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UK General Election: Jeremy Corbyn Or Theresa May Who Do You Think Will Win?

34 posts in this topic

My bet is on Jeremy and Labour winning,

The Tory manifesto has nothing positive for the electorate to vote for plus Theresa may/ conservatives have proved to be weak on islamic terrorism, mass muslim immigration and policing and security.

I also think Theresa is trying to lose the election as she doesn't want to deal with the huge challenge of brexiting from the EU ahead of her.

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Who do I think will win? The Tories.

Which party do I want to see win? Neither. 

I'm actually warming to Corbyn. The frankly disgraceful way the PLP in Labour have tried to undermine him from day one is nothing short of treason. 

Edit: Treason, in a manner of speaking, not actual treason.

Edited by MisterrSingh

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I dont want either party to win either, both have policies that can have a huge negative impact on the UK. However out of the two bad options I personally think Jeremy's labour party is the better purely based on his more positive investment in services manifesto rather than the negative one of cuts offered by theresa may.

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You asked who would win, then you went to say who should win.

Anyway, disregarding policy details, the one thing that stands out to me in regards to Theresa May is the sense that she is dedicated to putting the interests of Britain first. By contrast, Jeremy Corbyn seems not to be dedicated to any such notion, as he has to in his mind balance Britain's interests with the rest of the EU and of the rest of the world, too.

Theresa May seems to me to be determined to get the best deal for Britain in her negotiations with the EU. As such she has repeatedly stated that no deal would be better than a bad deal, meaning she is prepared to walk away. (No deal would mean repealing the European Communities Act, leading to EU law being unenforceable in the UK, and trade happening under World Trage Organization rules--a few percent as opposed to zero percent now, and perhaps EU property located in the UK seized by the UK.)

Now, as anyone who has ever done a negotiation knows, you have to be prepared to walk away, and make the other party know that. Imagine what sort of negotiation you would have for a new house if you announced in advance to the selling party that no matter what, you are going to get a deal. No matter if the seller increases the price by 10%, 20%, 50%, even 100%, you will accept anything and everything, but you will absolutely complete the deal. This would be sheer nonsense and absolute lunacy. Yet, this is exactly what Jeremy Corbyn has announced in relation to the EU negotiations. By the way, the EU has indeed increased its demand for an incredible $50 billion divorce bill to an utterly mad $100 billion.

Looking at the way Theresa May has the will to do right by her people makes me wonder why we never get leaders to do right by us. My sense of our leaders is that they will capitulate to anything and everything just to "get a deal", and they are not prepared to walk away. How wonderful it would be if our leaders would state that they are going to enter negotiations with Haryana and Rajasthan for payment for Punjab water flowing into their states. And if they're unable to secure a deal, they will "walk away", i.e., stop the flow of water.

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Democracy is a system proven to fail.

Guroo Gobind Singh jee has already given us the perfect method to manage a society and that is through the system of panj rehatvaan gursikhs to be our form of government.

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6 hours ago, AjaipalSingh said:

Democracy is a system proven to fail.

Guroo Gobind Singh jee has already given us the perfect method to manage a society and that is through the system of panj rehatvaan gursikhs to be our form of government.

Umm, what? 

We were talking about the UK elections, and you come back and say Punj Piyare is the system of governance for us? How does that relate to the subject matter of this thread?

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How is such a topic about elections related to Saadh Sangath and Sikhi, the purpose of the creation of such a website?

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56 minutes ago, AjaipalSingh said:

How is such a topic about elections related to Saadh Sangath and Sikhi, the purpose of the creation of such a website?

Dear brother,

I sincerely hope you are not a follower of only the first five Gurus. Are you?

The Sixth Guru Hargobind ji taught us the need of both Miri and Piri. Piri (spirituality) comes first, but you also need Miri (temporal power). Saadh Sangat may be said to be related to Piri, but Sikhi encompasses both Miri and Piri.

Guru Gobind Singh ji told us to study politics (52 hukums).

Guru Gobind Singh ji supported Bahadur Shah in his quest to become Emperor of the Islamic state of India. Would you have asked Guru Sahib what the assistance to Bahadur Shah had to do this Guru ji's responsibilties as Guru? Or the relation to Saadh Sangat and Sikhi?

I hope to read answers to all my questions.

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1 hour ago, AjaipalSingh said:

How is such a topic about elections related to Saadh Sangath and Sikhi, the purpose of the creation of such a website?

Why are you diverting from the topic?

Since your a newbie you would be wise to understand this forum allows topics that are relevant and has impact on Sikhs to be discussed.

