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Depression And Suicide

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Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.

We all go through spells of feeling down, but when you're depressed, you feel persistently sad for weeks or months rather than just a few days.

Some people still think that depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They're wrong. Depression is a real illness with real symptoms, and it's not a sign of weakness or something you can 'snap out of' by 'pulling yourself together'.

The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery from depression.

It's important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

Depression can also strike children. Studies have shown that about 4% of children aged 5-16 in the UK are affected by depression.

Treatment for depression involves either medication or talking treatments, or usually a combination of the two. The kind of treatment that your doctor recommends will be based on the type of depression you have.

A suicidal person may not ask for help, but that doesn't mean that help isn't wanted. Most people who commit suicide don't want to die—they just want to stop hurting. Suicide prevention starts with recognizing the warning signs and taking them seriously.

If you think a friend or family member is considering suicide, you might be afraid to bring up the subject. But talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life. Speak up if you're concerned and seek professional help immediately! Through understanding, reassurance, and support, you can help your loved one overcome thoughts of suicide.

If you believe that a friend or family member is suicidal, you can play a role in suicide prevention by pointing out the alternatives, showing that you care, and getting a doctor or psychologist involved.

Take any suicidal talk or behavior seriously. It's not just a warning sign that the person is thinking about suicide — it's a cry for help.

If a friend or family member is suicidal, the best way to help is by offering an empathetic, listening ear. Let your loved one know that he or she is not alone and that you care. Don't take responsibility, however, for making your loved one well. You can offer support, but you can't get better for a suicidal person. He or she has to make a personal commitment to recovery.

It takes a lot of courage to help someone who is suicidal. Witnessing a loved one dealing with thoughts about ending his or her own life can stir up many difficult emotions. As you're helping a suicidal person, don't forget to take care of yourself. Find someone that you trust. Talking is a key…

There are trained professionals out there to help you, just pick up the phone

Sikh Help Line

Sikhhelpline.com

0845 646 0704

KaurNect

Kaurageous.com/kaurnect

07783 833364

Kaurnect@kaurageous.com

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Excellent seva Raj Ji. Your help will be a valuable resource to many.

Benti to Admin. could this post be pinned in the Gupt section so that it serves as a permanent reminder to everyone , even non registered members?

Thank you.

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Good information in this topic, I have pinned it and moved it to gupt as well left a link in the original general section.

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On behalf of someone else I have been asked to ask if kaurnect still operates as a singhnee tried to get intouch about 6weeks ago but no reply.

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Fateh,

Just out of curiosity and perhaps to alleviate the concerns of potential callers, but can you expand on the credentials of the 'trained professionals'?

Thanks and the concept of a helpline is a good one.

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On behalf of someone else I have been asked to ask if kaurnect still operates as a singhnee tried to get intouch about 6weeks ago but no reply.

yes kaurnect still operates and can be contacted through the details above.

or email info@kaurageous.com if this person is still having issue and is trying to speak to kaurnect

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It's important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

Depression can also strike children. Studies have shown that about 4% of children aged 5-16 in the UK are affected by depression.

Treatment for depression involves either medication or talking treatments, or usually a combination of the two. The kind of treatment that your doctor recommends will be based on the type of depression you have.

