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How would you teach your sons and daughters to be proud sikhs?

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Seeing how young Sikhs of today are surrounded by so many different ideologies, religions, sexualities, etc in a very confusing world of competing idea's how would you raise your kids to learn and be proud Sikhs?

Even if they do not take amrit or keep their unshorn hair, how would you instill that loyalty to sikhi and pride in them?

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31 minutes ago, superkaur said:

Seeing how young Sikhs of today are surrounded by so many different ideologies, religions, sexualities, etc in a very confusing world of competing idea's how would you raise your kids to learn and be proud Sikhs?

Even if they do not take amrit or keep their unshorn hair, how would you instill that loyalty to sikhi and pride in them?

Bheinji there are many ways -

1. Teach them Gurmukhi 

2. Take them to Gurdwara especially when there's kids program 

3. Demonstate how to do Seva & ask them to assist

4. Gurmat & Sikhi Camps are also good way to learn

5. Learning Kirtan & how to play musical instruments is also recommended 

6. Host regular family n friends get togethers so that you & them feel a sense of belonging to Sikh community 

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Good suggestions! O:) however

What if they surrounded by bad sangat and influences? we can all see the filth on mainstream media and social media and it must be worse in secondary/high school.

E.g,,,,, when your kid asks you why should I be a Sikh instead of an atheist or christian or muslim,etc. What will you tell them? What is the best reason to give?

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43 minutes ago, superkaur said:

Good suggestions! O:) however

What if they surrounded by bad sangat and influences? we can all see the filth on mainstream media and social media and it must be worse in secondary/high school.

E.g,,,,, when your kid asks you why should I be a Sikh instead of an atheist or christian or muslim,etc. What will you tell them? What is the best reason to give?

Bheinji if you have a choice put them in a school where majority of pupils come from middle class background.

Priorities of educated working class is very different from those who aren't.

Don't short change when it comes to good school & environment.

If possible opt for new age Sikh Schools like

UK

http://www.atamacademy.com

http://www.thebritishsikhschool.com/

Canada

http://www.sikhacademy.ca

http://www.kmschool.org

USA

http://www.sacvalleycharter.org

This will help overcome all your concerns.

Edited by singhbj singh

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Guest Jacfsing2
1 hour ago, superkaur said:

Good suggestions! O:) however

What if they surrounded by bad sangat and influences? we can all see the filth on mainstream media and social media and it must be worse in secondary/high school.

E.g,,,,, when your kid asks you why should I be a Sikh instead of an atheist or christian or muslim,etc. What will you tell them? What is the best reason to give?

I've been surrounded by some of the Sangat that's not been the best, and all I can say is you have to teach your kids from a young age, (not as a teenager, but when they are growing-up) to not give into peer pressure. The best reason for being a Sikh is that through Sikhi alone can one be free of suffering of 8.4 million lives, if that isn't good advice, tell them: "In putran Ki sees Par vaar diye sut chaar Chaar Muye To Kya Hua Jeevat Kayi Hazaar", Tell them the meaning to be Guru Sahib's children.

You have absolutely no control over who your child interacts with in school, (anyone who says otherwise is lying), but what you can do is instill values that are inseparable from their being and allow them to combat the challenges of a manmukhi world.

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Because if English language being mostly used in U.K. and countries, such as USA, Canada, Australia,etc, take them to Basics of Sikhi, Simran.info, Sikhi2Inspire, Nanak Naam sessions when they are at the age they can start understanding Sikhi so that they don't sidetrack or forget it. 

 

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The best way to teach your kids is first to be a very good example. Practice what you preach first before you actually preach it. Kids copy more by observing you. Read sakhis and share little tuks of Gurbani and their meanings with them. It takes just seconds to plant great thinking into young minds. It takes less than 5 seconds to tell a youngster about the meaning of a word of gurbani. 

Be ready for all questions and answer them as truthfully as possible. You dont want them to find answers elsewhere and then they will doubt you. Guide them and tell them the meanings of sakhis or shabads which you heard at your Guradwara trip. Get them religious books and better still read them together. 

Work towards increasing your knowledge of sikhi as well so that you have new things to share with them and keep them interested. Always encourage them to talk out their doubts and do not put them down ... like how could your mind think that.... you need to pray more often etc. 

Let them know you are proud of them as they respect their religion. Remind them Guru Ji is happy with them too as they are walking on the path of sikhi. Remind them of the blessings they receive. Perform ardaas together and listen to path as a family where possible. 

Read sikh history and try to learn as much possible and share... with others as well... your friends, relatives etc so you have a good network around for your kids too. 

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Good question. I don't think there's a "one size fits all" approach. It depends on the child. You've got to be smart enough to know the nature of the child in question before you start trying to fill their heads with things that are a struggle for most adults to process. Some kids are very receptive and have a natural inclination to all things religious and spiritual, whilst others are mentally and otherwise quite fidgety. 

I suppose it's also important to consider whether you're trying to mould a genuinely aware spiritual being, or a loyal footsoldier who says and does it all without any depth or sincerity. 

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Guest Jacfsing2
2 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

I suppose it's also important to consider whether you're trying to mould a genuinely aware spiritual being, or a loyal footsoldier who says and does it all without any depth or sincerity. 

I suppose the worst-type of children are the ones that act one way and innocent around their parents, but act completely different in public. (But again I wouldn't really know much on why they do this, if they cared about representing their parents in a positive light).

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20 minutes ago, Jacfsing2 said:

I suppose the worst-type of children are the ones that act one way and innocent around their parents, but act completely different in public. (But again I wouldn't really know much on why they do this, if they cared about representing their parents in a positive light).

I'd say a good number of apnay turn out like this. To me it serves as a warning of excessively micro-managing your offspring. If you've given them no choice but to behave in a certain way around you - when you are not around, their own proclivities and suppressed desires will manifest - parents are usually the last ones to find out. 

Edited by dallysingh101

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On ‎13‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 3:21 PM, superkaur said:

Seeing how young Sikhs of today are surrounded by so many different ideologies, religions, sexualities, etc in a very confusing world of competing idea's how would you raise your kids to learn and be proud Sikhs?

Even if they do not take amrit or keep their unshorn hair, how would you instill that loyalty to sikhi and pride in them?

Sister, it's actually simple:

1) Buy them illustrated books about the lives of the Sikh gurus and shaheeds (this is what brought me closer to Sikhi in the mid 90s).

2) Google the nearest Gatka or Shastar vidya school and get them enrolled (training in a martial used by their Sikh ancestors will make them feel proud).

3) Get them to watch Basics of Sikhi on YouTube, especially videos featuring Bhai Jagraj Singh.

4) Introduce them to websites with a full English translation of Guru Granth Sahib ji and get them to read random parts or do a word search. Every ang is oozing with knowledge, wisdom and inspiration. Thanks to these websites, access to Gurbani has never been easier. Once the kids discover what's actually written inside Guru Granth Sahib ji, they'll be amazed and want more.

5) Google before-and-after images of monay Sikhs becoming Amritdhari Sikhs (to show them it happens. They'll find it inspiring). 

I guarantee you any youth who follows the 5 points above will develop a hunger for Sikhi.

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