Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RAJ

Depression And Suicide

Recommended Posts

Kaur-nect is a free specialist telephone support service, dedicated to helping Sikh females of all ages suffering various forms of mental and physical abuse. Help is available via one-to-one mentoring, offering individualised advice support and guidance, to support victims overcome a spectrum of challenges and hardships facing them in their lives. Forms of abuse can range from domestic physical and sexual abuse to peer pressure and bullying; what sets Kaur-nect apart from other female support services is the ethos of Gurmat which underpins its fostering approach to help victims overcome their difficulties. The helpline is manned by a pool of professional Sikh (female) volunteers, who offer their time to build and nurture confidence and capacity within victims, in accordance with the principles of Sikhi, to assist them in making life-informed decisions. The service is completely confidential to all callers, irrespective of age and personal status.

Contact us on facebook/Twitter or email us on kaurnect@kaurageous.com, OR telephone call us on our helpline 07783833364 and one of the sewdaars will contact you asap Just please give us at least 24hours notice...

Thank you

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thread. I'm a Singhni who's always been able to pull herself out of down states in the face adverse situations... but for the last few weeks I have been suffering from clinical depression for the first time in my life. It is entirely different to anything I've experienced.

A mental change means that I can't "pull myself out" of sadness, and logical reasoning won't make any difference to my down state. I'm not suicidal, but I can see how my thinking has changed and my mind has taken to a rather negative disposition. Now I'll be going to my GP to get advice, probably on how to raise the serotonin levels in my brain.

Maybe interestingly, I've not told anyone about this problem. I know there's a stigma attached to depression and people seem to belittle it, thinking it to be no more than a sad state that you can pull yourself out of. People don't understand. So those with depression have to try to fight it alone... it's not right.

Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking, you can see a counsellor who will be able to talk through your emotions and how did the depression kicked in itself. The counsellor will be able to establish the key areas of how depression started and walk you through it by therapeutic work which can be a way of talking through your problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest KG

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

No offence, but you have very little insight and empathy. I feel sorry for anyone who reads your post and doesn't feel able to 'snap out of it' because its just not that simple. Benti, to those out there that do feel emotionally low, there are people out there that want to help you to help yourself (and not for the selfish reasons the poster above claims).

Isnt if funny how you speak of vampire parasites yet you're doing a masters aren't you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

this is probably the worst post ive seen on this whole forum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly WSL has no clue what he is talking about, but he seems to think that he is an expert on the matter. Did that come off as a shock? It shouldn't have as the post is very much in line with how he normally posts.

Come to think of it, such behaviour runs rampant in our culture. I am talking about a high level of ego seen in Punjabi people who have higher level of education. I have lost count of how many times I have seen this with my very own eyes. I do always say, 'parai naal akal ni aundi'.

Edited by HDSH
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

Dude, your posts used to be rude, but now they are getting to a point of being insensitive and in some cases even hurtful towards those who seem to be in pain. And I agree with HDSH, its not one single bit surprising.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waheguru Jee Ka Khalsa Waheguru Jee Kee Fateh

West London Singh

We took you off Quality Control with the hope that the quality and level of your posts will improve. We do not want to put you under Quality Control yet again, hence consider this as a reminder to watch your tone when typing. To make it easy, put yourself in the place of the person who you're responding to and then write what your heart tells you to. You're known to put people down when responding to their posts. This will not be tolerated at Sikhsangat.com. Consider this your last warning.

