Jump to content

Recommended Posts

pavitarsin    3
1 hour ago, Kira said:

The illustrations are just beautiful 

Aren't those?

These just captivated me, somehow i felt attracted to them i saw them the first time, i had just seen the cover of the book & a few pages inside and he was quite a salesman for I'd never felt so religious or spiritual but through some of his stuff, i just wanted to take it, grab it, steal it, the way he "weaved" stories around simple objects, it's quite amazing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pavitarsin    3
1 minute ago, pavitarsin said:

Aren't those?

These just captivated me, somehow i felt attracted to them i saw them the first time, i had just seen the cover of the book & a few pages inside and he was quite a salesman for I'd never felt so religious or spiritual but through some of his stuff, i just wanted to take it, grab it, steal it, the way he "weaved" stories around simple objects, it's quite amazing

Maybe I'll make a new thread about this topic,

Something that attracts us, relating to our culture or something else that just makes the hair on your arms stand up, when you just hear some sikh historical Story, it happened with me quite a few times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Jacfsing2   
Guest Jacfsing2
11 hours ago, pavitarsin said:

Yeah, i know what you're saying, & quite frankly I'm only interested in these books, granths, written material, the other things without any proof has to be 99% fake, cause when i met him he refused to show me gurujis personal belongings that I'm sure of that he's auctioning that stuff somewhere in europe, he has auctioned before & he will again, these scriptures would've been lost again in some collector's possession, hopefully I'll be able to get some more written material from him.

I don't these are Guru Sahib's Gutkas but I would still get it for a simple reason: it's still historical since it shows Larivaar and the fact that during Ranjit Singh's time Sikhi was at all time low for these Devta pictures. If you go before or after the Sikh Empire you wouldn't find these Gutkas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Topics

  • Posts

    • http://www.sikhmatrimonials.com/Sikhnet/discussion.nsf/ca32680024ff68b487256a08007e86d8/950014563418440f87256fc00033d318!OpenDocument
      During my visits to the Harimandir Sahib in late 1990s when I was studying at Guru Nanak Dev University in Amritsar, I often came across a very familiar scene – Inside the sanctum sanctorum, sitting opposite to the ‘kirtaniyes’, a man in his 30s, in a sense of extreme gush, mesmerized and actuated by the euphoria of the keertan, physically detached from the World around him, his eyes closed with tears flowing down his cheeks and drenching his black flowing beard.

      Something conspicuously different from what others were doing- hurling their way towards the sanctum sanctorum, making their own space to bow down and offer their respects, very cautious of the positioning of the cameras, telecasting live images around the world. 

      Wow! I used to say every time I saw him. I thought, this is what one needs in order to attain a humane connection with that place and the environment. But I also realized that this was something inveterate, which would only come with time, filled with love for the Guru and Gurbani…

      hau reh na ska bin dekhe preetma mai neer vahe vahe chale jeeo. 
      I cannot survive without seeing my Beloved. My eyes are welling up with tears. 
      (M4; Pg 94; SGGS)

      But I was also a bit puzzled. Why this melancholy? It is said, ‘’how but through a broken heart can Lord enter’’. Was it the environment, the shabad or something else? It was all-in-one I guess. Sitting with crossed legs, closed eyes, listening to the ‘dhur ki baani’ written by our Gurus – this reaction is inevitable if we really concentrate on the shabad, its meaning and environment.

      Also, is melancholy a reflection of the Sikhs’ perception of ‘man neevan’ which they utter daily in their prayer, ‘man neevan; mat uchee’? (humble mind and exalted wisdom). It’s such a unique combination of the ‘man’ (mind) being humble but at the same time the spirits being high.     
    • You're not alone in wondering why people do this. As far as my observations, people who name thier daughters maya don't have a clue what maya is or the concept of maya. These people tend to be Sikh in name only. They do it purely to be modern while keeping an 'indian flavour' to thier childs name.
    • Guest Kaur 2
      VJKK VJKF This question has been eating at me for quite a long time now. I thought that maya what something that distracts us from Vaheguru so why do people call their daughters maya? Do you think it comes from Bollywood? Just a thought. VJKK VJKF  
    • Waheguru ji ka khalsa Waheguru ji ki fateh !! Sangat Ji, Just came across this interesting read while downloading Kirtan from Sikhnet. Thought i should share.. https://www.sikhnet.com/news/why-do-sikhs-celebrate-bandi-chhor-divas-so-much Source: http://americanbornconfusedsikh.blogspot.ca/2017/10/why-do-sikhs-celebrate-bandi-chor-divas.html   P.S  - I do not affiliate or follow 3HO or any related sikh organisations   Waheguru ji ka khalsa Waheguru ji ki fateh !!      
    • Guest Kaur 2
      VJKK VJKF Guru Gobind Singh Ji maharaj says in Sri Dasam Granth Sahib: Look though these images and you will get your answer.
×