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Tea  

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  1. 1. How do u make your tea?

    • Desi style - water, Laung lechia, tea bags or leaves, saunf, milk, sugar all in one pathila (pan)
      20
    • Western style - tea bag (sugar) (milk) in mug with boiled kettle water
      3
    • Black tea without milk or sugar - western style
      1
    • Black tea with sugar - western style
      0
    • Any sort of herbal tea?
      5
    • Adrak (Ginger)
      5
    • No tea
      9
    • Alternatives or additional info. can be added by replying to the post.
      3


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apparently i heard drinking too much chai makes you dark !?!

never again drinking tea :nono: haha

you being wacist ? :ph34r: besides you get dark going out during the day not tea LOL

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you being wacist ? :ph34r: besides you get dark going out during the day not tea LOL

haha oh no no your confused that's for vampires, humans are okay to go out in the day :p

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haha oh no no your confused that's for vampires, humans are okay to go out in the day :p

try telling that to your average teenager :happy2:

Edited by jkvlondon
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Extracts from Wikipedia that should raise alarms (make up your own minds!):

Caffeine is a bitter, white crystalline xanthine alkaloid and a stimulant drug. Caffeine is found in varying quantities in the seeds, leaves, and fruit of some plants, where it acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plants, as well as enhancing the reward memory of pollinators.

In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. It is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug, but unlike many other psychoactive substances, it is legal and unregulated in nearly all parts of the world.

Caffeine overdose can result in a state of central nervous system over-stimulation called caffeine intoxication (DSM-IV 305.90).[44] This syndrome typically occurs only after ingestion of large amounts of caffeine, well over the amounts found in typical caffeinated beverages and caffeine tablets (e.g., more than 400–500 mg at a time). The symptoms of caffeine intoxication are comparable to the symptoms of overdoses of other stimulants: they may include restlessness, fidgeting, anxiety, excitement, insomnia, flushing of the face, increased urination, gastrointestinal disturbance, muscle twitching, a rambling flow of thought and speech, irritability, irregular or rapid heart beat, and psychomotor agitation.[56] In cases of much larger overdoses, mania, depression, lapses in judgment, disorientation, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, or psychosis may occur, and rhabdomyolysis (breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue) can be provoked.[57][58]

Extreme overdose can result in death.[59][60] The median lethal dose (LD50) given orally is 192 milligrams per kilogram in rats. The LD50 of caffeine in humans is dependent on individual sensitivity, but is estimated to be about 150 to 200 milligrams per kilogram of body mass or roughly 80 to 100 cups of coffee for an average adult.[61] Though achieving lethal dose of caffeine would be difficult with regular coffee, it is easier to reach high doses with caffeine pills, and the lethal dose can be lower in individuals whose ability to metabolize caffeine is impaired. Chronic liver disease is one factor that can slow the metabolism of caffeine.[62] There has been a reported death of a man who had liver cirrhosis overdosing on caffeinated mints.[63][64][65] Drugs such as fluvoxamine or levofloxacin can have a similar effect by blocking the liver enzyme responsible for the metabolism of caffeine, thus increasing the central effects and blood concentrations of caffeine five-fold.[58][59][60][66] The exact cause of death in such cases is uncertain, but may result from cardiac arrhythmia leading to cardiac arrest.

Treatment of severe caffeine intoxication is generally supportive, providing treatment of the immediate symptoms, but if the patient has very high serum levels of caffeine then peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or hemofiltration may be required.[56]

Addiction and tolerance
Main article: Caffeine addiction

With repetitive use, physical dependence or addiction may occur. Also, some effects of caffeine, particularly the autonomic effects, decrease over time, a phenomenon known as a tolerance. Tolerance develops quickly to some (but not all) effects of caffeine, especially among heavy coffee and energy drink consumers.[67] Some coffee drinkers develop tolerance to its sleep-disrupting effects, but others apparently do not.[31]

Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms – including headaches, irritability, inability to concentrate, drowsiness, insomnia, and pain in the stomach, upper body, and joints – may appear within 12 to 24 hours after discontinuation of caffeine intake, peak at roughly 48 hours, and usually last from 2 to 9 days.[68] Withdrawal headaches are experienced by 52% of people who stopped consuming caffeine for two days after an average of 235 mg caffeine per day prior to that.[69] In prolonged caffeine users, symptoms such as increased depression and anxiety, nausea, vomiting, physical pains and intense desire for caffeine are also reported. Peer knowledge, support and interaction may aid withdrawal.

