Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
cgy99100

is it a myth or is it true regarding hari singh nalwa

90 posts in this topic

is it true afghan mothers would scare their kids saying hari singh nalwa will come and get them or is it a sikh myth

cause which part of current afghanistan did the sikhs conquere for afghan mothers to use hari singh nalwa's name

cause i notice granthis at the gurdwara talk about stuff like this but then its sad cause if these guys havn't studied history what gives them the right to try and teaching something they have no knowledge about at the gurdwara

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the granthi made a claim that hari singh nalwa conquered all of afghanistan and americans and nato are unable to conquere afghanistan

these guys who try teaching history in the gurdwara yet never studied it themselves are they the reason why most sikh youth have no idea about sikhism or their history cause sikh history is amazing and full of military accomplishments but lot of sikhs dont' know about the real military accomplishments but they know about fabricated stories

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is fac why pathans wear salwar kurta:

Hari Singh Nalwa was the Commander-in-chief at the most turbulent North West Frontier of Ranjit Singh's kingdom. He took the frontier of the Sarkar Khalsaji to the very mouth of the Khyber Pass. For the past eight centuries, marauders, who had indulged in looting, plunder, rape, and forcible conversions to Islam had used this route into the subcontinent. In his lifetime, Hari Singh became a terror to the ferocious tribes inhabiting these regions. He successfully thwarted the last foreign invasion into the subcontinent through the Khyber Pass at Jamrud, permanently blocking this route of the invaders. Even in his death, Hari Singh Nalwa's formidable reputation ensured victory for the Sikhs against an Afghan force five times as numerous.

In accordance with the teaching of their Guru, the Sikhs did not attack the defenceless or the weak. This included children, women, mendicants and the elderly. Sardar Hari Singh Nalwa advised the Pathans that one way they could escape the wrath of an infuriated Sikh was to dress as a woman. In the Punjab, the shalwar kameez is feminine apparel.

The shalwar was a loose trouser with a stiff border at the ankle, while the kameez was a loose shirt falling to the knees. This dress came to popularly be known as the ‘Punjabi suit’ in India. In Pakistan and Afghanistan, men still wear its variant — the ‘Pathan suit’.

Milkha Singh of Gurdwara Darshani Deohri Amritsar, first narrated this story to the author. Many others corroborated it since.

(Source: Nalwa, V. 2009. Hari Singh Nalwa - The Champion of Khalsaji New Delhi: Manohar, p. 264)

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follow up of the above post: Pakistani Denies but one confirms

The twenty-first century, the Wali of Swat confirmed that the above was indeed a fact:

The following is the gist of an open letter written by Miangul Aurangzeb, the present Wali of Swat, to the Taliban when the Taliban were preaching and enforcing strict dress and conduct codes for the women in the areas that fell under their control.

"At the outset I want to record that you all must love me very much as you have decided not to take over my property in Swat unlike those you have taken over of other landed families. I am therefore emboldened to believe that I have the privilege of sharing some historical facts for you to know about and I urge you to absorb the same before you continue your campaign of moral policing, especially when it comes to the manner of dressing and code of conduct for women.

The Sikh army of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, under the leadership of Hari Singh Nalwa came to the Frontier in the 1820's and swiftly conquered our ancestors. It is the only time in recorded history that our people were ruled over by foreigners. The locals were so utterly terrified of the Sikh army that they used to hide every time the Sikhs came into view. Those that decided to resist were met with ruthlessness. During this time, the word was spread around that the Sikhs did not harm elderly people, women and children and that the local men who did not wish to earn wrath of the Sikhs should wear the garb of Punjabi women, which was the Salwar-Kameez. At that time in our history both men and women alike, wore only a single-robe garment (similar to that worn by the Arabs) and the Sikhs would not harm any man either when wearing the Salwar-Kameez.