Anyone with even half a braincell would realise the relevance of UK general elections have on British Sikhs especially since theres a few Sikh candidates standing in the election and manifesto policies of the 2 major parties will directly impact on the lives of British Sikhs.

 

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PS: I'm a Canadian and I don't care for British elections. Just found this interesting. 

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Hung Parliament. 

Good news Tan Dhesi and Preet Kaur both elected.

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I was perplexed by May's sudden pronouncement to crack down on the internet as one of the first things she spoke about after the London Bridge attack. It was a rather peculiar sentiment immediately after a terrorist attack, particularly when there was very little indication the internet played any majorly significant role in radicalising the individuals in question. It was almost as if she was waiting for the right moment to unleash that policy.

Aside from that, the Tory manifesto was harsh on traditional Tory demographics. Labour are a party in disarray despite the results. This election will, ironically, increase divisions between the Corbyn camp and the PLP faction instead of soothe relations. The neo-liberal party members won't be content until Corbyn and his fan club are banished to the fringes once again.

In conclusion, no matter who wins these and future elections, we lose.

Edited by MisterrSingh

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Coalition Government time.

A lot of youngsters voted for Corbyn enticed by the pledge to scrap tuition fees.

Ironic since it was a Labour government that introduced them in the first place.

I wonder if he was voted in whether he really would have followed through on that.

May will be a sitting duck PM. There is going to be no confidence in her. Every decision will be undermined. 

There are rumours that there is going to be an Autumn election and maybe another referendum.

 

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2 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

May will be a sitting duck PM. There is going to be no confidence in her. Every decision will be undermined. 

There are rumours that there is going to be an Autumn election and maybe another referendum.

 

October, apparently. 

I must say, the recent terror attacks seem to have worked against the government. I know correlation isn't causation, but it can't be a coincidence they went from a predicted landslide to a dodgy coalition with the DUP.

I'm actually pleased for Corbyn the man. It is somewhat of a vindication of his way of doing things. Although Labour as a political entity can go to hell. Both theirs and the Tories' brand of neo-liberalism will decimate this country for the vast majority. The rich and the elite minority will always be spared the worst of it.

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11 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

October, apparently. 

I must say, the recent terror attacks seem to have worked against the government. I know correlation isn't causation, but it can't be a coincidence they went from a predicted landslide to a dodgy coalition with the DUP.

I'm actually pleased for Corbyn the man. It is somewhat of a vindication of his way of doing things. Although Labour as a political entity can go to hell. Both theirs and the Tories' brand of neo-liberalism will decimate this country for the vast majority. The rich and the elite minority will always be spared the worst of it.

The Tories are kicking themselves for calling the election in the first place. It has backfired on them.

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9 minutes ago, Ranjeet01 said:

The Tories are kicking themselves for calling the election in the first place. It has backfired on them.

Definitely. It was a gamble that failed.

I'm hearing rumbles of selecting a new younger leader. If they're thinking of going for a Macron / Trudeau type elite puppet, Britain is done for. These Oxbridge and Eton cucks are the enemy, lol.

Edited by MisterrSingh

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20 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Definitely. It was a gamble that failed.

I'm hearing rumbles of selecting a new younger leader. If they're thinking of going for a Macron / Trudeau type elite puppet, Britain is done for. These Oxbridge and Eton cucks are the enemy, lol.

We've had that with Blair and Cameron. I am not sure that people will fall for that again.

The problem is that people prefer to have their PMs voted in via election rather than in some party leadership contest.

People don't feel that you have earnt it via party leadership. 

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12 minutes ago, Ranjeet01 said:

We've had that with Blair and Cameron. I am not sure that people will fall for that again.

You think too highly of the people, hehe.

But, yes, I think Britain is a lot more cynical now in that regard. The virtue-signalling liberal Marxists will be angling for a British Obama to highlight how incredibly tolerant and forward-looking they are, or even a female leader, whilst the Tories could go for another photogenic Cameron-type figure, or equally an older and wiser head. It depends what conclusions they draw from this election.

Edited by MisterrSingh

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3 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Coalition Government time.

A lot of youngsters voted for Corbyn enticed by the pledge to scrap tuition fees.

Ironic since it was a Labour government that introduced them in the first place.

I wonder if he was voted in whether he really would have followed through on that.

May will be a sitting duck PM. There is going to be no confidence in her. Every decision will be undermined. 

There are rumours that there is going to be an Autumn election and maybe another referendum.

 

everyone knows that Blair was a tory in a red tie , I mean the guy admitted to idolising Maggie T. May has given EU bureaucrats cause for elation because they know she has no backbone, does things in secret not telling her team , is easy to manipulate, has no capacity of thinking on her feet.  

