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THE POWER OF ARDAAS : ATEE SUNDAR KATHA

 

 

 

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Having Wahiguru as a friend.

 

When you call upon Him through bhakti

He walks beside you as a Sajjan to comfort you

walks above you to watch over you

walks behind you as a Rakhanhaar  to keep you safe

and

with His Jot walks before you

to show you the way

towards your True Home

Sach Khand

 

Sat Sree Akal.

 

 

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There is a time when a Sikh reaches a point of recognizing Naam around him.  This point teaches many lessons.  We with the will of the Guru can see the Naam in plants, animals, trees, dirt and rocks.  The Gurus given eyes provide us the ability to see how a tree can illuminate Gurus knowledge.  

However we fail to see the Gurus knowledge spoken by those who don't fit a image of a person who should be speaking of the Guru.  For example a person who drinks and can even be a person who gets drunk most Fridays. But one day she or he speaks something she learned from Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji.  Many of us will discount what she says because of her look and/or because of her drinking alcohol.  However there is Naam coming from that girls voice.  The message is Gurmat even though the person delivering it is filled with mistakes.  This has nothing to do with letting manmat people speak from the Gurus stage.  This has everything to do with being in society on a daily basis.  A person beginning to learn Sikhi won't be able to recognize what is Gurmat (Naam) from the persons speech.  So in no way is this post for them and will only cause you to drift away from the Guru.  This is for a select few stuck in the black and white of recognizing Naam.  Gurbani says Naam is everywhere.....recognize it and you will be uplifted from misery.  Recognizing this Naam in the speech of a manmat comes from devoting yourself to the Guru.  In return Guru Sahib softens the heart to see the Naam.  The Gurus compassion shows the way.  Many Sikhs today enforce the rule of make an honest living as the highest and most important way to Vaheguru.  Then they place doing charity work and last if time permits doing simran of Vaheguru.  Let me provide you with an example I learned from society emitting Naam.  A dog makes an honest living by going out and collecting food for itself and its young.  If another animal attacks the pack of dogs the dogs collectively do seva by protecting the weak.  The dog makes an honest living and does seva.  According to some Sikhs these two are the most important.  Then why hasn't the dog achieved mukti???? The dog can't achieve mukhti because it can't do simran of Vaheguru.  Simran is the most important.  Look at a tree.  Standing to provide shade to the animals and people.  It makes a honest living and shares in the wealth by letting other animals eat its roots as food and lets surrounding trees use its strong roots for their nourishment needs by joining together. Again the tree does not attain mukhti.  Why not????? Naam is all around us.  We need to develop the Gurus eyes and ears to learn from the Gurus. :) 

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4 minutes ago, Akalifauj said:

There is a time when a Sikh reaches a point of recognizing Naam around him.  This point teaches many lessons.  We with the will of the Guru can see the Naam in plants, animals, trees, dirt and rocks.  The Gurus given eyes provide us the ability to see how a tree can illuminate Gurus knowledge.  

However we fail to see the Gurus knowledge spoken by those who don't fit a image of a person who should be speaking of the Guru.  For example a person who drinks and can even be a person who gets drunk most Fridays. But one day she or he speaks something she learned from Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji.  Many of us will discount what she says because of her look and/or because of her drinking alcohol.  However there is Naam coming from that girls voice.  The message is Gurmat even though the person delivering it is filled with mistakes.  This has nothing to do with letting manmat people speak from the Gurus stage.  This has everything to do with being in society on a daily basis.  A person beginning to learn Sikhi won't be able to recognize what is Gurmat (Naam) from the persons speech.  So in no way is this post for them and will only cause you to drift away from the Guru.  This is for a select few stuck in the black and white of recognizing Naam.  Gurbani says Naam is everywhere.....recognize it and you will be uplifted from misery.  Recognizing this Naam in the speech of a manmat comes from devoting yourself to the Guru.  In return Guru Sahib softens the heart to see the Naam.  The Gurus compassion shows the way.  Many Sikhs today enforce the rule of make an honest living as the highest and most important way to Vaheguru.  Then they place doing charity work and last if time permits doing simran of Vaheguru.  Let me provide you with an example I learned from society emitting Naam.  A dog makes an honest living by going out and collecting food for itself and its young.  If another animal attacks the pack of dogs the dogs collectively do seva by protecting the weak.  The dog makes an honest living and does seva.  According to some Sikhs these two are the most important.  Then why hasn't the dog achieved mukti???? The dog can't achieve mukhti because it can't do simran of Vaheguru.  Simran is the most important.  Look at a tree.  Standing to provide shade to the animals and people.  It makes a honest living and shares in the wealth by letting other animals eat its roots as food and lets surrounding trees use its strong roots for their nourishment needs by joining together. Again the tree does not attain mukhti.  Why not????? Naam is all around us.  We need to develop the Gurus eyes and ears to learn from the Gurus. :) 