Caffeine withdrawal is categorized as a mental disorder in the DSM-5 (the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association).[70] Previous versions of the manual included "caffeine intoxication" but not caffeine withdrawal.

Energy drinks such Redbull and the like which are high in caffeine and taurine can create respiratory system distress and when combined with alcohol as is popular amongst the pub crowd is a recipe for a heart attack or stroke so warn your nearest and dearest if they do the added step ... and those who don't as both things are pretty bad.

Thanks

ps. don't do what my chota khalsa veer did and drop the tea ....then start the coffee ... I had to smile at that one :happy2:

Edited by jkvlondon
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We in punjab have Khalsa Chah , prepared by some Singh Shopkeeper at Amritsar, same item is available y different ayurvedik pharmacies unde name desi chai, another good one I got from namdhari ppl the call it chahta, even my dad used to prepare it home by mxing some exotic herbs with saunf, dalchini , laung , mulethi etc. I also use green & white unprocessed tealeves which are very rich in anti oxidants and vwry nild in taste . For me coffee & black tea and normal cha are taboo

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We in punjab have Khalsa Chah , prepared by some Singh Shopkeeper at Amritsar, same item is available y different ayurvedik pharmacies unde name desi chai, another good one I got from namdhari ppl the call it chahta, even my dad used to prepare it home by mxing some exotic herbs with saunf, dalchini , laung , mulethi etc. I also use green & white unprocessed tealeves which are very rich in anti oxidants and vwry nild in taste . For me coffee & black tea and normal cha are taboo

Yes my family uses chahta & Khalsa Chah , it is very good herbal substitute for tea , Now another substitute in market is herbal concoction available in India under Brandname ORGANIC . It has many combos with Tulsi ( Indian holy Basil ) as main ingredient , with lemon , ginger , green tea , honey lemon etc . I find herbal spicers from Twinnings also very useful - specially CAMOMILLE which is quite soothing with calming effect on brain , specially to be had at the end of day , before bed

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Tea , though not defined as taboo item in any rehatnamah , I still feel is no no for us as all it has are rotten leaves of a plant ( many Sants who used to visit our house in my childhood used to say it has " Tambaku di putth" so my parents stopped taking it ) In winter i use many combos of desi chah ( chahta , saunfa , desi chah etc among many names i hear for these .

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when did drinking tea become bujjer kurehit?

The normal tea & tealeaves before appearing out kitchens goes through 3 processes - CTC ( Cutting Tanning & Curling processes) - I personally I feel if anyone witnesses the tanning process he will never take atleast black tea or the Indian chai . In the process the tealeaves cut inti small pieces ( like we cut cattle fodder ) and mixed with some chemicals and left in pits to rot ( oxidise ) so it gets the required colour , after a few days the wet leaves are roasted on s;low fire when it gets curled and takes for of grannules ( what we get in packs) & dust normally used in teabags . Like i have explained in another post here , my parents stopped having tea when one Mahapurush during his visit to our house explained it . Bujjer kurehats have been proscribed by our great 10 th Master , and during those days tea was not used in our motherland , it was introduced in India by Brits .

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Guest Jacfsing2

The normal tea & tealeaves before appearing out kitchens goes through 3 processes - CTC ( Cutting Tanning & Curling processes) - I personally I feel if anyone witnesses the tanning process he will never take atleast black tea or the Indian chai . In the process the tealeaves cut inti small pieces ( like we cut cattle fodder ) and mixed with some chemicals and left in pits to rot ( oxidise ) so it gets the required colour , after a few days the wet leaves are roasted on s;low fire when it gets curled and takes for of grannules ( what we get in packs) & dust normally used in teabags . Like i have explained in another post here , my parents stopped having tea when one Mahapurush during his visit to our house explained it . Bujjer kurehats have been proscribed by our great 10 th Master , and during those days tea was not used in our motherland , it was introduced in India by Brits .

