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Found 235 results

  1. Vaisakh: Sikhi vs Punjabism

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! A Basic Rundown of Vaisakhi Vaisakhi is a dharmic, and cultural festival which is celebrated on the 13th or 14th of April every year. For Sikhs, it commemorates the formation of Khalsa Panth, for Punjabi's it marks the beginning of the harvest season. The celebration of Vaisakhi predates Sikhi itself, however after the formalization of the Khalsa in 1699 it was mainly celebrated as a religious event for Sikhs. A lot of people might not realize this, but Guru Nanak Dev Ji was also born on Vaisakhi 1469 (Wikipedia is wrong), the same day Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the 10th Human form of Nanak, decided to lay down the formalization for the Khalsa Panth. This fact is often forgotten, but it amplifies the importance of Vaisakhi for Sikhs, as not just a celebration for the creation of the Khalsa, but also the day Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born. The Truth about Vaisakhi Vaisakhi used to be a Punjabi new years harvest festival, and was transformed by Guru Gobind Singh Ji to celebrate the creation of the Khalsa, but modern day Vaisakhi has mostly devolved from a celebration of the Khalsa back into a Punjabi festival. Vaisakhi for Sikhs isnt about Bhangra dancing, colorful cloths, or free food, it's about celebrating the creation of the Khalsa Panth. When I ask non-sikhs, and even some sikhs about Vaisakhi, they seem to be clueless as to why we celebrate it in the first place, and instead make it about free food or socializing with friends. We attend all these Nagar Kirtan parades and we eat food and meet friends, but at the end of the day we dont end up learning anything about Sikhi. Sadly, Vaisakhi also gets hijacked by corporations trying to promote their business, and Politicians trying to promote their party. This is bad becuase their are taking advantage of such an important occasion, however isn't that bad becuase these corporations and politicians also contribute a lot of funds to organizing Vaisakhi, help spread awareness, and participate in it themselves to attract even more people. I think we should find a way to limit them, if not cut them out completely. We are not responsible for promoting another culture at a Sikh event, especially when they are using Gurdwara money, on Gurdwara property, under the name of a Sikh event. Punjabi culture itself is often times anti Sikh as it promotes alcohol, sexism, caste system, etc. If we allow any of it, then we risk mixing it and passing it off as Sikhi to the rest of the world. This will create a lot of problems becuase people will be fed misinformation that will be the direct result of Sikhi being watered down by Punjabi culture. Now before you get triggered and start calling me a radical, fundamentalist, zealot, extremist or any of the buzzwords people like to use, just keep in mind that I am a freedom of speech and expression advocate, and I dont feel like we should outright ban Bhangra, Punjabi Music, or food. I definitely feel like their are a lot of people who come to Vaisakhi just for the food, music, dancing, etc, and to ban the aforementioned practices would cut off a lot of people who could be potentially educated on Sikhi. Instead of having a complete blanket Ban like some Sikhs propose, I think that we should try to somehow limit the Punjabi culture and push back hard and find a way to bring the focus on Vaisakhi back to Sikhi instead of Punjabi culture. Typical Punjabi "Counterarguments" When I bring up the issue of the Punjabiization of Vaisakhi, I often times hear the same pathetic counterarguments from Punjabis who try to defend the Punjabification of Vaisakhi. I will now address some of these common "counterarguments" that Punjabis bring up in defense of the current state of Vaisakhi. One common argument Punjabis like to bring up is "oh but most people who attend Vaisakhi are already Sikh, why do you have to promote relgion so much?", that might be true, but keep in mind that most people are only Sikh in name, and when confronted, they know very little about Sikhi, or just know misinformation. When I personally do parchaar and hand out the "3 Facts about Sikhi" leaflets at Vaisakhi, a lot of Punjabi "Sikhs" reject my lefts saying something along the lines of "were already Sikh,we know about Sikh-ism, just focus on the white people, not us", however when I ask them to explain the basic principles they fail miserably and then finally bend the knee and accept the leaflet. Another common argument is "oh but Vaisakhi existed before Sikhi, and was celebrated by farmers as a new year's/harvest festival, you can't just hijack it", it's true that Vaisakhi and was celebrated as a new year's/harvest festival prior to Sikhi, however Sikhs celebrate it becuase of the creation of the Khalsa, and that is what