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dallysingh101    1,582

This was really interesting. I didn't know Osama was considered a positive icon in places with historically bad relationships with America:

 

 

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MisterrSingh    2,802
Quote

I didn't know Osama was considered a positive icon in places with historically bad relationships with America:

Yes, he was considered by some as, how we'd commonly perceive, a sant-type figure. They called him Sheikh, which is a prefix used for a religious scholar on occasions. The old, "One man's terrorist, another man's freedom fighter" maxim dependent on which side you happen to be.

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dallysingh101    1,582
1 hour ago, MisterrSingh said:

Yes, he was considered by some as, how we'd commonly perceive, a sant-type figure. They called him Sheikh, which is a prefix used for a religious scholar on occasions. The old, "One man's terrorist, another man's freedom fighter" maxim dependent on which side you happen to be.

How Osama is perceived in certain nonmuslim countries like Cuba was an eye opener for me. 

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MisterrSingh    2,802
1 hour ago, dallysingh101 said:

How Osama is perceived in certain nonmuslim countries like Cuba was an eye opener for me. 

My eyes were opened to these type of hypocrisies when they refer to Sant Jarnail Singh as a terrorist. The word loses all meaning. I'm not saying Osama was a Sant Jarnail Singh type figure, but it's a label that's a quick and convenient way of writing off a man in this day and age. I mean, look how Nelson Mandela went from being widely known as a militant / terrorist to an almost Dalai Lama-esque figure of peace for Westerners. They'd make a donkey their father if circumstances were convenient. Who knows how many men they've mislabelled throughout recent history?

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kalyugi    23

I have been called osama too. I hate this phucker so much , because of his appearance all sikhs are in deep sht.

these terrorists sullay have ruined it for us sikhs. the irony is we have such a bad history with mughals and jihadis type.

but america and people are too dumb to know a difference between sikh and a muslim.

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Jacfsing2    1,845
9 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

My eyes were opened to these type of hypocrisies when they refer to Sant Jarnail Singh as a terrorist. The word loses all meaning. I'm not saying Osama was a Sant Jarnail Singh type figure, but it's a label that's a quick and convenient way of writing off a man in this day and age. I mean, look how Nelson Mandela went from being widely known as a militant / terrorist to an almost Dalai Lama-esque figure of peace for Westerners. They'd make a donkey their father if circumstances were convenient. Who knows how many men they've mislabelled throughout recent history?

Who calls Sant Jarnail Singh Bhinderwale that, (I'm not mentioning it because "Sant Ka Nindak", and we know what will follow), is not someone we should view as role models. Bhagat Singh and Udham Singh were considered high-class criminals for their freedom movements. Also there isn't really much you could to a Mahapurukh who fights for righteousness and some thug who wears a turban because he thinks it's cool, (Osama), the fact is one didn't kill any innocent people and the other one did kill innocent people. Even Muslims don't like him almost universally; while the other is at least sadly controversial among our people, (to assume every Sikh likes him is also stupidity).

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