Guru Sahib isn't just limited to India, plus he's Atarjami so he must know tea existed. There was a British doctor that helped Guru Sahib when he allowed himself to be stabbed, (because he controls all the events that happen to him).

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Guru Sahib isn't just limited to India, plus he's Atarjami so he must know tea existed. There was a British doctor that helped Guru Sahib when he allowed himself to be stabbed, (because he controls all the events that happen to him).

DO YOU SAY I AM INCORRECT HISTORICALLY ? OR THE FACTS PUT IN MY POST ARE INCORRECT?

Edited by JSINGHANANDPUR

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The normal tea & tealeaves before appearing out kitchens goes through 3 processes - CTC ( Cutting Tanning & Curling processes) - I personally I feel if anyone witnesses the tanning process he will never take atleast black tea or the Indian chai . In the process the tealeaves cut inti small pieces ( like we cut cattle fodder ) and mixed with some chemicals and left in pits to rot ( oxidise ) so it gets the required colour , after a few days the wet leaves are roasted on s;low fire when it gets curled and takes for of grannules ( what we get in packs) & dust normally used in teabags . Like i have explained in another post here , my parents stopped having tea when one Mahapurush during his visit to our house explained it . Bujjer kurehats have been proscribed by our great 10 th Master , and during those days tea was not used in our motherland , it was introduced in India by Brits .

The organic tea estate we went to as a family in darjeeling did not add anything to the leaves to oxidise and left leaves to naturally breakdown they stopped fermentation by steaming leaves at different stages so I cannot say if this was unique to them but that is my experience

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besides cha came from China the Portuguese brought it to Europe and then The Britsh brought it to India in a second wave to break Chinese monopoly of market.

It was originally used a medicinal drink not as the gorey drink it cup upon cup with sugar and milk

Edited by jkvlondon
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besides cha came from China the Portuguese brought it to Europe and then The Britsh brought it to India in a second wave to break Chinese monopoly of market.

It was originally used a medicinal drink not as the gorey drink it cup upon cup with sugar and milk

True. Cha was introduced to India by China, which leads me to something another fella said. He said:

apparently i heard drinking too much chai makes you...

Chai ????? :nono:

Have some Punjabi pride my friend. Cha was introduced to the whole sub-continent by the Chinese and guess what the Chinese word for tea is ?

Yes thats right, its Cha (tsa). Not 'chai'. It's Cha.

Just because them foreign people (Indians) that live in a foreign land to us (south of us in a place called Hindustan) and speak a foreign language (Hindi) have corrupted the correct word, i.e are too stupid to know the proper word, it does not mean we should join them.

Every time I hear Punjabis saying the word 'chai' I feel like punching them for their stupidity.

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  • Topics

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    • As per usual,  our openness and tolerance is seen as weakness for others, and they take full advantage. 
    • This is nothing new. I tried setting up an initiative to defeat this trend; happened a good few years back on this forum, but some of us decided to establish a body of sorts which would publish and distribute literature regarding the falsity spread by other faiths vis-a-vis Sikhi. Because we were based in different countries we used to stay in contact via email to exchange ideas and finalize publications in our own respective countries. I wrote and dispatched a particular article on the falsity that Bhagat Fareed was a hardcore Muslim and by incorporating his Bani into the Adi Guru Granth Sahib Ji, the Sikh Gurus proved their respect for Islam and hence all Sikhs should become Muslims. Here are some examples of what I wrote: "For Bhagat Farid, and Sufis in general, life is but nihilistic. Such a perception, logically, leads to renunciation and asceticism. Farid asserts:

      'Farid, had my throat been slit on the same day as my umbilical cord, I would not have been prey to trouble nor weathered such hardship. Farid, I alone thought I was in pain, but the whole world is in pain. I ascended my roof and witnessed each and every house in flame.' 
      -Saloks 76 and 81, ASGGS, Ang. 1381-82.