 

This is indeed a good post.  (y)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Akalifauj said:

There is a time when a Sikh reaches a point of recognizing Naam around him.  This point teaches many lessons.  We with the will of the Guru can see the Naam in plants, animals, trees, dirt and rocks.  The Gurus given eyes provide us the ability to see how a tree can illuminate Gurus knowledge.  

However we fail to see the Gurus knowledge spoken by those who don't fit a image of a person who should be speaking of the Guru.  For example a person who drinks and can even be a person who gets drunk most Fridays. But one day she or he speaks something she learned from Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji.  Many of us will discount what she says because of her look and/or because of her drinking alcohol.  However there is Naam coming from that girls voice.  The message is Gurmat even though the person delivering it is filled with mistakes.  This has nothing to do with letting manmat people speak from the Gurus stage.  This has everything to do with being in society on a daily basis.  A person beginning to learn Sikhi won't be able to recognize what is Gurmat (Naam) from the persons speech.  So in no way is this post for them and will only cause you to drift away from the Guru.  This is for a select few stuck in the black and white of recognizing Naam.  Gurbani says Naam is everywhere.....recognize it and you will be uplifted from misery.  Recognizing this Naam in the speech of a manmat comes from devoting yourself to the Guru.  In return Guru Sahib softens the heart to see the Naam.  The Gurus compassion shows the way.  Many Sikhs today enforce the rule of make an honest living as the highest and most important way to Vaheguru.  Then they place doing charity work and last if time permits doing simran of Vaheguru.  Let me provide you with an example I learned from society emitting Naam.  A dog makes an honest living by going out and collecting food for itself and its young.  If another animal attacks the pack of dogs the dogs collectively do seva by protecting the weak.  The dog makes an honest living and does seva.  According to some Sikhs these two are the most important.  Then why hasn't the dog achieved mukti???? The dog can't achieve mukhti because it can't do simran of Vaheguru.  Simran is the most important.  Look at a tree.  Standing to provide shade to the animals and people.  It makes a honest living and shares in the wealth by letting other animals eat its roots as food and lets surrounding trees use its strong roots for their nourishment needs by joining together. Again the tree does not attain mukhti.  Why not????? Naam is all around us.  We need to develop the Gurus eyes and ears to learn from the Gurus. :) 

Very nice post. 

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Lord, make me an instrument of your peace... (a humble prayer)

 

Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
Where there is injury, pardon;
Where there is doubt, faith;
Where there is despair, hope;
Where there is darkness, light;
Where there is sadness, joy;

O Lord, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
To be understood as to understand;
To be loved as to love.

For it is in giving that we receive;
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
And it is in dying(bhakti kills ego) that we are born to eternal life(mukti).

 

Sat Sree Akal.

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ENLIGHTENMENT

 

"Enlightenment or true spiritual growth, can be achieved only through persistent exercise of real love.”

 

*And the persistent excercise of real love, is the only one we offer to our beloved Wahiguru Akal Purukh, through Bhakti.

There are many types of love in different relationships, but He being the embodiment of supreme Truth, is the only One Being(Ik Oankar), worthy of all our unconditional love, and more, and more, and more love, without reservations.

Sat Sree Akal.

Edited by harsharan000
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                                            TRUE UNIVERSAL SIKHYAA

ਧੁਰਿ ਕਰਮੁ ਜਿਨਾ ਕਉ ਤੁਧੁ ਪਾਇਆ ਤਾ ਤਿਨੀ ਖਸਮੁ ਧਿਆਇਆ ॥

Dhhur Karam Jinaa Ko Thudhh Paaeiaa Thaa Thinee Khasam Dhhiaaeiaa ||

Only on those, whose karma You have pre-ordained from the very beginning, O Lord, they meditate on You.

Raag Aasaa , Dhan Dhan  Dhan Satguru Guru Nanak Dev  Maharaj

 

Edited by harsharan000
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Q: Who is God? What does God look like?

