnations.  If Krishna and Vishnu were satguru, Sri Guru Gobind Singh ji would have said it in his writing about them.  Instead he wrote to say I don't praise them or think of them, I hold Mahakaal ( which translates into Vaheguru in this context as he is the destroyer of all) praise only in my mind.
    • people need to stop having WWA matches with rehits imo. 
    • This whole jathabandi nonsense has had a negative impact on Sikhi, and I wish we would do away with it.
    •   Jagsaw, I am very surprised that you consider the movement of Sikhs out of areas with substantial Sikh populations to be "progress". First of all, I thought you lived in Southall?  Or perhaps another part of West London?  If so, I find it odd that you consider it a positive thing not to live in areas such as the one that you yourself live in. Second of all, I think you are greatly overlooking just how much of a positive impact that living in an area with a substantial Sikh population can have when it comes to preserving our religion and culture.  It is foolish to discount the importance of children being able to grow up in a "community", with Gurdwaras and Khalsa Schools nearby, with peers who come from the same background, who practice the same things, speak the same language.  I credit the "ghettoization" of the Sikh community in the UK for preserving the Sikh religion and Punjabi culture despite several generations having elapsed.  The vast majority of Sikhs in the UK trace their roots in the UK to the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s.  Yet somehow, young Sikhs in the UK appear to be more religious and interested in Sikh issues than the Sikh youth in Canada or America.  Somehow, young Sikhs in the UK seem to have almost as much exposure to Punjabi language and culture as their American and Canadian counterparts whose families arrived from India in the 1980s and 1990s. In America, the vast majority of Sikhs live in cities and neighborhoods with effectively no Sikh presence.  That has an impact.  It leads to young Sikhs who grow up with little knowledge of, connection to, or regard for their religion and culture.  It leads to interfaith marriages that effectively wipe out Sikhi from families.  It cripples our ability to safeguard our way of life.  I very much doubt that young Sikhs in America in the year 2060, whose families arrived in the 1990s, will speak fluent Punjabi, go to the gurdwara, engage with their religion, and connect to Sikh political issues the way that a surprisingly large number of young Sikhs in the UK do today. 
    •   I think Malwa gets more credit for keeping Sikhi alive than it deserves.  Malwa is bigger than Majha and Doaba combined (in both land and population).  So the contributions its people have made to Sikhi in recent times is a bit distorted (I say "recent times", because before 1947, Majha and Malwa were comparable in terms of land and Sikh population).  Malwa is so much bigger that it dominates.   It is notable that even though Majha has a much smaller population than Malwa, the vast majority of young Sikhs who took up arms in the 1980s were from Majha. The Majha district (especially what is now Amritsar District and Tarn Taran District) have historically been the strongholds of Sikhi.  However, this region was the hardest hit during the dark times of the 1980s and 1990s, and it is perhaps the hardest hit today when it comes to the drug epidemic.  Sadly, the Sikh youth in Majha seem to have discarded their kesh, do not follow rehat, and have in many cases succumbed to drugs.
×