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Depression And Suicide

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Kaur-nect is a free specialist telephone support service, dedicated to helping Sikh females of all ages suffering various forms of mental and physical abuse. Help is available via one-to-one mentoring, offering individualised advice support and guidance, to support victims overcome a spectrum of challenges and hardships facing them in their lives. Forms of abuse can range from domestic physical and sexual abuse to peer pressure and bullying; what sets Kaur-nect apart from other female support services is the ethos of Gurmat which underpins its fostering approach to help victims overcome their difficulties. The helpline is manned by a pool of professional Sikh (female) volunteers, who offer their time to build and nurture confidence and capacity within victims, in accordance with the principles of Sikhi, to assist them in making life-informed decisions. The service is completely confidential to all callers, irrespective of age and personal status.

Contact us on facebook/Twitter or email us on kaurnect@kaurageous.com, OR telephone call us on our helpline 07783833364 and one of the sewdaars will contact you asap Just please give us at least 24hours notice...

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Good thread. I'm a Singhni who's always been able to pull herself out of down states in the face adverse situations... but for the last few weeks I have been suffering from clinical depression for the first time in my life. It is entirely different to anything I've experienced.

A mental change means that I can't "pull myself out" of sadness, and logical reasoning won't make any difference to my down state. I'm not suicidal, but I can see how my thinking has changed and my mind has taken to a rather negative disposition. Now I'll be going to my GP to get advice, probably on how to raise the serotonin levels in my brain.

Maybe interestingly, I've not told anyone about this problem. I know there's a stigma attached to depression and people seem to belittle it, thinking it to be no more than a sad state that you can pull yourself out of. People don't understand. So those with depression have to try to fight it alone... it's not right.

Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking, you can see a counsellor who will be able to talk through your emotions and how did the depression kicked in itself. The counsellor will be able to establish the key areas of how depression started and walk you through it by therapeutic work which can be a way of talking through your problems.

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Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

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Guest KG

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

No offence, but you have very little insight and empathy. I feel sorry for anyone who reads your post and doesn't feel able to 'snap out of it' because its just not that simple. Benti, to those out there that do feel emotionally low, there are people out there that want to help you to help yourself (and not for the selfish reasons the poster above claims).

Isnt if funny how you speak of vampire parasites yet you're doing a masters aren't you?

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No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

this is probably the worst post ive seen on this whole forum

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Clearly WSL has no clue what he is talking about, but he seems to think that he is an expert on the matter. Did that come off as a shock? It shouldn't have as the post is very much in line with how he normally posts.

Come to think of it, such behaviour runs rampant in our culture. I am talking about a high level of ego seen in Punjabi people who have higher level of education. I have lost count of how many times I have seen this with my very own eyes. I do always say, 'parai naal akal ni aundi'.

Edited by HDSH
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No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

Dude, your posts used to be rude, but now they are getting to a point of being insensitive and in some cases even hurtful towards those who seem to be in pain. And I agree with HDSH, its not one single bit surprising.

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Waheguru Jee Ka Khalsa Waheguru Jee Kee Fateh

West London Singh

We took you off Quality Control with the hope that the quality and level of your posts will improve. We do not want to put you under Quality Control yet again, hence consider this as a reminder to watch your tone when typing. To make it easy, put yourself in the place of the person who you're responding to and then write what your heart tells you to. You're known to put people down when responding to their posts. This will not be tolerated at Sikhsangat.com. Consider this your last warning.

Sikhsangat ADMIN team

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