A: Guru Granth Sahib Ji describes and praises Him in the following shabads :

"God is One. He is the Supreme Truth. He the Creator, is without fear and without hate. He is immortal. He is neither born and nor does He die. By Guru's grace shall He be met. Chant And Meditate on His Name. In the beginning, He was the Truth. Throughout the ages, He has been the Truth. He is the Truth now and He shall be the Truth forever"

The most important aspect is to understand that, there is one endless God.

He is indescribable, inestimable, indubitable, infallible, intangible, imperishable, immutable, immortal, immaculate, immanent, unconquerable, unique, formless, fearless, deathless, timeless, ageless, compassionate, omnipresent and creator of all.

"There is only the One Supreme Lord; there is no other at all.

Spirit, soul and body, all belong to Him; whatever pleases His Will, comes to pass"

God loves everyone.

This in sikhee is a unique universal Truth, unlike other religions, where their gods, godesses love their followers or devotees, but in Sikhee, Guru Jee tells us that He loves, even those who may belong to other religions, or even furthermore, do not believe in Him at all, yet He loves all jeeva atmas/souls, for all His particles, of His Akhoot Jot.

Sikhs believe there is no one superior to God. Furthermore, Sikhs believe that God created all beings, animals, birds, creatures, including humans. When the first great Guru Nanak Dev Maharaj, the founder of Sikh faith, gave this definition to the people who believed differently in God, they were surprised and they asked him, who told you this and how did God come in existence?

The great Guru explained that God Himself gave him this information. God has always been present.

The concept of time is very worldly. There is no time, beginning or end when it comes to God.

This is very hard to understand for us humans because we are used to the concept of begin and end with time.

People further asked Guru Nanak Dev Ji about what does God look like?

The great Guru preached that God is formless. God is beyond gender and shape. "He has no form, no shape, no color; God is beyond these three qualities. One understands Him, O Nanak, with whom God is pleased".

God has no body, He is the greatest Spirit of all, and as seen above our soul is a part of Him.

The main difference between Sikhism and some of the world’s other religions is that there are people who worship Jesus and believe Jesus is God, some people worship Buddha and believe Buddha is God.

The Sikh Gurus themselves said, that they are not to be worshipped.

They expressed very clearly not to worship anyone except God.  Dasvee Patshahee Guru Gobind Singh Maharaj, even put it in harsh words and said, “Those who call me God will fall into the pit of hell.

Consider me as a humble servant of God and have no doubt about it.

” He wanted to be very clear that He is not God and should not be worshipped. One should only worship the One Almighty Lord.

While avtars of gods come and add multiplicity/variety/diversity, to the already agyanta spread by Maya, Guru Sahiban being His manifestation, out of utmost humility, say that, they are just His servants.

WAHEGURU.

Sat Sree Akal.

 

Edited by harsharan000
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SEWA

 

SEWA, from Sanskrit root sev (to serve, wait or attend upon, honour, or worship), is usually translated as `service` or `serving` which commonly relates to work paid for, but does not convey the sense in which the term is used in the Sikh tradition. The word seva has, in fact, had two distinct connotations ; one, it means to serve, to attend to, to render obedience to ; and the second, to worship, to adore, to reverence, to pay homage to. Traditionally in the Indian ( Hindu) society, seva in the sense of worship (of gods) has been the preserve of the high caste Brahmans, while that in the sense of service (to man) relegated to the lowest of the castes. In the Sikh sense, the two connotations seem to have merged together for the reasons : first, because of its egalitarian meaning.

Sikhism does not recognize caste distinctions, and hence no distinctive caste roles in it; and second. God in Sikhism is not apart from His creatures. He pervades His Creation (GG, 1350). Therefore service rendered to humanity (i.e. God in man) is indeed considered a form of worship. In fact, in Sikhism, no worship is conceivable without seva (GG, 1013).

The Sikh is forbidden from serving anyone apart from God (`Serve you the Lord alone : none else must you serve` (GG, 490). However, this also means that whomsoever we serve, we really serve our Lord through him. Therefore it becomes incumbent upon the Sikh to render seva with the highest sense of duty since thereby he or she is worshipping the Lord.Seva in Sikhism is imperative for spiritual life.

