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How ‘cut Surd’ has stealthily gained currency among Indian Sikhs

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Not trying to be judgemental of monay , but definitely worth a read

If any researcher wants to study identity, I recommend s/he choose Sikhs as subject.

The name Sikh is derived from the Sanskrit word for disciple or learner. Guru Nanak revealed God as a formless, divine intelligence shared by all faiths and agnostics alike. In his world-view, hierarchies of caste, gender, class and religions were delusions.

Guru Gobind Singh, the last of the living gurus, also described God as identity-less. 

"Chakkar chehun arr barrn jaat ar paat nehan jeh; roop rang arr rekh bhekh kou keh na skat keh," he wrote, meaning God, or the supreme intelligence, bears no outward features - physical form, colour, dress, symbols or lineage.

Rationalists then wonder why followers of this philosophy are required to wear their faith on their sleeve if the spiritual force they believe in itself is symbol-less.

Let me attempt an answer to this question. The turbaned Sikh identity is no imitation of God in the first place. Guru Nanak's God is inimitable.

Secondly, identity, in a wider perspective, is never a static representation of orthodoxy. On the contrary, it evokes a sense of connection with history and ideals.

The Khalsa identity, which Guru Gobind Singh in 1699 institutionalised and of which uncut hair wrapped in a turban is the most striking aspect, is a focal point for the Sikhs to navigate something that unites them in the public sphere.

It's not a certificate of virtue. Definitely not.

In fact, in one of his writings incorporated in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, Kabir, the great mystical weaver-poet, declared: "Kabir preet ikk sio keeay aan dubidha jaye; bhavaiy laambey kes kar, bhavaiy gharar muddaye (duality and alienation depart when you love God. It's then immaterial whether you have long hair or a shaven head: Kabir)."

The turbaned Sikh identity, therefore, is not a stamp of spirituality but a corollary of a revolutionary journey from Guru Nanak to the Khalsa of Guru Gobind Singh. It helps Sikhs connect with their history, more so when reading it is not so common.

But the same Sikh identity remains too glaring for the world outside to accept it readily. If you wear it, you cannot hide it. And when you can't hide it, be prepared for some reaction, especially when intolerance mounts. It happened in 1984. It happened 250 years ago during Islamist invasions.

turban_081217052933.jpgIf you wear it, you cannot hide it. Photo: Reuters

And it still happens - from strange looks on the streets of New York or a full-blown assault by some supremacist in some part of the United States.

Let's admit that this identity is not a fashion although some of us have been trying to promote it on the ramp for a couple of decades now.

But the Sikh identity is rapidly declining in the heartland of the faith, Punjab.

Young Sikhs in the region are finding the turban a bother. They feel smarter without it than with a six-metre of cloth wound around their heads.

I am not sure there's any data, but it's widely believed this rejection of the religious headgear gained momentum in the early 1990s. Many factors contributed to it: alleged police excesses during the Punjab unrest, India's sudden economic boom and growing urge among the youth to merge with the rest of the world, mainly under diasporic influence.

Earlier, the phenomenon was pronounced largely among college-going Sikh students. They would forego of their "Sikh pride" in order to be more modern.

But now, the young breed doesn't wait that long. Aided by their parents, many children from the community, especially in rural Punjab, appear to be getting haircuts before 10-12.

Around 2,40,000 results show up when you Google "cut Surd". That's how potential clean-shaven Sikh grooms are being advertised on matrimonial sites, with additional qualifiers like "handsome" and "smart".

It seems an identifiable Sikh disappears in Punjab every day.

But far-off, in Europe and North America, the turban is undergoing a stunning revival.

Diasporic Sikhs, many of whom can be credited or blamed for setting the "cut-Surd" trend back home, are re-embracing their identity rapidly.

Perhaps, they have realised the futility of shedding it to play to the white man's gallery. They appear to have understood cultural cross-dressing is no gateway to raising their racial profile.

People of colour, the Chinese, Mongols, Vietnamese and so forth, earned a place in the western world not by painting themselves white or by undergoing plastic surgery.

Sikhs also worked hard as much as others did, but many of them compromised their turbans to please their foreign hosts.

Not anymore. They now know they can stand out boldly, as a powerful lobby, in multinational, multicultural milieus with - and not without - their visible tradition.

