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How many wife's did our guru's really have?

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12 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

It's wrong to marry more than once unless they pass away or you have to divorce or something???

Is this a question or a statement?

12 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

As Guru Gobind singh Ji made it clear that his relationship with Mata Sahib Devan would be of a spiritual nature and not physical.

This is one of the few true statements you have made in your post. This is agreed by all Sikhs.

12 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

its because men and women are equal in sikhism, and it wouldn't be equal if a man had three wives or somthing!

And here we have the reason that Sikhs having grown up in the West question their Guru: feminism. As I mentioned above, feminism is basically in the air we breath, it's very difficult to think with a clear mind, and that's why Sikhs feel compelled to "Bowderlize" Guru's history so they can pretend before their feminist Western friends that the Guru's were basically Jeremy Corbyn except with a turban and longer beard.I fear that, if it were to be incontrovertibly demonstrated that Guru Sahib had more than one wife, these sorts of Sikhs would keep to feminism, but leave Sikhism, because their basic, underlying faith is feminism, which they have been taught since kindergarten and believe in unquestioningly.

 The fact is that Mata Jito Ji and Sundri ji have different genealogies, different birthplaces, and also different dates of demise, and landmarks commemorating their demise (in Anandpur and Delhi).

12 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

IF YOU HAVE DONE SEHAJ PATH ONCE IN YOUR LIFE YOU WOULD KNOW THIS TRUTH. and you would not ask or need any reference to support this truth. 

Well, brother, have you ever done Sehaj Path once in your life? Go ahead and mention where it says in Guru Granth Sahib ji not to have more than one wife.

13 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

at age 10, he married Mata Jito on 21 June 1677 at Basantgaṛh, 10 km north of Anandpur. Later another ceremony was performed on 4 April 1684 at Anandpur known as Muklawa. Mata Jito was later known as Mata Sundari as she was very beautiful and was named by the Guru's mother as sundari (beautiful). The couple had four sons: Jujhar Singh (b. 1691), Zorawar Singh (b. 1696), Fateh Singh (b. 1699) and Ajit Singh (b. 1687)

Mata Sundri ji and Mata Jeeto ji have different parents (and geneologies), different offspring, and different landmarks that commemorate their demises in totally different cities (Delhi vs. Anandpur Sahib).

13 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

At age 33 Guru Gobind Singh Ji received a marriage proposal Mata Sahib Kaur|Mata Sahib Devan

OK.

13 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

In 1699, the Guru asked her to put pataasas (puffed sugar) in the water for preparing Amrit when he founded the Khalsa Panth.

This is totally made up. Mata Sahib Kaur ji was not even married to Guru Gobind Singh ji in 1699 (or, as you put it "not-married"). Mata Sahib Kaur ji wed Guru Gobind SIngh ji in Samvat 1757. The Khanda Amrit ceremony occured in Samvat 1756.

13 hours ago, Guest Amar Singh said:

From ignorance of Punjabi culture and the Amrit ceremony, some writers mistook these three names of the women in the life of Guru Gobind Singh as the names of his three wives. 

You know, it would be appreciated if you put quotations in blockquotes, and specified the name of the writer. This is not your writing, you copy-pasted it from elsewhere. As I mentioned above, this is from a book of questions and answers for children by Dr. Gurbakhsh Singh of Washington, DC. Some of the book is OK, but here he has taken to making stuff up out of whole cloth.

I wonder which writers does he think were ignorant of Punjabi culture? Kavi Santokh Singh ji?? Does he think that he's the first writer, someplace in the late 20th century, to become knowledgeable about Punjabi culture and the Amrit ceremony, and all Sikh writers previous to him had no knowledge of Punjabi culture? Boggles the mind.

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Guest Don't judge

Nothing wrong with 8 wives for the Guru Sahibaan

I'm sure if Guru Nanak had received the rishtey they too would have had 8 wives

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It's not proven whether or not the sixth Patshahi had 8 wives.  This claim originated in Gurbilas Patshahi Chevin, so it's very contestable. 

As for Dasmesh Pita Ji, there were clear reasons as to why he had three.