It is the highest penance (GG,423). It is a means to acquiring the highest merit. The Sikh often prays to God for a chance to render seva, Says Guru Arjan, NanakV, "I beg to serve those who serve you (GG, 43)" and "I, your servant, beg for seva of your people, which is available through good fortune alone (GG, 802)." According to Guru Amar Das, "He who is turned towards the Guru finds repose and joy in seva" (GG, 125).

Three varieties of seva are sanctioned in the Sikh lore : that rendered through the corporal instrument (tan), that through the mental apparatus (man) and that through the material wherewithal (dhan).The first of them is considered to be the highest of all and is imperatively prescribed for every Sikh. "Cursed are the hands and feet that engage not in seva" (Bhai Gurdas, Varan, 27.1). In traditional Indian society work involving corporal labour was considered low and relegated to the humblest castes.

By sanctifying it as an honourable religious practice, the Sikh Gurus established the dignity of labour, a concept then almost unknown to the Indian society. Not only did the Gurus sanctify it ; they also institutionalized it, e.g. service in Guru ka Langar ( the Guru`s community kitchen) and serving the sangat (holy assembly) in other ways such as by grinding corn for it, fanning it to soften the rigour of a hot day and drawing water for it." I beg of you, 0, Merciful One, make me the slave of your Slaves... Let me have the pleasure of fanning them, drawing water for them, grinding corn for them and of washing their feet," prays Guru Arjan (GG, 51H). Seva through the mental apparatus (man) lies in contributing ones talents creative, communicative, managerial, etc. to the corporate welfare of the community and mankind in general.

It also lies in sharing the pain of others. Response to the pain of others is a sine qua non of the membership of the brotherhood of man. That is why the Sikh prayer said in unison ends with a supplication for the welfare of all.Seva of this kind is motivated not by the attitude of compassion alone, but primarily to discover practical avenues for serving God through man.

Seva through material means (dhan) or philanthropy (dan) was particularly sought to be made non personal. The offerings (kar bheta) made to the Gurus and the dasvandh (tithe) contributed by the Sikhs went straight into the common coffers of the community. Personal philanthropy can be debasing for the receiver and ego entrenching for the giver, but self effacing community service is ennobling. Seva must be so carried out as to dissolve the ego and lead to self transcendence, which is the ability to acknowledge and respond to that which is other than oneself.

Seva must serve to indicate the way in which such transcendence manifests in one`s responsiveness to the needs of others in an impersonal way. The Sikh is particularly enjoined upon to render seva to the poor. ^The poor man`s mouth is the depository of the Guru", says the Rahitnama of Chaupa Singh. The poor and the needy are, thus, treated as legitimate recipients of dan (charity) and not the Brahman who had traditionally reserved for himself this privilege.

Even in serving the poor, one serves not the individual concerned, but God Himself through him. Even as one feeds the hungry, it has been the customary Sikh practice to pray : "The grain, 0 God, is your own gift.Only the seva is mine which please be gracious enough to accept." In the Sikh way of life, seva is considered the prime duty of the householder (grihasthJ).

"That home in which holymen are not served, God is served not. Such mansions must be likened to graveyards where ghosts alone abide", says Kabir (GG.1374). The Sikhs are all ordained to be householders, and seva their duty. In Sikh thought, the polarity of renunciation is not with attachment, but with seva.

True seva according to Sikh scriptures must l)e without desire (nishkam), guileless (nishkapat), in humility (nimarta), with purity of intention (hirdasuddh), with. sincerity (chit Jae) and in utter selflessness (vichori apga ae).Such seva for the Sikh is the doorway to dignity as well as to mukti (liberation). "If one earns merit here through seva , one will get a seat of honour in His Court hereafter" (GG, 26).

According to Sikh tenets/You become like the one you serve" (GG, 549). Therefore, for those who desire oneness with God, serving God and God alone is the prime way.

God in Sikhism is transcendent  which can only be conceived through contemplation.

Service of God, is therefore realized by givinig oneself totally to Him, and one gives totally of oneself, when forgets one´s ego, one´s limited individual consciousness, in the time being when one is engaged in His Simran.

Thus the Bani says: Prabh Ka Simran sabh tay oochaaa.

This is the highest devotion or sewa, which can perfom, because it is not for the perishable mayavee koor, but for the love and desire to become one with Him, through His kirpa.

Sat Sree Akal.

 

 

only relates to the immanent aspect of God and comprises service of His creatures. Humanitarian service is thus the Sikh ideal of seva.

 

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