      When Guru Nanak Dev Ji had entered Multan, the local Sufis had tried to eject him on the pretext of his criticism of the Sufi order. The Guru had rejected their renunciation and described their acts of obeisance as charades. With this particular incident in mind, Guru Arjan Dev Ji elected to reply to Farid with the following:

      'The world is akin to a garden, Farid, in which poisonous plants take root. They for whom the Master cares suffer not at all.' 

      And:

      'How sweet be this life oh Farid! With health the body blooms, but they who love their dear beloved Lord are rarely found.' 
      -Mohalla 5, Saloks 82-83, ASGGS, Ang. 1382.

      The writings of Farid were incorporated into the Sikh canon to refute the notion that life, in general, is painful. For the Gurus life is what one makes out of it. Ignorance, naturally, leads to pain whilst knowledge leads to joy. By positing their views below Farids', the Sikh Gurus refuted the Sufi notion of life being suffering in toto.'   "The Sufi path of asceticism is best summed up in the following conversation between Sayid Muhammad Gesu Daraz and a suppliant. Daraz was the acolyte of Shaikh Farid Nasir-u'd-Din-Chiarg-i-Delhi, the disciple of Nizam-u'd-din Auliya who was the successor to Baba Farid. This conversation is recorded in the 'Jawama-u'l-Kilam' and focuses on the physical suffering weathered by Baba Farid in his search for the Divine. Pledging his mind to the Lord's path, the latter Farid hung upside down in a well for forty days and nights. 

      'Then one day when Sayid Muhammad Gesu Daraz was recounting the pledge of (Baba Farid), a man queried: "how is it that blood does not run out of the eyes and mouth of the person who undertakes it and how is it that foodstuff and other bodily elements do not come out of him?" The Saint explained that in a body as emaciated as that of Farid, the question of food and blood no longer lingers as austerities have reduced such a body to mere skeleton.' 

      Bhagat Farid writes:

      'Farid, if one were to hack my body, not a drop of blood would ooze from it. Those who are imbued with the Lord's love have no blood left in their beings.' 
      -Salok 51, ASGGS, Ang. 1380.

      Guru Amardass Ji comments on this Shabad in the following way:

      'The body is all blood, without blood it cannot exist. Those who are imbued with the Lord's love have not a single drop of selfish blood in their bodies. When the fear of Divine enters one's being, it becomes emaciated, and the blood of greed departs. As flames purify metal, so too does the fear of the Divine cast out impure inclinations. They alone are beautiful, Nanak, who are dyed with the love of the Lord.'
      -Mohalla 3, ASGGS, Salok 52, Ang. 1380. 

      Farid's ascetic undertones are sidelined, by the Guru, to provide a more rational interpretation of his words. Farid's "blood" becomes "selfish blood" and the external is transformed into the internal. It is not the physical frame which matters but the internal, the spiritual. Only through spiritual austerities can inimical inclinations depart; physical austerities only invite weakness and prolonged suffering."   "Now, we will look at the Bani of Bhagat Farid along with the relevant commentary by the Sikh Gurus. 

      'Farid, she who did not enjoy her spouse when black-haired, will she enjoy him when grey-haired? Love the Lord with such love that your hair's color will never change!'
      -Salok 12, ASGGS, Ang. 1378.

      Bhagat Farid holds that youth is conducive to following the spiritual path, in old age it is a lost cause. Guru Amardass Ji, who became the third Nanak at the age of 72, provides a commentary on this shabad:

      'Farid, whether one's hair be black or grey, the Lord is ever present if one remembers him. True love does not come from one's own desire, that cup of the Master's love he himself gives to whomever he desires.'
      -Mohalla 3, Salok 13, ASGGS, Ang. 1378.

