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AjeetSinghPunjabi

Punjabi / Sikh woman goes to her own wedding with just her sweat shorts as lowers

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What might come as shock to sikh / punjabi wedding , a woman is seen with her turbaned groom husband , in only sweat shorts. 

On top she's wearing the usual choli , dupatta, but the lehenga is missing !! lol 

http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/everything-social/this-brides-wedding-ensemble-manages-to-set-twitter-on-fire/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=TOI

 

KI JALOOS KADYA ! 

 

DBGGgEcUQAARXxM.jpg

Edited by AjeetSinghPunjabi

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honestly he looks like a muslla and she looks like a tramp ...I'm sorry but I would have told go and put clothes on before coming here  if you want to get married

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Guest Jacfsing2

The original color people wore for their Anand Karaj was blue, (red was actually a color Sikhs would never wear). In recent years less and less Satkar has been coming for our ceremonies. Even devout Christians wouldn't dress in such ways to their weddings. If it was a Non-Sikh wedding, then I wouldn't be surprised, the bigger question is why they'd be dressing in such ways to a throne room of the greatest king, (Dhan Dhan Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji)? 

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true he looks like a muslim with that beard . That girl looks hindu though. 

People just want attention and come in headlines. Just look at all the crazy way people do weddings thesedays , deep in the ocean , high in the sky . They think its one time event, might as well make it grand lol. and also free media coverage.

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13 hours ago, Jacfsing2 said:

If it was a Non-Sikh wedding, then I wouldn't be surprised, the bigger question is why they'd be dressing in such ways to a throne room of the greatest king, (Dhan Dhan Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji)? 

We are actually making a lot of assumptions, such as that this was a Sikh wedding (performed in a Gurdwara or at least before prakash for Guru Granth Sahib). And then the second assumption is that if it was a Sikh wedding, that she was attired like this during the wedding itself, as opposed to taking pictures outside (before or after).

If, however, all those assumptions are true, this is quite deplorable.

But also, and very importantly, I ask: Where is it written in Guru Granth Sahib that women can't wear shorts in the Guru's Darbar?

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18 minutes ago, BhForce said:

But also, and very importantly, I ask: Where is it written in Guru Granth Sahib that women can't wear shorts in the Guru's Darbar?

This needs to become part of the Terms & Conditions for this site. Actually, submit it to the SGPC for inclusion for whenever they decide to update and revise maryada. 

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Just now, MisterrSingh said:

This needs to become part of the Terms & Conditions for this site. Actually, submit it to the SGPC for inclusion for whenever they decide to update and revise maryada. 

Just to understand, are you saying that women can't/shouldn't wear shorts in Guru Sahib's darbar, or can and should?

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Just now, BhForce said:

Just to understand, are you saying that women can't/shouldn't wear shorts in Guru Sahib's darbar, or can and should?

Stop living in the Middle Ages. I can discern what you're inferring. She cannot and will not be oppressed by your chauvinistic, third-world, religious patriarchal mindset. Do you have a problem with Nike gym shorts? 

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18 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Stop living in the Middle Ages. I can discern what you're inferring. She cannot and will not be oppressed by your chauvinistic, third-world, religious patriarchal mindset. Do you have a problem with Nike gym shorts? 

men also don't wear shorts in gurudwara ! so why should women ? I get ur being sarcastic lol

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4 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

She cannot and will not be oppressed by your chauvinistic, third-world, religious patriarchal mindset. Do you have a problem with Nike gym shorts? 

1. For some definitions of chauvinistic, third-world, religious, and patriarchal, Guru Sahiban were all of those. Are those bad things, in your view?

Chauvinistic meaning promoting your own nation. Since Guru Nanak Dev ji founded the Nirmal Panth, one might assume that Guru Sahib sees it as superior. If it's not, then there's a fault in Guru Nanak ji. Third-world meaning not America and its allies. Our homeland was not poor before it was plundered by the British. It was rich. Religious (does it need definition?) and patriarchal meaning descent through the male line. Our Gurus were all religious and patriarchal. In fact, they are all male! Perhaps God is patriarchal and sexist, in choosing the Gurus.

2. I don't have a problem with gym shorts, or Nike's gym shorts in particular, but I see no reason to change the existing Gurdwara maryada, whether written or unwritten.

3. Is there anything not interdicted Guru Granth Sahib that you would have banned? I.e., do you believe that you can do anything not specifically banned (in so many words) in Guru Granth Sahib?

4. If she is cannot be forced to wear a pajami in Guru's Darbar, is there anything to force her to wear a choli (women's top) or equivalent? And on what basis? Is this basis to be found in Guru Granth Sahib?

5. If she is not Amritdhari, she has no reason to have to wear a kachera, correct? So why does she need to wear Nike gym shorts? No reason at all, correct?

I await your response to all questions.

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26 minutes ago, BhForce said:

1. For some definitions of chauvinistic, third-world, religious, and patriarchal, Guru Sahiban were all of those. Are those bad things, in your view?

Chauvinistic meaning promoting your own nation. Since Guru Nanak Dev ji founded the Nirmal Panth, one might assume that Guru Sahib sees it as superior. If it's not, then there's a fault in Guru Nanak ji. Third-world meaning not America and its allies. Our homeland was not poor before it was plundered by the British. It was rich. Religious (does it need definition?) and patriarchal meaning descent through the male line. Our Gurus were all religious and patriarchal. In fact, they are all male! Perhaps God is patriarchal and sexist, in choosing the Gurus.

2. I don't have a problem with gym shorts, or Nike's gym shorts in particular, but I see no reason to change the existing Gurdwara maryada, whether written or unwritten.

3. Is there anything not interdicted Guru Granth Sahib that you would have banned? I.e., do you believe that you can do anything not specifically banned (in so many words) in Guru Granth Sahib?

4. If she is cannot be forced to wear a pajami in Guru's Darbar, is there anything to force her to wear a choli (women's top) or equivalent? And on what basis? Is this basis to be found in Guru Granth Sahib?

5. If she is not Amritdhari, she has no reason to have to wear a kachera, correct? So why does she need to wear Nike gym shorts? No reason at all, correct?

I await your response to all questions.

I was being sarcastic. Your original post gave me a belly laugh. I've not had one of those in quite a while.

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I have big doubts that it is a genuine pic. The upper half match perfectly so some natching has been done down there.

If it was genuine then the nickers would be red not Black! !!! Indian ladies love color match.

Edited by sikhni777
adding info
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29 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:
  Hide contents

I was being sarcastic. Your original post gave me a belly laugh. I've not had one of those in quite a while.

OK, don't I feel stupid. You had me going there.

You might want to used a /sarc tag next time, because on the Internet, it's extremely hard to discern sarcasm:

Quote

Poe's law is an adage of Internet culture that states that, without a clear indicator of the author's intent, it is impossible to create a parody of extreme views so obviously exaggerated that it cannot be mistaken by some readers or viewers as a sincere expression of the parodied views.[1][2][3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe's_law

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8 minutes ago, BhForce said:

OK, don't I feel stupid. You had me going there.

You might want to used a /sarc tag next time, because on the Internet, it's extremely hard to discern sarcasm:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe's_law

Heh, I assumed my unique brand of humour was well-known around these parts. It's not a problem, brother. My fault. 

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you are having a laugh aren't you ...this tramp wouldn't dress like that to go to the queen's house  because she'd know you have a level of decorum for such places. Simply put she does not respect or understand Our Guru ji's Darbar is the Darbar of the King of Kings

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