But what about Punjab and India, the cradle of the religion? "cut-Surd" advertisements reflect high levels of acceptance at home of identity-less Sikhs.

It's a deep cut on the faith's umbilical cord. And that's not cool, man.

http://www.dailyo.in/variety/sikhism-turban-guru-nanak-intolerance-indian-diaspora-punjab-cut-surd/story/1/18926.html

 

 

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3 hours ago, AjeetSinghPunjabi said:

Not trying to be judgemental of monay , but definitely worth a read

If any researcher wants to study identity, I recommend s/he choose Sikhs as subject.

The name Sikh is derived from the Sanskrit word for disciple or learner. Guru Nanak revealed God as a formless, divine intelligence shared by all faiths and agnostics alike. In his world-view, hierarchies of caste, gender, class and religions were delusions.

Guru Gobind Singh, the last of the living gurus, also described God as identity-less. 

"Chakkar chehun arr barrn jaat ar paat nehan jeh; roop rang arr rekh bhekh kou keh na skat keh," he wrote, meaning God, or the supreme intelligence, bears no outward features - physical form, colour, dress, symbols or lineage.

Rationalists then wonder why followers of this philosophy are required to wear their faith on their sleeve if the spiritual force they believe in itself is symbol-less.

Let me attempt an answer to this question. The turbaned Sikh identity is no imitation of God in the first place. Guru Nanak's God is inimitable.

Secondly, identity, in a wider perspective, is never a static representation of orthodoxy. On the contrary, it evokes a sense of connection with history and ideals.

The Khalsa identity, which Guru Gobind Singh in 1699 institutionalised and of which uncut hair wrapped in a turban is the most striking aspect, is a focal point for the Sikhs to navigate something that unites them in the public sphere.

It's not a certificate of virtue. Definitely not.

In fact, in one of his writings incorporated in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, Kabir, the great mystical weaver-poet, declared: "Kabir preet ikk sio keeay aan dubidha jaye; bhavaiy laambey kes kar, bhavaiy gharar muddaye (duality and alienation depart when you love God. It's then immaterial whether you have long hair or a shaven head: Kabir)."

The turbaned Sikh identity, therefore, is not a stamp of spirituality but a corollary of a revolutionary journey from Guru Nanak to the Khalsa of Guru Gobind Singh. It helps Sikhs connect with their history, more so when reading it is not so common.

But the same Sikh identity remains too glaring for the world outside to accept it readily. If you wear it, you cannot hide it. And when you can't hide it, be prepared for some reaction, especially when intolerance mounts. It happened in 1984. It happened 250 years ago during Islamist invasions.

turban_081217052933.jpgIf you wear it, you cannot hide it. Photo: Reuters

And it still happens - from strange looks on the streets of New York or a full-blown assault by some supremacist in some part of the United States.

Let's admit that this identity is not a fashion although some of us have been trying to promote it on the ramp for a couple of decades now.

But the Sikh identity is rapidly declining in the heartland of the faith, Punjab.

Young Sikhs in the region are finding the turban a bother. They feel smarter without it than with a six-metre of cloth wound around their heads.

I am not sure there's any data, but it's widely believed this rejection of the religious headgear gained momentum in the early 1990s. Many factors contributed to it: alleged police excesses during the Punjab unrest, India's sudden economic boom and growing urge among the youth to merge with the rest of the world, mainly under diasporic influence.

Earlier, the phenomenon was pronounced largely among college-going Sikh students. They would forego of their "Sikh pride" in order to be more modern.

But now, the young breed doesn't wait that long. Aided by their parents, many children from the community, especially in rural Punjab, appear to be getting haircuts before 10-12.

Around 2,40,000 results show up when you Google "cut Surd". That's how potential clean-shaven Sikh grooms are being advertised on matrimonial sites, with additional qualifiers like "handsome" and "smart".

It seems an identifiable Sikh disappears in Punjab every day.

But far-off, in Europe and North America, the turban is undergoing a stunning revival.

Diasporic Sikhs, many of whom can be credited or blamed for setting the "cut-Surd" trend back home, are re-embracing their identity rapidly.

Perhaps, they have realised the futility of shedding it to play to the white man's gallery. They appear to have understood cultural cross-dressing is no gateway to raising their racial profile.