      Bhagat Farid believes effort to be necessary vis-a-vis the spiritual path; the Sikh Gurus concur but to an extent. All transpires due to the Divine Will and man's efforts have a limit. Divine Will is more pontificate than man's efforts; man should elect to reside in this will and recognize where effort ends. From a Nanakian perspective effort is necessary in the temporal paradigm, but in the spiritual paradigm success depends on the Divine initiative. Guru Nanak Dev Ji states:

      'Does it matter if one is a swan or heron on whom the Lord casts his glance? Sayeth Nanak that if he so desires, crowns turn into swans.'
      -Mohalla 1, Salok 124, ASGGS, Ang. 1384. 

      The Lord is supreme in all that he does.

      Bhagat Farid then utilizes martial scenery:

      'One who is not welcome by her in-laws, and who has not place at her parents' house; and whose spouse does not care an iota for her, is she truly a happily married wife?'
      -Salok 31, ASGGS, Ang. 1379. 

      The 'parents' house' symbolizes societal life, the 'in-laws' spiritual life and the 'spouse' the Lord. Bhagat Farid is commenting on those spiritualists, those devotees, who desire the best of both spiritualism and societal living. He feels that by pursuing both concepts, one ultimately fails in all that he/she commits to. Guru Nanak Dev Ji comments:

      'At her in-laws and at her parents' house, she belongs to her spouse, the Divine beloved who is inaccessible and unfathomable. Oh Nanak! That one is indeed a happily married bride, who pleases the indifferent one.'
      -Mohalla 1, Salok 32, ASGGS, Ang. 1379.

      In contrast to Farid, the Guru elaborates that via Divine Grace both the temporal and spiritual paradigms become successful for the devotees. The true spiritualist is one who pursues both fields rather than renouncing one over the other. Nonetheless, hypocrisy in both fields should be avoided."   "In Suhi Lalit, Bhagat Farid forewarns:

      'You could not construct a raft when required. Now that the ocean is full and overflowing, it is hard to traverse. Do not touch the saffron flower for it's color will depart, my beloved. Rahau.
      The bride is weak and her husband's command is too hard to bear. As the milk does not return to her breast, nor will the soul return to the body. Sayeth Farid, friends, when the spouse calls this soul departeth crestfallen and the body is reduced to ashes.'
      -Suhi Lalit 1, ASGGS, Ang. 794.

      Guru Nanak Dev Ji, prior to Farid's verse, expounds:

      'Make meditation and restraint the raft via which to traverse the flowing stream. Your pass will be comfortable as if there is no ocean or overflowing stream. Your name alone is the unfading matter with which this cloak is dyed; my Beloved Lord, this color is perennial. My dear companions have departed, how will they meet the Lord? If they are united in virtue, the Lord will unite them with himself. Once united the mortal does not separate if the union be true. The cycle of birth and death is nullified by the True, Eternal Lord. She who removes her own self-centrism sews herself a garment to please her spouse. By the Guru's words, she obtained the fruit of the nectar of the Lord's word. Sayeth Nanak, my companions, my spouse be dear to me. We be the Lord's handmaidens; he our husband.'
      -Mohalla 1, Suhi 4, Ang. 729.

      Bhagat Farid provides a picture of doom and gloom by lamenting lost opportunities. He focuses on old age, where mental and physical faculties are too frail to be attuned to Divine contemplation. Guru Nanak Dev Ji, instead, expounds that it is never too late to focus on the Lord (one should remember Guru Amardass Ji here) for the Beloved is not harsh nor his commands. Via the saffron flower, Bhagat Farid warns of the fleeting pleasures of the world -here today, gone tomorrow- Guru Nanak Dev Ji instead elaborates that all pleasures belong to the Lord and via merging with him, all pleasures become permanent for he is the highest pleasure of all. 

      For Farid, death is the final test; even the faithful, in his view, should fear it for the soul never returns to the body. Guru Nanak Dev Ji however believes death to be a joy and a privilege of the valorous, for it is via death that one perfects his/her union with the Divine.