So you see, our men happily adopted the garb of Punjabi women since they were too terrified to stand up and they have adopted the garb as being theirs' ever since. I am very intrigued to see that you are following in the footsteps of your ancestors by wearing the adopted Punjabi women's garb as your own, but now go around preaching and coercing our women as to how they should be living their lives! I suggest that take a deep look inside yourselves, given this historical perspective."

Sincerely,

Miangul Aurangzeb, Wali of Swat

(Source: Nishaan, Swat: Sanctuary for the Sikhs, III/2009, New Delhi: Nagaara Trust, p. 45)
-------------------------------

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

did you copy and paste that from http://www.defence.pk/forums/military-history-strategy/177048-how-fear-sardar-hari-singh-nalwa-forced-pashtuns-start-wearing-salwar.html

theirs a whole debate going on regarding those claims on that website

without a doubt nari singh nalwa and the sikhs conquered peshawar which is part of the great military accomplishments but sikhs need to research and find evidence to claims rather then believe things someone says without evidence

in court you'll have one side making an accusation and another side playing defence the prosecuters have to provide evidence to back up their claim beyond a reasonable doubt

gurdeepsinghjohal to you believe things blindly cause someone made a claim or do you look for evidence to back up the claim and try seeing the other side of the story as well to find the truth

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pathan mothers use the phrase 'Haria Raghale' (Hari Singh Nalwa will get you!) to frighten their children into doing their biding akin to Hari Singh Nalwa being regarded as the Bogey-Man in popular culture. Nalwa was governor of Peshawar which the Sikhs had captured. This city was then known as 'the pride of the Afghans' and the province known as Dar ul Aman ie Abode of Peace, not because it was peaceful, but because the Pathans saw it as some sort of garden of Eden as the valley was fertile and the revenue was higher than anywhere else in Afghanistan ( which the areas West of Indus in those days were regarded as a part of). By taking Peshawar and controlling the Khyber Pass, the Singhs demonstrated their dominance over Afghanistan. Yet the Singhs were shrewd enough to not get too carried away and advance further because the expense of having to garrison a turbulent country that produced a pittence in revenue was not worth it. Nalwa was a tough governor and often used harsh and opressive methods which may have been more appropriate for such times - who knows? For instance the call to prayer was banned from mosques and if this was breached the Maulvi would be hung from the minerets. Local tribal rogues were fastened over ant hills and honey was poured over them resulting in a slow and terrifying death. It was not unknown for Singhs to capture women and children of the enemy during raids. All said, he apparently had a reputation for justice by the locals and was known as a King Solomon like figure amongst the Pathans. He spoke Pashtu fluently and thus enamoured himself more easily with the local populace. One of his wives at least was a Pathan woman. Later, after his death in 1839 when the Sikhs provided a force to help the British with their first Afghan war, Jalalabad was captured and retained.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

didn't hari singh nalwa pass away in 1837 and wasn't it the british east indian company along with shah shuaja who went on to conquere afghanistan but after a year the british saw afghanistan to poor of a country to make money off of so cut down number of soldiers 4000 and cause of so few soldiers shah shauja was overthrown and about 100 000 pashtun tribe men attacked and killed all but one of the 4000 soldiers and their familys never heard of the sikhs helping the british in the first anglo afghan war but sikhs probably did allow them to pass through the lands owned by the khalsa to invade afghanistan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nalwa was killed in battle in 1837 and prior to this the trans Indus territories of Afghanistan that fell under the Peshawar province, the Derajat and Waziri territories had been assimilated into Khalsa territory and now the de facto Afghan border lay further west, at the Khyber pass. In 1839 the British wanted to restore Shah Shuja to his ancestoral seat in Kabul and by ousting Dost Mohammad, they would have a friendly Afghan State, rather than one that was courting with Iran and Russia. Maharaja Ranjit Singh agreed to allow a British force through his territories in exchange for gaining Jalalabad which the Brits were not so keen on, but relented. Shah Shuja came with a British force to Kabul via Quetta ie outside of Punjab. His son, Shahzada Taimur and a smaller British force went via Lahore and at Peshawar was joined by A Sikh force. The Sikhs were instrumental in forcing the other side of the Khyber pass en route to Kabul. This joyous news came to the ears of Maharaja Ranjit Singh on his death bed.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes it is copy paste.