Sikhsangat ADMIN team

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • it's my fault, i should have phrased things a bit better. Basically based on the data he gathered same sex couples are more likely to settle into a routine and are less likely to do things out of said routine (such as cheating, which according to the data he gathered was surprisingly low compared to straight couples). By similar attributes I mean people like them in terms of personality and taste. In straight couples you can usually note a sort of polarity in the way they behave and their personalities.  Again this is based on one study, nothing official or on a large scale really.
    • Overthinking : The art of creating problems that weren't even there."
      Maturity: is learning to walk away from people and situations that threaten your peace of mind, self-respect, values, morals or self worth.
      "Sometimes walking away is the only option. Not because you want to make someone miss you, or realize they took you for granted. But because you finally respect yourself enough to know that you deserve better."   About expectations
      "When you learn to accept instead of expect, you will have fewer disappointments."
    •   "Pause and remember" Forgiving someone does not make you a weak person. Forgiving someone does not mean you have to have that person in your life. Forgiving allows you to release the anger, resentment and hurt. Forgiveness breaks the chains to your past and sets you free." — Jenni Young     "When you are unforgiving and carry animosity, you feed the very soul of conflict that keeps your pain alive. If you suffocate your heart with anger, all your dreams will die. The only way to allow your soul to freely breathe, is to forgive." — Bryant McGill     "Forgive anyone who has caused you pain or harm. Keep in mind that forgiving is not for others. It is for you. Forgiving is not forgetting. It is remembering without anger. It frees up your power, heals your body, mind and spirit. Forgiveness opens up a pathway to a new place of peace where you can persist despite what has happened to you."  Les Brown  
    • 5 Cancer Fighting Foods Backed By Scientific Research by Anthony Gucciardi When we talk about the idea of taking back control in your life, it is absolutely essential that we talk about one of life's most important fundamentals: your health. The truth is, you most certainly can eat your way to optimum health – and it can actually be a very enjoyable (and delicious) experience. Here's 5 cancer fighting foods that are backed by scientific research to start adding into your daily optimum health routine: 1. Tea Enjoying a cup of tea is anything but a chore, and the reality is that plant-based teas can offer some very significant anti-cancer properties. Tea contains a family of natural compounds known as flavonoids, which are the phytonutrients responsible for the beautiful colors we see in fruits and vegetables. But in addition to playing a role in the vivid colorization of produce, flavonoids are also known for their powerful antioxidant effects. In particular, a flavonoid in tea called kaempferol has been pegged to help in the fight against cancer. According to an expansive Harvard University study that studied more than 66,000 women, participants who consumed more kaempferol were found to have the lowest rates of ovarian cancer. 2. Brussels Sprouts Brussels sprouts are the new kale, with various brussels-based recipes and preparation ideas popping up on social media almost daily. This happens to be a very beneficial trend, as eating brussels sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables (cabbage, broccoli, kale, cauliflower) can be an excellent choice in the fight against cancer and your journey towards optimum health. What's interesting about the research here is that scientists were able to identify some inspiring protective properties against both prostate and colon cancers with the consumption of cruciferous vegetables, but the substances required to produce the results may only be released during the cutting or chewing of the vegetables. One study, as reported by WebMD, found that: “In mice grafted with human prostate tumors and then treated with one of these cancer-killing substances, tumors began to shrink to half their size after 31 days.“ The promising results may have to do with the enzyme phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), which is found naturally in cruciferous vegetables. Other studies have examined the antioxidant called sulforaphane, which is also released when you chew up cruciferous vegetables. 3. Turmeric If you haven't already started spicing up your meals with turmeric, now is the time to start. As a member of the ginger family, the turmeric plant has been used in both Indian cuisine and ancient schools of medicine for thousands of years. Now, quite some time later, researchers and nutritionists are finally getting excited about what turmeric can do. One such study that gained recent notoriety in the news cycle focused on the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin (turmeric's active ingredient) on the body. Published in the Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston found that curcumin exhibited anti-inflammatory capabilities that could help in the fight against cancer and most other disease. "Most diseases are caused by chronic inflammation that persists over long periods of time," wrote biochemist Bharat B. Aggarwal, PhD, from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. 4. Black Raspberries Yet another great tasting option, berries have been shown to help in the fight against one of America's most deadly conditions. In particular, black raspberries may be the best bet. It has been found that black raspberries contain a significant amount of phytochemicals known as anthocyanins, which could help to halt or slow the development of premalignant cells. One professor of internal medicine at The Ohio State University College of Medicine has even authored a book titled “Berries and Cancer Prevention” which details all of the ways in which berries wage war against cancer growth. 5. Vitamin D Not a 'food' per se, but vitamin D is such a uniquely important anti-cancer agent that it is a must-have in your arsenal against cancer. The research here is pretty clear, and even the National Cancer Institute has a lengthy page dedicated to vitamin D and its effects. In research surrounding cancer cells and tumors in mice, vitamin D was discovered to potentially slow or prevent the onset of cancer, inhibit cancer cell growth, reduce tumor vessel formation, and more. Addition pieces of literature focused on the association between vitamin D levels and death rates for some cancers. Participants living in areas with a higher amount of sunlight exposure were found to have lower rates of these cancers, which researchers stated could be due to the difference in vitamin D levels. Taking control of your health is more than just important, it's essential to living the life that you deserve to create for yourself. Adding these foods and others into your daily routine can be a step in the right direction towards securing your optimum state of health. Sources: Harvard Gazette Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology National Cancer Institute Berries and Cancer Prevention by Gary D. Stoner  
×