I commend this thread, especially given the recent tragic events. However one issue I do feel uneasy about is the issue of depression and children. Let me start by saying I ain't no doctor, so my opinions are merely personal opinions and fears. I feel it is a very dangerous and negative step to go to the doctor with complaints about your child's 'depression'. I have 2 reasons for feeling this way : Firstly, because it will stigmatize your child for the rest of his / her life. Secondly, and most importantly, you have to understand the corrupt nature of the way that medicines (drugs) and drug regulation works in our western societies. With the harmonization of drug regulation in western countries.....the drug regulators (such as the American FDA and the British MHRA) work as commercial enterprises rather than protectors of public health. After so many of the fatal drug scandals have involved medication given to children to treat things such as depression, the House of Commons Select Committee looked into the practices of the British drug regulator. What it found is that the drug companies deliberately don't make drugs to treat deadly diseases. Instead, they first of all 'market' problems that didn't previously exist. Everyone, from research labs, doctors, and medical journals are on their payroll. First they pay 'experts' to invent a problem. Once an 'expert' says there is a problem, society has no reason to doubt it. Then they pay doctors to champion their 'cures' for the 'problem'. Harmonization has mean't that the very strict drug testing of yesteryear is a thing of the past. These days, with the different national drug regulators each trying to get the business of being able to licence the drug, and thus make money, it is a process of self-regulation by the drug companies. They make the rules and they enforce the rules. My advice ? Never take a child to the doctor saying he is suffering from depression. It may just be a short-term mood problem. But once you step inside that doctors office, that child will not only be stigmatized for the rest of his life but he will be pumped with unesseccary, dangerous mind-altering drugs for the rest of his life.

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To the poster who offered his opinions about his view of the medical world, do you know how peole become stigmatized? It's often and most significantly in Asian communities due to the negative perceptions of mental illness by their OWN COMMUNITIES. So we are responsible for this not the medical world..and that is where we need to start. Secondly, I work in the profession and unfortunately it is views like yours that stop people from getting help when they need it. That's not to say the issues regarding the business around the drug business does not occur, I think you'be just over inflated this idea a million fold. It definitely occurs a lot more in America that's for sure. Also you need to think outside of medical doctors as there are a plethora of other professionals involved in the process who are less medicalised and more person centred but that is if you go to your GP and are honest about the probelms you are experiencing, which is another difficulty are people have. We are in control, if we want to be and we just need to assert this when we go to see our GP. Overall, its easy to make sweeping generalizations about the medical system further increasing the barriers in accessing the help required and making that first step.

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To the poster who offered his opinions about his view of the medical world, do you know how peole become stigmatized? It's often and most significantly in Asian communities due to the negative perceptions of mental illness by their OWN COMMUNITIES. So we are responsible for this not the medical world..and that is where we need to start. Secondly, I work in the profession and unfortunately it is views like yours that stop people from getting help when they need it. That's not to say the issues regarding the business around the drug business does not occur, I think you'be just over inflated this idea a million fold. It definitely occurs a lot more in America that's for sure. Also you need to think outside of medical doctors as there are a plethora of other professionals involved in the process who are less medicalised and more person centred but that is if you go to your GP and are honest about the probelms you are experiencing, which is another difficulty are people have. We are in control, if we want to be and we just need to assert this when we go to see our GP. Overall, its easy to make sweeping generalizations about the medical system further increasing the barriers in accessing the help required and making that first step.

Let me start of by saying it is very scary that people that 'work in the medical profession' lack basic reading and comprehension skills. Unless you sort that problem out you're liable to fatally injure one of your patients. Now.....if you read back at what I said, I stated quite clearly that my concern was with the stigmatization of 'CHILDREN'. When standards were higher in the 'medical profession', workers in that profession would have had no difficulty in reading between the lines and understanding that the 'stigma' in discussion related to English laws about things permanently staying on one's medical record and the right of every potential employer to request and view those records.

As for the issue of drugs.......one wouldn't expect you to criticise your own. After all, why would you bite the hand that feeds you ? However, you need to understand that the days when the layman had to accept everything the medical profession told him without question are over. People are far more clued up these days. The subject of 'Regulation' has slowly become a core unit of study in Universities up and down the land, and the corrupt workings of the MHRA and its lackey GP's are being exposed. Not by me.........Everything I said in the post that made you angry was just a repitition of what is being said by the Commons Health Select Committee and the distinguished professor at Cambridge ; John Abraham. Are you gonna write to them and call them unpadh pendus too ?

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Fateh,

Just out of curiosity and perhaps to alleviate the concerns of potential callers, but can you expand on the credentials of the 'trained professionals'?

Thanks and the concept of a helpline is a good one.