That is why I posted in two parts first one account of Granthi.

Second one is pakistani.

Moreover it is interesting it is posted in pak defence site.

It can be checked if salwaar kamiz was because of Hari Singh Nalwa or from other people who invaded Afghanistan. Just have to read history of Asia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nalwa was killed in battle in 1837 and prior to this the trans Indus territories of Afghanistan that fell under the Peshawar province, the Derajat and Waziri territories had been assimilated into Khalsa territory and now the de facto Afghan border lay further west, at the Khyber pass. In 1839 the British wanted to restore Shah Shuja to his ancestoral seat in Kabul and by ousting Dost Mohammad, they would have a friendly Afghan State, rather than one that was courting with Iran and Russia. Maharaja Ranjit Singh agreed to allow a British force through his territories in exchange for gaining Jalalabad which the Brits were not so keen on, but relented. Shah Shuja came with a British force to Kabul via Quetta ie outside of Punjab. His son, Shahzada Taimur and a smaller British force went via Lahore and at Peshawar was joined by A Sikh force. The Sikhs were instrumental in forcing the other side of the Khyber pass en route to Kabul. This joyous news came to the ears of Maharaja Ranjit Singh on his death bed.

Very correctly stated.Peshawer was a province of afghanistan and had never been separated.It is Hari Singh Nalwa who conquered it

Built fort jamraud at gate of khyber pass. Since then peshawer has been taken away from afghanistan.

It is a fact that when mothers in our punjab say to crying child keep quiet otherwise lion will come. It is also a fact that afgham mothers

say in pashtu to crying children " Chup sho haria ragle" (Keep quiet otherwise hari singh nalwa will take you away).

Note: Maharaja ranjit singh died in 1837.hari singh died before that when peshawer was already a province of khalsa(4th province) and hari singh nalwa was its Governor. Abbotabad's where osama bin laden was killed real name was haripur and part of peshawer province. That district is known as haripur hazara.

Shah shuja had taken asylum at lahore under ranjit singh and Ranjit took away kohinoor from him.

Edited by GPS
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In accordance with the teaching of their Guru, the Sikhs did not attack the defenceless or the weak. This included children, women, mendicants and the elderly. Sardar Hari Singh Nalwa advised the Pathans that one way they could escape the wrath of an infuriated Sikh was to dress as a woman. In the Punjab, the shalwar kameez is feminine apparel.

The shalwar was a loose trouser with a stiff border at the ankle, while the kameez was a loose shirt falling to the knees. This dress came to popularly be known as the ‘Punjabi suit’ in India. In Pakistan and Afghanistan, men still wear its variant — the ‘Pathan suit’.

its just one of those things that have come up like how people say whoever attacked Sri Darbar Sahib never lived more than 180 days stuff.

The poathans could equally claim that they made panjabi men wear womens clothes. Its just the flip side of the coin.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gsp actually maharaja ranjit singh died in 1839

and besides peshawar which is a city of 3 million people making up only 1.5% of the pathan population how did conquering this city of peshawar send fear into all afghan mothers

if the sikhs accompanied the indian soldiers of the british east india company led by the english isn't the conquest of afghanistan still creditied to the british and not the indians or sikhs or if sikhs get credit then isn't it equal to saying that india or indians conquered afghanistan in 1839