People of colour, the Chinese, Mongols, Vietnamese and so forth, earned a place in the western world not by painting themselves white or by undergoing plastic surgery.

Sikhs also worked hard as much as others did, but many of them compromised their turbans to please their foreign hosts.

Not anymore. They now know they can stand out boldly, as a powerful lobby, in multinational, multicultural milieus with - and not without - their visible tradition.

But what about Punjab and India, the cradle of the religion? "cut-Surd" advertisements reflect high levels of acceptance at home of identity-less Sikhs.

It's a deep cut on the faith's umbilical cord. And that's not cool, man.

http://www.dailyo.in/variety/sikhism-turban-guru-nanak-intolerance-indian-diaspora-punjab-cut-surd/story/1/18926.html

 

 

'A corollary...' is this guy an <banned word filter activated> or something?

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5 hours ago, 13Mirch said:

'A corollary...' is this guy an <banned word filter activated> or something?

Hes known to write similar trash in his other pieces related to Sikhism 

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    • They were loyal as far as it suited them but in the meanwhile they was having secret communications with the British agents. For example the prime minister of sarkar-e-khalsa was a dogra hindu punjabi and the general gulab singh was also a hindu dogra. We all know how that turned out. The generals two who betrayed the Sikhs in the anglo-sikh wars were of brahmin hindu stock who hid themselves in hindu mandirs like a typical cowardly hindu brahmin after the surviving angry Sikh troops came looking for them after the battles, I think they were even lynched by the Sikhs after finding them from what i read from historical books. The white european generals and adventurist mercenaries who joined the Sikh Khalsa army were also traitors who even though they hated the British due to the American independence and  Napoleonic wars, they still had racial loyalty to other whites than non-white powers. So they would often have secret communications with the invading white british supremacists in order to do over those they were serving at the time. Maharajah ranjit singh's govt and empire's downfall was that he trusted non-sikhs in key positions of power. He didn't purge or force conversion to those who wanted to be in his inner circle. Too many people with competing interests and loyalties then betrayed the mother land punjab and his empire because they saw better opportunities with the foreign invaders. Just like in present days we see the same thing in politics of punjab. They do each other over rather than unite and fight the common foreign occupying power (centralised Indian govt in delhi). The house of pataila has always been a kingdom of sellouts and betrayers of the Sikh panth. The founder of patiala kingdom was a vessal state in all but name of afghan invader abdali when in the mean time the Sikhs of other kingdoms and land of punjab was busy fighting and dying to save the faith and their families of the onslaught. And just as his ancestor betrayed the kaum so did the grandfather of captain amrinder singh who became a freemason to help the british against Sikh empire/punjab. And so did his father and now captain amrinder singh is also a gaddar inheriting the long legacy of traitorous behaviour and mindset by putting his lot in and siding with Indian congress party in order to have some power in the indian establishment.
    • Some pangtis of what Guruji says about family:   ਮੰਨੈ ਪਾਵਹਿ ਮੋਖੁ ਦੁਆਰੁ ॥ 
      मंनै पावहि मोखु दुआरु ॥ 
      Mannai pāvahi mokẖ ḏu▫ār. 
      The obeyer of the Lord's dictates obtains the door of salvation. 
        ਮੰਨੈ ਪਰਵਾਰੈ ਸਾਧਾਰੁ ॥ 
      मंनै परवारै साधारु ॥ 