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8 hours ago, jkvlondon said:

everyone knows that Blair was a tory in a red tie , I mean the guy admitted to idolising Maggie T. May has given EU bureaucrats cause for elation because they know she has no backbone, does things in secret not telling her team , is easy to manipulate, has no capacity of thinking on her feet.  

Juncker is very pleased.

But we realise that May is not a leader, she is a follower.

My own perception was that she was someone that more like a safe pair of hands (like an administrator ), granted that she did not do much in her 6 years as Home minister but I was wrong. 

She did not do any of the debates and seems quite uncomfortable in front of camera. She seems to be quite unhinged in some ways and cracks under pressure.

Compare her to Corbyn who seems to stand his ground, seems to be very comfortable in his own skin. And he also never shouts and does not seem to crack under pressure.

I am not a fan of either him or May but I have to begrudgingly have to give qudos to Corbyn.

But in the end of the day Labour still lost and we still have a Tory led government. 

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9 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

You think too highly of the people, hehe.

But, yes, I think Britain is a lot more cynical now in that regard. The virtue-signalling liberal Marxists will be angling for a British Obama to highlight how incredibly tolerant and forward-looking they are, or even a female leader, whilst the Tories could go for another photogenic Cameron-type figure, or equally an older and wiser head. It depends what conclusions they draw from this election.

People seem to like the fresh faced young energetic types.

Like I may have mentioned before elections are popularity contests and people vote on perception rather than mandates and policies.

If people vote on policies it would be something very simple or superficial like less taxes, less immigration, no tuition fees. They are more like bribes and incentives.

We vote these types in and at the end of the term they look all haggarded and worn out.

If you compare Obama from 2009 to 2017, he has considerably aged.

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10 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

You think too highly of the people, hehe.

But, yes, I think Britain is a lot more cynical now in that regard. The virtue-signalling liberal Marxists will be angling for a British Obama to highlight how incredibly tolerant and forward-looking they are, or even a female leader, whilst the Tories could go for another photogenic Cameron-type figure, or equally an older and wiser head. It depends what conclusions they draw from this election.

Another thought.

The Tories are going into coalition with the DUP. 

They are anti-gay marriage,  anti-abortion. 

The virtue-signalling liberal Marxists are going to love that.

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9 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

The virtue-signalling liberal Marxists are going to love that.

One of the first articles the Guardian rushed to print yesterday - when the deal between the DUP and Tories was made - was a scaremongering piece about the DUP being anti-Gay, anti-abortion, and anti whatever else these people consider to be important. It was as if some people in Britain were about to be rounded up and transported to the gulags for liquidation. 

Funnily enough, the likes of the Guardian have to tread very carefully around the issue of the traditionalism of the DUP,  because if they go too hard on the Tories' new allies, it would suggest almost a tacit support of the IRA and their policies. Although, with the likes of the Guardian's apologetics regarding Islamic terrorism, an inadvertent supportive stance for the IRA isn't too much of a stretch for them. But of course one important difference is the whiteness of the IRA, lol; white terrorist privilege, hehe. 

Edited by MisterrSingh

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2 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

One of the first articles the Guardian rushed to print yesterday when the deal between the DUP and Tories was finalised was a scaremongering piece about the DUP being anti-Gay, anti-abortion, and anti whatever else these people consider to be important. It was as if some people in Britain were about to be rounded up and transported to the gulags for liquidation. 

Funnily enough, the likes of the Guardian have to tread very carefully around the issue of the traditionalism of the DUP,  because if they go too hard on the Tories' new allies, it would suggest almost a tacit support of the IRA and their policies. Although, with the likes of the Guardian's apologetics regarding Islamic terrorism, an inadvertent supportive stance for the IRA isn't too much of a stretch for them. But of course one important difference is the whiteness of the IRA, lol; white terrorist privilege, hehe. 

What is very interesting I find is that the DUP have 10 seats in Northern Ireland. 

Their total amount of votes is several hundred thousand. Which is unbelievable considering they have won more seats with less votes than other parties.

For example UKIP won 4 million votes in 2015 (even more than SNP) but with no seats. 

I think coalition politics makes strange bedfellows.

But I think it could be a very dangerous thing.

Just suppose there is an Islamic based party ( similar to Respect Party) who had won certain seats in certain places like Luton, Bradford, East London and Birmingham where there are high proportion of muslims. In theory if there was a hung parliament where Labour had the largest share could join hands with these types.

You don't have to win many seats to make a difference. 

Just something to ponder. 

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