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

with city of peshawar what other regions that the pathans called home did the sikhs conquere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the tribal regions of pakistan are the home to the pathans but what part did the british conquere after the second anglo afghan war were the afghans surrendered some of their land and allowed the british to control their foreign policy to keep russia in check cause russia had eyes on india and the brits could of controlled all of afghanistan but once again it wasn't good for buis since maintaining afghanistan costed more money then they made off of afghanistan so cause of afghanistan's poverty they just settled for some of their territory's and control of their foreign policy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact is that Hari Singh Nalwa's military exploits divided the Pathan people between those who are now in Pakistan and those in Afghanistan. Prior to the Sikhs, the Afghan ruled Kashmir, Derajat and parts of Sindh. Taking Kashmir and Derajat off the Afghans may have hurt their self esteem but it did not affect then mentally as the loss of Peshawar did. For the first time in history the Muslim Pathans were being ruled by a non-Muslim people. Prior to the Soviet invasion in 1979, the Afghan government used to claim the Peshawar area as a part of Afghanistan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"cgy99100"

Have you been to a Muslim/Afghan/Pathaan forum to find out what they say about Sikhs based on history?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what pathan homelands in pakistan were conquered by hari singh nalwa and which pathan homelands in pakistan were conquered by the british

peshawar has 3 million people so 6% pathan population in total

what other lands of the pathans did hari singh nalwa conquere and what evidence is their by conquering 6% of the pathan population

that all pathans got scared and all afghan mothers got scared and used hari singh nalwa name to scare their kids

Edited by cgy99100

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He served as the Governor of Kashmir (1820–21), Greater Hazara (1822–1837) and was twice appointed the Governor of Peshawar (1834-5 & 1836-his death).

The territories under his jurisdiction later formed part of the British Districts of Peshawar, Hazara (Pakhli, Damtaur, Haripur, Darband, Gandhgarh, Dhund, Karral and Khanpur), Attock (Chhachch, Hassan Abdal), Jehlum (Pindi Gheb, Katas), Mianwali (Kachhi), Shahpur (Warcha, Mitha Tiwana and Nurpur), Dera Ismail Khan (Bannu, Tank, and Kundi), Rawalpindi (Rawalpindi, Kallar) and Gujranwala. In 1832, at the specific request of William Bentinck, the Maharajah proposed a fixed table of duties for the whole of his territories. Sardar Hari Singh Nalwa was one of the three men deputed to fix the duties from Attock (on the Indus) to Filor (on the Satluj)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hari_Singh_Nalwa

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"cgy99100"

Have you been to a Muslim/Afghan/Pathaan forum to find out what they say about Sikhs based on history?

what do they say about sikh history

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a whole page on Wikipedia detailing his conquests.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sayyed Mohd. Lateef, in the "History of the Punjab writes;-"Such was the dread in which the Afghans held him, that to this day the name 'Haria' is repeated by mothers in Peshawar and its neighborhood in frightening their children."


harisingh.jpg


The editor of the <banned word filter activated> Bits newspaper of England wrote in one of his columns around 1881:-"Some people might think that Napoleon was a great General. Some might name Marshall Hendenburgh, Lord Kitchener, General Karobzey or Duke of Wellington etc. And some going further might say Halaku Khan, Changez Khan, Richard or Allaudin etc. But let me tell you that in the North of India a General of the name of Hari Singh Nalwa of the Sikhs prevailed. Had he lived longer and had the sources and artillery of the British, he would have conquered most of Asia and Europe…."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cgy99100, why u get upset and cringe when you hear the true facts of sikh raj. Most of our history is yet hidden and not researched yet.

Get over with it and whether u believe it or not, history ain't gonna change on ur wild assumptions.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conquering Afghanistan: What The West Can Learn From India

facebook.png

google.pngmyspace.pngtechnorati.pngsubscribe_rss.png

Afghanistan_2_by_FlappyJack-300x199.jpgBy Rakesh Krishnan

If there’s one thing that really gets me worked up, it is this: the western media keeps peddling the fairy tale that no power – from Alexander 2300 years ago to Britain in the 19th century and Russia 30 years ago – was able to conquer Afghanistan. To me it reeks of ignorance, and reporters in western countries have exhibited a lot of that. Remember, this is the same bunch that devoted reams of newsprint to the lie that al-Qaeda was getting help from Iraq, when in reality Iraq under Saddam Hussein was the most secular in West Asia.