      Mannai parvārai sāḏẖār. 
      The obeyer of the Lord's dictates reforms his kith and kin. 
        ਮੰਨੈ ਤਰੈ ਤਾਰੇ ਗੁਰੁ ਸਿਖ ॥ 
      मंनै तरै तारे गुरु सिख ॥ 
      Mannai ṯarai ṯāre gur sikẖ. 
      The obeyer of the Lord's fiat saves himself and saves the Sikhs of the Guru. 
        ਮੰਨੈ ਨਾਨਕ ਭਵਹਿ ਨ ਭਿਖ ॥ 
      मंनै नानक भवहि न भिख ॥ 
      Mannai Nānak bẖavahi na bẖikẖ. 
      The obeyer of the Lord's fiat goes not begging. 
        ਐਸਾ ਨਾਮੁ ਨਿਰੰਜਨੁ ਹੋਇ ॥ 
      ऐसा नामु निरंजनु होइ ॥ 
      Aisā nām niranjan ho▫e. 
      Such is the stainless Name of God. 
        ਜੇ ਕੋ ਮੰਨਿ ਜਾਣੈ ਮਨਿ ਕੋਇ ॥੧੫॥ 
      जे को मंनि जाणै मनि कोइ ॥१५॥ 
      Je ko man jāṇai man ko▫e. ||15|| 
      If some one puts faith in the Lord's Name, he shall then, understand it within his mind.  SGGS JI Ang 3 🙏🏻 Dhan Guru Nanak Dev ji      ਗ੍ਰਿਸਤਿ ਕੁਟੰਬਿ ਪਲੇਟਿਆ ਕਦੇ ਹਰਖੁ ਕਦੇ ਸੋਗੁ ॥ 
      ग्रिसति कुट्मबि पलेटिआ कदे हरखु कदे सोगु ॥ 
      Garisaṯ kutamb paleti▫ā kaḏe harakẖ kaḏe sog. 
      He who is wrapped up in household and family and sometimes feels joy and sometimes sorrow; 
        ਗਉਣੁ ਕਰੇ ਚਹੁ ਕੁੰਟ ਕਾ ਘੜੀ ਨ ਬੈਸਣੁ ਸੋਇ ॥ 
      गउणु करे चहु कुंट का घड़ी न बैसणु सोइ ॥ 
      Ga▫oṇ kare cẖahu kunt kā gẖaṛī na baisaṇ so▫e. 
      and wanders in four directions and cannot sit or sleep even for a moment; 
        ਚਿਤਿ ਆਵੈ ਓਸੁ ਪਾਰਬ੍ਰਹਮੁ ਤਨੁ ਮਨੁ ਸੀਤਲੁ ਹੋਇ ॥੩॥ 
      चिति आवै ओसु पारब्रहमु तनु मनु सीतलु होइ ॥३॥ 
      Cẖiṯ āvai os pārbarahm ṯan man sīṯal ho▫e. ||3|| 
      Were he to reflect over the Supreme Lord, his body and soul shall be cooled (rest at peace).  SGGS Ji Ang 70 🙏🏻 Dhan Guru Arjan Dev ji   ਨਾਮੁ ਧਨੁ ਨਾਮੁ ਸੁਖ ਰਾਜਾ ਨਾਮੁ ਕੁਟੰਬ ਸਹਾਈ ॥ 
      नामु धनु नामु सुख राजा नामु कुट्मब सहाई ॥ 
      Nām ḏẖan nām sukẖ rājā nām kutamb sahā▫ī. 
      The Name is my wealth, the Name my royal peace and the Name my family and helper. SGGS ji Ang 497 🙏🏻 Dhan Guru Arjan Dev ji   There are many pangtis, do a search and see what Guruji says.
    • Agree, it’s the actions of the person that makes somebody negative. There was a video I saw a while ago, on this, but can’t find it now. A person can also change from a negative one to a good one. Like they say, Every Saint has a past, and every sinner a future.     
    • Although such abuses do happen now and then it is not a wide spread problem especially in Sikh community its more a hindu and muslim centric problem as they rely on dowry in their religious scriptures and culturally its been going on for thousands of years. The abuses are a very tiny percentage there's probably more  domestic abuse cases in Australian white privileged gay relationships than all the ethnic minorities put together. This article smacks of white privilege and covert racist dog whistling against ehtnic/religious minority communities the sad thing is asians/indains are too lazy to reply back to such white washed propaganda. If minorities really wanted to expose the white western cultural disgusting practices and norms such as wide spread abuse from alcoholism. Domestic violence prevalent in white communities in homosexual couples too. The amount of single parent families in white households. The outrageous neglect of elderly by white communities... then list would be endless and the whites would be outraged enough to try and defend their negative cultural practices and counter bash minority communities. It's long over due that time ethnic/religious community especially ours started to defend ourselves in the mainstream mass media produce counter pieces and counter propaganda against our accusers. otherwise this overt racism will just keep on happening. And next time you are looked at negatively for jobs, or in the street attacked cos of your faith or appearance it is because of such articles helped contribute to it.
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