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Guest Proof 8 wives

Sant Ji, Giani Gurbachan Singh Bhindranwale, Sant Baba Harnam Singh Bhindranwale and Damdami Taksal all say Guru Sahib had 8 wives so that proves it

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11 hours ago, Guest Proof 8 wives said:

Sant Ji, Giani Gurbachan Singh Bhindranwale, Sant Baba Harnam Singh Bhindranwale and Damdami Taksal all say Guru Sahib had 8 wives so that proves it

Yeah, I and many other people, don't believe in your Sants or what they say, for that matter. 

Taksalis probably believe in it. But I don't, because I'm not Taksali (I chose the ID name purely because it rythmes). 

Edited by akaltaksal
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1 hour ago, akaltaksal said:

Yeah, I and many other people, don't believe in your Sants or what they say, for that matter. 

Taksalis probably believe in it. But I don't, because I'm not Taksali (I chose the ID name purely because it rythmes). 

Please don't use the name of Taksal if you're against it. If you're not a Taksali, or Taksal-follower, then you should change your username. Using this name is simply false advertising, or a fraud. It would be like using a name @akjforever, but being an opponent of AKJ, or @nihungsing1984 and being against the Nihangs.

Just click on your username in the upper right corner, click Settings, then Display Name. There are rhyming dictionaries available to find rhyming words to help you find your next user name.

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17 hours ago, akaltaksal said:

It's not proven whether or not the sixth Patshahi had 8 wives.  This claim originated in Gurbilas Patshahi Chevin, so it's very contestable. 

Gurbilas Patshahi 6 simply does not state that Sixth Guru had 8 wives. If you say it does, post the pertinent lines from Gurbilas. They don't exist.

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2 minutes ago, BhForce said:

Gurbilas Patshahi 6 simply does not state that Sixth Guru had 8 wives. If you say it does, post the pertinent lines from Gurbilas. They don't exist.

I will shortly.

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23 hours ago, Guest Don't judge said:

Nothing wrong with 8 wives for the Guru Sahibaan

I'm sure if Guru Nanak had received the rishtey they too would have had 8 wives

Why did you name yourself "Guest Don't judge" ??!

By doing so, you are implying that Sikhs should not "judge" their Guru for having multiple wives.

You do know that the way people use that word in English is for bad stuff, e.g., some dude is a player, somebody condemns him, and a 3rd person says "Don't judge, we're all tempted to sin".

 Now, why would you imply Sikhs should not "judge" Guru Sahib, unless you're also implying Guru ji committed some kind of sin?

I.e., your self-chosen username totally undermined the point you made in your post.

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50 minutes ago, BhForce said:

Please don't use the name of Taksal if you're against it. If you're not a Taksali, or Taksal-follower, then you should change your username. Using this name is simply false advertising, or a fraud. It would be like using a name @akjforever, but being an opponent of AKJ, or @nihungsing1984 and being against the Nihangs.

Just click on your username in the upper right corner, click Settings, then Display Name. There are rhyming dictionaries available to find rhyming words to help you find your next user name.

The word 'Taksal' isn't copyrighted. It's just a word. I'd acknowledge your point if I had used 'DamDami Taksal', But I didn't. I simply just used two rythming Panjabi words. Hun Panjabi boli de aam mamooli shabada outhe vi rakhva haq maronge?

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Also, I didn't state anywhere that I was against your sants or sanstha. If you equate disagreement, disassociation or lack of reverance with opposition, Then there's something fundamentally wrong with that type of reasoning. 

Edited by akaltaksal

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Just now, akaltaksal said:

The word 'Taksal' isn't copyrighted. It's just a word. I'd acknowledge your point if I had used 'DamDami Taksal', But I didn't. I simply just used two rythming Panjabi words. Hun Panjabi boli de aam mamooli shabada outhe vi rakhva haq maronge?

taksal means mint ...yourname  literally is nonsense who can stamp copies of Akal out ?

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1 minute ago, jkvlondon said:

taksal means mint ...yourname  literally is nonsense who can stamp copies of Akal out ?

Uhhmmmm... It's just a name ??? 

It can also mean 'Akal's Mint'. 

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