Kaurnect Sewadaars are trained in areas such as Domestic Violence, Sexual Violence, Sexual Exploitation, Refuge support,pharmacy workers, we have trained counsellors. There are sewadaars that have been affected by domestic violence and sexual violence who are helping other women to support them with what they are going through, along the broad of sewadaars, some are qualified in social work, psychology and criminology. We have sewdaars that are currently in the field of domestic violence and sexual violence in their professional fields helping and supporting Kaurnect.

I hope this helps... thank you

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Let me start of by saying it is very scary that people that 'work in the medical profession' lack basic reading and comprehension skills. Unless you sort that problem out you're liable to fatally injure one of your patients. Now.....if you read back at what I said, I stated quite clearly that my concern was with the stigmatization of 'CHILDREN'. When standards were higher in the 'medical profession', workers in that profession would have had no difficulty in reading between the lines and understanding that the 'stigma' in discussion related to English laws about things permanently staying on one's medical record and the right of every potential employer to request and view those records.

As for the issue of drugs.......one wouldn't expect you to criticise your own. After all, why would you bite the hand that feeds you ? However, you need to understand that the days when the layman had to accept everything the medical profession told him without question are over. People are far more clued up these days. The subject of 'Regulation' has slowly become a core unit of study in Universities up and down the land, and the corrupt workings of the MHRA and its lackey GP's are being exposed. Not by me.........Everything I said in the post that made you angry was just a repitition of what is being said by the Commons Health Select Committee and the distinguished professor at Cambridge ; John Abraham. Are you gonna write to them and call them unpadh pendus too ?

I don't really want to go off topic, yet I need to acknowledge that I 'may fatally injure one of my patients'...oh right, thanks for that Doc. Appreciate the help there.

Regarding your point about children, I just need to clarify these children do they have parents or do they take themselves along to the GP? Also having worked in CAMHS I know thats not how medicine is practiced, and all health professionals do their utmost to ensure that if a diagnosis is needed is it made with the greatest of care, with the inclusion of different reports, school observations, family etc. I personally know several adults who as children had been diagnosed and were even admitted as inpatients and still managed to succeed quite fruitfully in their lives.

I am a Sikh first and foremost, so please do not assume about me 'not criticising my own'. I question my motives and action and think holistically about my work, never would I practice as the peril of my patients. I beg everyone to question everything, no way is a doctor to 'knower of all things', the more you question the better off you will be. I'm not angry so again please resist from your assumptions, rather I want you to reflect on what you say before you write it. I am not a fan of GPs and actually new laws on GP consortia would actually be to my detriment. Also, please open your eyes, the government is THEORETICALLY all about giving the patient a voice but REALISTICALLY we need to do this ourselves.

Unpadh pindu, you don't think too highly of yourself do you?

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Good thread. I'm a Singhni who's always been able to pull herself out of down states in the face adverse situations... but for the last few weeks I have been suffering from clinical depression for the first time in my life. It is entirely different to anything I've experienced.

A mental change means that I can't "pull myself out" of sadness, and logical reasoning won't make any difference to my down state. I'm not suicidal, but I can see how my thinking has changed and my mind has taken to a rather negative disposition. Now I'll be going to my GP to get advice, probably on how to raise the serotonin levels in my brain.

Maybe interestingly, I've not told anyone about this problem. I know there's a stigma attached to depression and people seem to belittle it, thinking it to be no more than a sad state that you can pull yourself out of. People don't understand. So those with depression have to try to fight it alone... it's not right.

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Kaur-nect is a free specialist telephone support service, dedicated to helping Sikh females of all ages suffering various forms of mental and physical abuse. Help is available via one-to-one mentoring, offering individualised advice support and guidance, to support victims overcome a spectrum of challenges and hardships facing them in their lives. Forms of abuse can range from domestic physical and sexual abuse to peer pressure and bullying; what sets Kaur-nect apart from other female support services is the ethos of Gurmat which underpins its fostering approach to help victims overcome their difficulties. The helpline is manned by a pool of professional Sikh (female) volunteers, who offer their time to build and nurture confidence and capacity within victims, in accordance with the principles of Sikhi, to assist them in making life-informed decisions. The service is completely confidential to all callers, irrespective of age and personal status.