But how could experienced and Pulitzer Prize winning writers ignore facts? Don’t they have armies of researchers at their beck and call? Also, newspapers like the NYT and The Guardian have excellent research departments that can dig out the region’s history!

The truth is that just 180 years ago Maharajah Ranjit Singh (1799-1839) and his brilliant commander Hari Singh Nalwa defeated the Afghans and the tribes of the Khyber Pass area, in the process securing India’s north west border. Had it not been for Ranjit Singh, Peshawar and the north-west frontier provinces of India (now in Pakistan) would have been part of Afghanistan today.

But first a flashback: Afghanistan had always been a part of India; it was called Gandhar, from which the modern Kandahar originates. It was a vibrant province that gave us excellent art, architecture, literature and scientific knowledge – a world far removed from today’s Taliban infested badlands.

It was an Indian province until 1735 when Nadir Shah of Iran emboldened by the weakness of the later Mughals ransacked Delhi and everything on the way. This was a highly opportunistic and reckless act because for the past 25 centuries India and Iran had respected each other’s borders, and though always a bit nervous of each other, the two empires never tried to subvert each other. But because of his greed Nadir Shah hanged the equation. He annexed Afghanistan and asked the Indians to forget about ever getting it back.

However, Ranjit Singh was not prepared to play according to the Persian script. Nadir Shah’s successor, Ahmad Shah Abdali, had been launching repeated raids into Punjab and Delhi. To check this Ranjit Singh decided to build a modern and powerful army with the employment of Frenchmen, Italians, Greeks, Russians, Germans and Austrians. Two of the foreign officers who entered the Maharaja’s service, Ventura and Allard, had served under Napoleon. Says historian Shiv Kumar Gupta: “All these officers were basically engaged by Ranjit Singh for modernisation of his troops. He never put them in supreme command.”

After conquering Multan in 1818 and Kashmir in 1819, Ranjit Singh led his legions across the Indus and took Dera Ghazi Khan in 1820 and Dera Ismail Khan in 1821. Alarmed, the Afghans called for a jehad under the leadership of Azim Khan Burkazi, the ruler of Kabul. A big Afghan army collected on the bank of the Kabul River at Naushehra, but Ranjit Singh won a decisive victory and the Afghans were dispersed in 1823. Peshawar was subdued in 1834.

The Afghans and Pathans had always considered themselves superior to the people on the Indian side. They especially looked down upon Indian Muslims and contemptuously referred to them as Hindko. The fact that the Indians were superior in all respects – wealth, culture, literature, art – mattered little to them, as physical stature was the only basis for this peacock-like strutting. Says historian Kirpal Singh, “The pride of the Afghans and Pathans was pricked for the first time as they had been defeated by the Sikhs whom they considered infidels. Undoubtedly, they were agitated and used to say Khalsa Hum Khuda Shuda (Khalsa too has become believer of God).”

So how did Ranjit Singh manage to conquer such fierce mountain people? Mainly by using a blend of sustained aggression latter smoothened by Indian magnanimity. Of course, his biggest weapon was the scourge of the Afghans –Hari Singh Nalwa, who in one battle defeated 20,000 Hazaras. To defeat the cunning and fierce Hazaras on their treacherous home turf was no mean feat but to do that with only 7000 men was the stuff of legend.

Indeed, Hari Singh had become a legend. He realised that to dominate the warlike tribes, the ikhs had to give them the same treatment the Afghans had given the Indians in the past. According to Kirpal Singh, “Hari Singh set up a very strong administration in the Peshawar valley. He levied a cess of Rs 4 per house on the Yusafzais. This cess was to be collected in cash or in kind. For its

realisation, personal household property could be appropriated. There was scarcely avillage that was not burnt. In such awe were his visitations held that Hari Singh Nalwa’s name was used by Afghan mothers as a term of fright to hush their unruly children.”

Though the spell of Afghan supremacy was broken, the region predominantly populated by turbulent and warlike Muslim tribes could not be securely held unless a large army was permanently stationed there. A force of 12,000 men was posted with Hari Singh to quell any sign of turbulence and to realise the revenue. “The terror of the name of the Khalsa resounded in the valley,” says Kirpal Singh. “Part of the city of Peshawar was burnt and the residence of the governor at Bala Hissar was razed to the ground.”

Ranjit Singh ensured that the Afghans never again became a threat to India. The wild tribes of Swat and Khyber were also tamed. These are the same people who massacred British armies, and against whom the Americans and Pakistanis are now struggling.

There are three reasons why Ranjit Singh won a decisive victory and in Afghanistan and the northwest while the West is floundering.

First, terror tactics were followed by a period of liberal and secular Sikh rule. In fact, secularism was the defining character of Ranjit Singh’s rule. There was no state religion, and religious tolerance was an article of his faith. He refused to treat Muslims like second class citizens. Compare this with the callous strafing of wedding parties by US and European troops or the Nazi

uniforms being worn by Czech troops.

When his victorious army passed through the streets of Peshawar, the maharajah issued strict instructions to his sardars to observe restraint in keeping with the Sikh tradition, not to damage any mosque, not to insult any woman and not to destroy any crops.

Two, like the NATO forces in Afghanistan today, Ranjit Singh’s army was a coalition too. The Indian king’s forces were made up of Sikhs and Hindus, while the artillery almost fully comprised Muslims (as the Sikhs and Hindus thought it below their dignity to serve in this new wing of the military). Over half a dozen European nations are assisting US troops just as European specialists worked for Ranjit Singh. Also, for the first time in Indian history, Mazhabis, for centuries considered untouchables, become a regular component of the army.

However, there is a key difference – Ranjit’s Singh’s forces worked like clockwork with one aim in mind and that was to secure the empire. Today, the US is reluctant to do all the fighting, the British forces are simply not up to the task of taking on the fierce Afghans and relies on bribes to keep away the Taliban fighters. Which Afghan will show his opponent respect if they bribe them

not to shoot? The Ukrainians, Poles, Australians, New Zealanders, Czechs, and who knows how many more nationalities, are present in Afghanistan clearly to curry favour with America and wrap up their respective free trade agreements. Nobody, it seems, has the balls to take on the Afghans, except from 30,000 ft in the air.

Around 30 years ago, the Russian general Nikolai Ogarkov advised Leonid Brezhnev’s cabinet not to invade Afghanistan, saying that the country was unconquerable; today NATO generals are asking Barack Obama to get out of the place or else the Americans will have to leave in the same state as they left Vietnam – in their underpants. But Hari Singh and Ranjit Singh showed how a

mixture of ferocity, valour and compassion could tame Afghanistan. And that’s the third reason: at the end of the day, the Indians just did a much better job of fighting.

Rakesh Krishnan is a features writer at Fairfax New Zealand. He has previously worked with Business world, India Today and Hindustan Times, and was news editor with the Financial Express.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wikipedia isn't a great research tool and banned from colleges and on wikipedia only mentions peshawar the land pathans called home that sikhs conquered i was hoping if someone could list some more territories conquered by the sikhs that pathans call home

sikhistan im not affected by true facts regarding the sikh raj actually im proud of their accomplishments but theirs a difference between fairy tale stories like men fighting battles with their head in one hand and sword in other or one sikh can take on 125 000 men at once

im not changing history and if most of the history hasn't bin researched and is unknown then how do you know what is fact and what is fiction regarding sikh history

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0