really popularized Vaisakhi, and is what it's known for today. How many people, especially Sikhs in the west, honestly celebrate Vaisakhi as a harvest festival? Most of us aren't even farmers, without Sikhi, Vaisakhi would be all but irrelevant in the modern age. If someone wants to celebrate Vaisakhi as a harvest festival, then they are free to do so and we aren't stopping them, however we as Sikhs must remember that we celebrate Vaisakhi as the creation of the Khalsa. Make Vaisakhi Great Again At the moment Vaisakhi is nothing more than a Punjabi festival with a Sikhi twist, we need to reverse that. I propose that we start by increasing all efforts to do parchar and educate the community on Sikhi. Vaisakhi attracts hundreds of thousands of people, all of whom have the potential to be educated. This is a golden opportunity that only comes once a year, and we as a Panth need to capitalize on it if we are to grow Sikhi. What better place and time to spread Sikhi than at a Nagar Kirtan during Vaisakhi time. It honestly says a lot about the Sikh community when very few "Sikhs" are educated on it, and even fewer are fully committed to the faith. I feel like we need to really focus on our community, and not sideline them in favor of non-sikhs, becuase at the end of the day these are the people who identify as Sikh and still practice some form of Sikhi, even tho it is a watered down, and heavily Punjabiized version. Punjabi culture is like a double edged sword, it promotes anti-sikh practices, however it also promotes pride & bravery to defend ones way of life. When things get serious, Punjabi's are often the first one to go fight on the frontlines. During 1984 many non Amritdhari Punjabis, who were otherwise never religious and would never wake up for Amritvela, joined the fight and died fighting in defense of Harmandir Sahib. The thing about Punjabi's is that they are always ready to die for the Panth, but aren't willing to live for the Panth. I feel like Punjabis have a place in the Sikh community becuase without them we wouldn't get very far. We need to take the good things about Punjabi culture and leave the bad, this is why I dont feel like Punjabis are a lost cause and are worth doing Parchaar to. What I propose is that we drastically increase our education efforts. This can be done in the form of educational events, school programs, university courses, and most importantly: street parchaar. We must also compare and contrast between Sikhi and Punjabism in order to separate them, and demonstrate Sikhi's obvious superiority. Instead of a straight up ban, I would suggest we specifically stop Music that contains anti Sikh themes that promote drugs, alcohol, degrading women, etc at Sikh associated events and Gurdwaras. If someone wants to go around blasting anti Sikh music then by all means go ahead, but not at a Sikh event. As for bhangra, although it does not represent Sikhi, if someone wants to dance to celebrate the creation of the Khalsa then I think it's fine. If we follow through with the aforementioned strategies, we can still keep the Punjabis happy, all while promoting Sikhi! My Question for the Community What would you improve or change for Vaisakhi to make it focus more on sikhi, rather than Punjabi culture? Please leave your suggestions down below. Resources Informative Leaflets RajoanaTV Exposing the Culturalization of Vaisakhi Nanak Naam on why Sikhs celebrate Vaisakhi, & its significance Basics of Sikhi on The Unique Khalsa Panth! Vaisakhi Katha
  2. sikh morality code

    Hi. So I had this idea of putting together a 'morality code', initially for youth, but also for older sikhs we want to connect more with the religion and also for non-sikhs interested to learn. I want all the rules to be based on teachings of SGGS. Sort a basic moral guidance based in Gurbani. I invite you all to suggest alterations and additions. It would be good to have Gurbani quotes to go with the list, but I'm have not memorised SGGS well enough, so if anyone can help with that too, that would be good. Moral 'guides' for sikhs: 1. Always remember God/Gods name. This is a must. You can do this while living your day to day life. As per Gurbani, to do Naam Simran is to live, and to forget it is to die. The definition of maya is whatever makes you forget God. God and His Name are the same. You remember one, you remember the other. You can (and should) remember Him in a natural and unstrained manner. Remembering Him also means remembering He is nearby. The gradual aim is to remember Him with each breath and morsel of food and drink. 2. Always remember God's Will. What is Gods Will? It is the supreme power, by which everything happens. As per Gurbani, the definition of blindness is forgetting God's will. 3. Be an honest person. This means- don't tell lies, don't deceive people. Its doesn't that you have to walk down the road with a megaphone, announcing your deepest darkest secrets. But it means that you should not deceive people. Be one person, inside and out. Don't lead 'double lives'. If you are an adult, earn money honestly (not by cheating or slacking off your job). 