Contact us on facebook/Twitter or email us on kaurnect@kaurageous.com, OR telephone call us on our helpline 07783833364 and one of the sewdaars will contact you asap Just please give us at least 24hours notice...

Thank you

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Good thread. I'm a Singhni who's always been able to pull herself out of down states in the face adverse situations... but for the last few weeks I have been suffering from clinical depression for the first time in my life. It is entirely different to anything I've experienced.

A mental change means that I can't "pull myself out" of sadness, and logical reasoning won't make any difference to my down state. I'm not suicidal, but I can see how my thinking has changed and my mind has taken to a rather negative disposition. Now I'll be going to my GP to get advice, probably on how to raise the serotonin levels in my brain.

Maybe interestingly, I've not told anyone about this problem. I know there's a stigma attached to depression and people seem to belittle it, thinking it to be no more than a sad state that you can pull yourself out of. People don't understand. So those with depression have to try to fight it alone... it's not right.

Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking, you can see a counsellor who will be able to talk through your emotions and how did the depression kicked in itself. The counsellor will be able to establish the key areas of how depression started and walk you through it by therapeutic work which can be a way of talking through your problems.

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Depression can be dealt with in two ways, medication and talking

No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

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No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

No offence, but you have very little insight and empathy. I feel sorry for anyone who reads your post and doesn't feel able to 'snap out of it' because its just not that simple. Benti, to those out there that do feel emotionally low, there are people out there that want to help you to help yourself (and not for the selfish reasons the poster above claims).

Isnt if funny how you speak of vampire parasites yet you're doing a masters aren't you?

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No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

this is probably the worst post ive seen on this whole forum

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Clearly WSL has no clue what he is talking about, but he seems to think that he is an expert on the matter. Did that come off as a shock? It shouldn't have as the post is very much in line with how he normally posts.

Come to think of it, such behaviour runs rampant in our culture. I am talking about a high level of ego seen in Punjabi people who have higher level of education. I have lost count of how many times I have seen this with my very own eyes. I do always say, 'parai naal akal ni aundi'.

Edited by HDSH
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No. Depression can be dealt with by many other means also, E.g :

1) Naam Simran

2) Exercise

3) Hard work

4) Social life ....e.g regularly going to gurdwara, mixing with your fellow sikhs in the langar hall, socialising with your fellow sikhs by preparing langar, seva etc

OP, at the end of day, there is actually great wisdom in the words "snap out of it". Like everything else in life, depression becomes a habit. It becomes a habit to always see the glass as half empty. To change the habit the hard bit is taking the first steps to doing the things in the above list. A depressed person will always put off doing those things. Once he or she takes those first steps however, positive thinking can become a habit.

What the depressed person needs to realise is that there are many many people out there who make a living on people being 'depressed', and many others that depend on it in order to be able to put good things on their c.v (voluntary work). Drug companies with their drugs......doctors with their pay per patient.....professional counsellors with their fees, do-gooders looking to put something good on their resume etc etc. It doesn't serve any of their's self-interest to tell you that you don't need any of them and the solution is in your own hands. They are vampire parasites that feed on your 'illness'. I say to thee, therefore, just snap out of it !

Dude, your posts used to be rude, but now they are getting to a point of being insensitive and in some cases even hurtful towards those who seem to be in pain. And I agree with HDSH, its not one single bit surprising.

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Waheguru Jee Ka Khalsa Waheguru Jee Kee Fateh

West London Singh

We took you off Quality Control with the hope that the quality and level of your posts will improve. We do not want to put you under Quality Control yet again, hence consider this as a reminder to watch your tone when typing. To make it easy, put yourself in the place of the person who you're responding to and then write what your heart tells you to. You're known to put people down when responding to their posts. This will not be tolerated at Sikhsangat.com. Consider this your last warning.

Sikhsangat ADMIN team

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