      From a Nanakian perspective, Farids's words apply to the manmukh and not the Gurmukh. But even a manmukh is worthy of Divine Grace, provided he recants at the ultimate moment."   "Bhagat Farid, a Sufi, informs us:

      'My physical frame is oven-hot; my bones are the firewood. If my feet fail, I shall walk upon my head to meet my Beloved.'
      -Salok 119, ASGGS, Ang. 1384.

      Bhagat Farid utilizes the metaphor of a kiln to depict his love for the Lord. A Sufi, his ascetic concepts however were not in line with Gurmat. Guru Nanak Dev Ji refutes his call for such asceticism by commenting:

      'Do not heat your physical frame oven-hot; burn not your bones like firewood. What harm have they committed that you torture them such? Rather behold the Beloved within your soul, Farid.'
      -Salok 120, ASGGS, Ang. 1384.

      Bhagat Farid is of the mind that the human body is but a prison and the soul it's captive. The Sikh Gurus believe that the human body is a temple, a locus where the Lord resides and awaits his devotee. By utilizing this Shabad of Farid, the Gurus desired that their Sikhs imbue the same zeal as the Sufi did whilst also discarding his asceticism; hence the refutation. Throughout Bhagat Bani we find a similar concept at play. The Sikh Gurus initiate a written dialogue with the radicals of their time and provide an unalloyed picture of the Divine Truth. For Farid, creation is a falsity; for the Gurus it is a truth. Farid's asceticism renders the body as simply an object; the Gurus however perceive it to be divine and encourage their Sikhs to employ it in the service of the Divine by societal living." I printed all this out in pamphlet form and took it to a local Nagar Kirtan when I was in Australia and man, some of the Muslims burned. A few confrontations occurred, "how can you say Guru Nanak was a non-Muslim?!" "Gobind Singh made you anti-Muslim." "Your history is a lie, all Gurus were Muslims and they even married Muslims!" Basically they were clutching at straws. The pamphlets were enough to make the Sikhs ignore these idiots and they grew worried and left the scene. Later a famous attendant Gyani, from Taksal (and who I will not name), got hold of one of the pamphlets. After having it explained to him he called me over and asked me what jatha I belonged to. I told him none. Then he asked me where I got this information from. I told him my sources. Basically his problem was that I was not crediting any jatha on my pamphlet. He asked me to mention Taksal in them but I refused. Few days later all the pamphlets were thrown in the trash and I was told to abstain from publishing such (and here's how they described them) lies. The youth wanted more, but the Gurughar committee would have none of it. The main problem, here, is the liberal fuddu attitude our qaum has that respect all faiths at the expense of your own.  After this some of us decided to stick to the social media. There was veer Bijla Singh Ji with his Search Sikhism page which, back in the heyday of grooming, forced several Muslim preachers to quit their anti-Sikh proselytizing. There were a few more who set up Tisarpanth. Then there was The Truth of Sikhi and Shamshir Publications. Bijla Singh Ji advised us but out of the three initiatives set up, only one is going strong and the others were forced to close down. Why? Because they had to hit the streets and they faced the same problem which I did- our own elders were and still are shooting us down. If we had claimed affiliation with some jatha, then we would have been lionized.   
    • In that way you're right. It is a big deal. My heart would pain to see anyone lost to Islam especially on a large scale. And your cautionary message is well founded.  But in the fake news, shame Sikhi, propaganda way I feel it was being used. Pfft. In that context I feel more a response of "And? Big deal. Who gives a ****"
    • That's her father in law Tarsem Singh of Hushiarpur, he is the village Granthi.   Her father's name is Monohar Lal of Delhi and her name is Kiran Bala. Sikhs don't have names like Lal and Bala. These are typical Hindu names.
    • I'm surprised to learn there are differences in Bani. If Ram rai can be excommunicated for changing the meaning of a verse (to please the emporer), then it should be impossible for a Sikh to change the words or spellings of Bani. Apart from layout differences (which would occur due to variations in handwriting style and page size), the Bani should be identical in all versions. To allow variations can lead to questioning the authenticity and hence validity of Bani.    Yes it can lead to attacks from without by muslims and others looking to destroy Sikhs faith in Bani, but it can also lead to disruption from within. 
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