4. Don't have any hatred. Instead of hatred, seek wisdom. 5. Don't have any fear, and don't put fear into anyone. Have faith in God instead. Not having fear does not mean getting into fights or climbing tall buildings or playing stupid 'dare' games- these things are actually the signs of fearful people battling repressed fears. 6. Don't slander or gossip about anyone. Avoid anyone who does. Do not mind if anyone slanders you, just see it as a cleansing exercise (gives you humility). 7. Avoid bad company. Remember that someone may seem religious externally, but may have bad characteristics. don't judge people by external appearances. 8. Avoid the five thieves/ demons- lust, anger, pride, enchantment (mohe) and greed. Recognise them for what they are- demons (that posses and drive people to do evil things they wouldn't otherwise do) and thieves (that steal people's wisdom, self-control and intelligence). 9. Show kindness (dayal) and forgiveness. 10. Believe that God exists and trust Him. 11. Follow Gurbani instead of precepts of mind (manmukhi). 12. Get up early. Keep God hygiene. Practise Naam Simran in a seated position, with concentration in the morning. 13. Show respect to your parents and your elders. Don't criticise them for their flaws. Don't deceive them, speak rudely to them. Show them consideration. Treat all elderly people like they are your grandparents. 14. Speak softly, and avoid bad language. Guru ji says talking filth is like putting filth into your mouth. Speak only truth, but do so in a kind manner. Know when it is better to keep quiet. 15. Have good hygiene, show respect for the body God has given you. Have a neat appearance. Keep a good posture. 16. Do all your work honestly, and work hard. 17. Remember the poor and needy and do something for them. E.g. give to the homeless. Give dasvand if you are earning money.
  3. Feel like leaving it all

    I am in my 30s, have a career that is just starting to take off and quite ambitious. It is stressful but I have a good support system. Yet I feel like leaving it all and just meditating. I've noticed whenever i do start my meditation I become a little sad. As though this isn't my home. I start seeing the futility of it all. I stop engaging with the world. My needs and wants are very less, if it weren't for family and the poor that I want to help I would be happy working at someplace like tescos. I need advise on how to deal with this detachment.
  4. The fate of empires

    I've been studying civilizations recently and I came across this essay by Sir Glubb. He essentially states the life cycle of the majority of world empires. To summarize, there are 6 ages. The Age of Pioneers (outburst) The Age of Conquests The Age of Commerce The Age of Affluence The Age of Intellect The Age of Decadence. The final age is marked with defensivness, pessimism, frivolity, materialism, immigration, weakening of religion, duty and responsibility, and the welfare. Looking at most of the west today, it seems we are well into decadence and since most empires have about 250 years, we can expect lots of changes in the coming decades. I was wondering what the rest of the panth has to say about this, and what can we do to potentially become the new pioneers when the west collapses. Also, if we took control how could we use gurmatt to keep the raj from declining. Here is a link the the file, it's an interesting read: glubb.pdf
  5. Can we really take hukamnamas from this website? Please clarify if we can or not.
  6. Why is it that we have been placed in this cycle first of all? Was there a fall from grace similar to the Abrahamic religions? I'm curious to know if this is addressed within Sikhi?
  7. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! Often times when I or many other Sikhs are debating people of other faiths, I allways hear some Sikhs bring up the line: ਬੇਦ ਕਤੇਬ ਕਹਹੁ ਮਤ ਝੂਠੇ ਝੂਠਾ ਜੋ ਨ ਬਿਚਾਰੈ ॥ - Siri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Ang 1350 Which is translated to mean: "Do not say that the Vedas, the Bible and the Koran are false. Those who do not contemplate them are false." Link to full shabad: https://www.searchgurbani.com/guru-granth-sahib/ang-by-ang I have asked many people about the true meaning behind this tuk, and most people would agree that its correctly translated, however there are some who would disagree, and translate it in a way that is directly the opposite of what the English translation means. Let me give you an example: Literal meaning breakdown ਬੇਦ = Literally meaning "Ved" referring to the Vedas from Sanatana Dharma (often called "Hinduism") ਕਤੇਬ = Literally meaning "books", however in the context of Bhagat Kabeer it means the three major abrehamic books: bible, quran, torah. ਕਹਹੁ = Literally meaning "Say" ਮਤ = Now this is the part that is often disputed. How one interprets this one word can change the entire shabads meaning, and even affect Sikhi as a whole. Often times people will say "mat" means "do not", however the same word is also used with different meanings. An example is the word "Gurmat", this word doesn't mean "Guru Dont". ਝੂਠੇ = Literally meaning "false" or "untrue" Differences in Opinion The AKJ founder Randhir Singh translated this tuk to mean that Bhagat Kabeer (who is technically not a Muslim but a Sikh as per Gurbani) is saying that this tuk is saying that the ved and abrehamic books are false, however most of the English translations that Sikhs read, seem to suggest the exact opposite. I am personalty not AKJ or any other jatha, and I disagree with some stuff Bhai Randir Singh says, however on this specific issue, I lean towards "ਮਤ" not meaning "do not" in this context. The reason for this is becuase if you take the entire shabad, as well as the life of Bhagat Kabeer, its obvious that hes criticizing Islamic practices, and fundamental ideas of the abrehamic regions, and the eastern dharmas under the blanket of Sanatana Dharma. People often bring up the counter argument that "all relgions/dharmas have some truth in them", and this is generally true, and varies on specific relgion or dharma, however in general, the reason Sikhi needed to be revitalized in the 4th age (Kal Yug "the dark age") was becuase all other religions and dharms had failed (as stated in Dasam Granth which is generally believed to be written by the Guru in his 10th temporal form). Bani also criticizes the vedas on other shabads, correct me if im wrong, but at one point it literally says that its make belief, so then why would the Guru contradict itself? Here is an example of a counterargument against the English translation of "Do not say that the Vedas, the Bible and the Koran are false. Those who do not contemplate them are false." Link to counterargument: http://www.searchsikhism.com/islam-in-gurbani My questions for Sikh who are educated in Gurbani: What do you guys think of this? Do you think the English translation of Gurbani was deliberately changed to not offend others? If so, what is the correct way to interpret this tuk?
  8. Last time i checked only hindus don't eat beef, there's no bani that specifically says beef is not allowed. I did hear there was some lines in Aggardanti bani where Guru Gobind Singh Ji speaks about cow slaughter, but i've been told the context is different.
  9. There are repeated posts on this forum that I frequently highlight, predominantly by jagsaw and jkv, although there are others, that effectively are blatant incorrect lies and factually incorrect. They are written in a manner to spread false information and stir up emotional responses to show that Sikhs are being hard done by. Whilst this may be the case in some situations, the damage that you're doing to the kaum is immeasurable as you are showing Sikhs to be idiotic bullshi••ers, in a similar way to the way that the Sunday sport reported "news". The last people to do that successfully with deliberately incorrect propaganda were the nazis...... But regardless of that, SGGS JI is explicit about a sikh not lying. There are many things written about chootth. But to do it in the name of sikhi is besharaami at its finest. I see it as no better than having a steak whilst doing paath or smoking a spliff in the gurdwara. A total disgrace. Wjkk wjkf
  10. One line from Sukhmani sahib answers this question. ਪ੍ਰਭ ਕੈ ਸਿਮਰਨਿ ਗਰਭਿ ਨ ਬਸੈ ॥ Remembering God, one does not reside in the womb. Ang 262 There are some Sikhs who don't believe the soul travels through any other life. However the above line from Sukhmani sahib is telling us if a person does simran of Akal Purakh they won't come in the womb again. The word "again" is being added in the interpretation because we came into this world through the mother's womb as a human already. Now Sukhmani sahib is saying to prevent from coming again we need to do his simran (remember Akal Purakh). Some Sikhs will play with the word ਗਰਭਿ (which means womb) and say we won't reside in the world if we do his simran. Such an analogy does not work because we reside in the world whether we do his simran or not. A jivan mukht person reside on earth till its time to leave the world. Similarly replacing the word womb with mind. The person resides in the mind by thought whether we do his simran or not. A jivan mukht person resides in the mind to fulfill the worldly duties as was shown by Bhagat Dhanna Jatt ji who asked for a good wife and cow after being jivan mukht. The analogies don't work and this bothers some Sikhs very much. They are stuck with their belief system. Sukhmani sahib says remember him and the mind will be soothed to accept what Gurbani says. Gurbani tells us what to do and also gives us facts on how Vaheguru runs his creation.
  11. WJKK WJKF, I have been wanting to marry a girl who belongs to another caste. We've been together for a few years now and have been trying to move our relationship forward. My parents have been adament on not letting this happen whereas her parents are ready to move forward since the day my partner convinced them to overlook my caste. Despite me trying to explain to my parents that she is what I would want as my life partner and what our house would need as a daughter in law (ie. family-centric, caring, vegetarian, wants to progress in Sikhi with me, and etc.), caste is the only thing they see. My parents have even said said to let her go and find someone in my caste and they'll be happy (which is funny because there are not that many people of my "caste" around me anyways so regardless, it would have been be impossible for me to even find anyone unless they'd want me to marry my cousins or distant cousins lol). Ideally they want to arrange my marriage. I have explained so much that these caste differentials are not important anymore now and should've never been. And that Gurbani itself condemns this many times. I guess I can't bring Gurbani more into this as I would be a hypocrite since I am still struggling in some aspects of Sikhi and gradually working towards a Gurmat mindset. But anyways, they don't want to listen. They are worried more about what will relatives think and that our so called "enemies" will laugh at our family. And they keep saying they had so many "reeja" for my marriage (I think this would translate to expectations of getting me married in their idealistic way). I feel like the underlying issue is that they don't want to "lose" their son as they feel like they won't have as much "control", for lack of a better word, if my wife turns out to be a total nutshell and destroys the family or something lol. I tried to console them on this matter as my partner isn't that way and wants to live within my family in harmony. I have always been the obedient child out of choice so they won't have to deal with any extra nonsense in life from my end (until now I guess in their perspective). With Guru ji's Kirpa, I've graduated, have a well paying job, and carry my own weight. I continue to live at home and have my share of family responsibilities. I believe it's my duty. I have done nothing to show my parents that I can't make logical/well thought out decisions in life. So I'm not sure why they can't trust my decision of being with my partner. My partner wants to live the same lifestyle with my family as that is what she was looking for as well. I can't think of being with anybody else. The over-infatuation or honeymoon phase is long gone and we want to convert our relationship into a life of living responsibly with Sikh values and subtracting the negative Punjabi cultural values (flashing wealth, caste discrimination, gender discrimination, alcoholism, God-men Dera worship, chuggli nindya, you name it). How can I convince my parents? It has been taking me so long trying to convince them and has taken a toll on my mental health. I don't want to elope and run away from home as that would not be Gurmat. It would tear me apart and be unfair to her family as they have been understanding and are basically on standby until my family is on board. Has anybody else been in a similar situation? Any suggestions would be much appreciated!
  12. For some sikhi is not dependant on kesh , however the truth is Guru Nanak has done parchaar on this subject , a few reminders
  13. Gurfateh ji, I am in my early 20's and don't get along with my grandma. she really knows how to get under my skin. She's not even like an evil grandma or anything. Just a normal everyday bibi. She is always lingering, nagging to do housework. She's super negative towards my dad and muttering under her breathe. On top of that she is amritdhari without any understanding of gurmat which really annoys me. Wears kakkar but will never teach me punjabi or sit down have gurmat vichaar or want to change mentality. Yet she will end every conversation with "Challo, Vaheguru de hatha vich ee aa" reluctantly after 1 hr of being unsatisfied about her life. I feel guilty for wanting to do things my own way; hermit zone, listen to kirtan and katha and do chores separate (I concentrate better + chores done quicker). I don't want to talk to bibi as I find most content unnecessary. Her whole life is about housework and revolves around that so I be formal and respectful but that's it. I have to force myself to talk for her mental wellbeing so she doesn't feel alone. Then I feel drained personally, feeling spiritually empty/ disconnected cos havn't had enough katha/ kirtan/ vichaar/ sangat to remind of real purpose. Even if we don't talk, it's like she is always sending negativity towards me. (?Idk if going crazy). If someone is an elder I don't automatically respect them. If they have gian, gurmat, positivity then I do truely love and respect them, regardless if blood relationship or not. But if all that has been collected in negativity, hypocrisy then I have no need/ desire to respect bcos i seek more than that. I also lowkey resent that she never passed on knowledge e.g. about punjabi, meanings of gurbani cos she doesn't know. It's just about mundane things like making sabji... which sorry bibi, I know it's your life purpose but for me I know and can make it and that's it. I don't need to talk about daal sabji, housework etc to fill out my day. And then this contaminates my own sikhi cos look at me now... I am unsatisfied and complaining about another human being. It's taking away from my life, where this energy should be focused on Vaheguru. I don't want to end up like my family and put housework etc before sikhi. It's like a mix of hormones, generational differences in thinking, spiritual ego of mine, cultural guiltyness for not respecting elders, and no1 lack of experience in grist jeevan skills. Please help. Some insight to how to establish some sort of common ground? Anyone have similar experiences or am I the only rotten'' child?
  14. how deluded is Niddar Sio?

    Watched this video as it came up on my recommendations , Niddar comes across as unstable , and forcefully distorting everything to cater to RSS line that we are just another form of Hindu... of course Whitey doesn't know any better ...so what to do ?
  15. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! Here is a question i I received from a Christian who is studying Sikhi: “If waheguru is eternal and encompasses the universe (but not limited to just the universe itself) and has existed always and will always continue to exist, how did ego enter into at least part of the world? if waheguru is inside all things including humans, at what point did parts of waheguru (by parts I mean humans, animals etc) get "infected" with ego? It would stand to reason that something pure like waheguru could never succumb to ego. for example the gurus or fully realized people will never succumb to ego again, correct? so if waheguru existed eternally, how did ego enter? has ego also existed eternally with waheguru? (I don't think this is the Sikhi standpoint). Is it possible for waheguru to cease existing permanently, or for waheguru to tell lies? I would assume that it would not be, since it goes against waheguru's nature, correct? Why would waheguru create confusion/ego/illusion and cause part of itself to be deluded? How do Sikh's know then that the Gurus never made a mistake, if as you say it's possible for a fully realized person to become deluded? Based on this, is it even possible that waheguru spoke some falsehoods or lies, even in the SGGS or part of the Sikh teachings?” How would you answere this question?
  16. Reprogramming ourselves........very interesting talk by Jagraj Singh. Wish I could have met and talked to this brother. All the best for 2018, I hope it stretches us all to new levels.
  17. Sikhitothemax

    Why the hell does a website about sikhi have such a ridiculous name? "To the max"???? why not go the whole hog and call it "***********" or "sikhiindahouseniggaz" i despair with some of the downright behvkoofi in our kaum...... wjkk wjkf
  18. Say you have a young brother or sister or you have your own kids... How would you stop or guide them from converting to another religion or leaving Sikhi altogether and become atheist? In Islam and christianity the kids are brainwashed quite heavily against leaving the faith which would mean eternal hellfire for the disbeliever and only path to salvation is following that faith. Does Sikhi have anything like that in scriptures which we should be teaching our people so that they do not take lightly the thought of leaving the protection and beauty of Sikhi. I know there is verses which state without the Guru there is no salvation (of the soul) in this life...
  19. some people may think that Naam Simran is just for Sants. As per Gurbani, it is imperative for everyone. what is Naam Simran? For those who do not know or understand Gurbani or Panjabi, it means to lovingly remember God's Name. I have to admit when I first read Gurbani, I thought 'Naam', 'Name', was used metaphorically. How could so much power be ascribed to something so simple? It took me a while to convince myself that Guruji was actually taking about Naam, Name, and not being metaphorical.
  20. Hi, This has probably been discussed before but it's something I can't really wrap my head around. I'm a singh with full beard and have cousins who are the same, we are finding it difficult to find Sikh girls as life partners. The ones I've been introduced to have a problem with me not cutting my beard and being vegetarian etc... few have asked me if I would cut my beard etc... this coming from supposedly Sikh girls and it's quite disgraceful. I've had more interest from girls who are not Sikh...i.e Gujarati, English girls etc.. who don't seem to care about me being a full singh, it's raising questions in my head about the future of Sikhi as a whole, our Sikh girls are moving away from our faith/traditions and adopting western values and ways above all. One of my cousins got fed up and cut his beard in the hopes to be more 'accepted', but I feel this is the wrong choice to make. I'd be lying if I said the thought didn't cross my mind but I don't want to move away from Sikhi just to find a wife, but it seems like our Sikh girls are. Suppose this is more of a rant than a question as such.
  21. How to get Youth in to sikhi

    How should Sikh Sangat get youth more into sikhi and educate other religions because a lot of youth don't know about our rich history I was thinking of a programme or some kind of YouTube stream and put kirtan Katha and Q&As how should we educate youth such as me into gurbani and sikhi
  22. French Sikh Looking for Help!!!

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! I have a friend who is a Sikh from France, and he lives near no Gurdwara. He is looking for a sangat and someone to help him out. The problem is that he contacted the Gurdwaras in france multiple times, but they have not responded. Please help!
  23. Sikhi in South america

    Can Sikhism flourish in South America? I have heard there some Sikhs in mexico. But can we not do more. Or do our leaders only care about helping terrorist rohinga. We are not exactly a big religion in terms of numbers. What can be done in South america. Do we have the structures in place throughout the world with adequate funding? Lets looks at Islam. Thousands of mexicans have recently converted to Islam sawing the seeds for Islamic sharia and domination in South america. Yet Sikhs even though we are a wealthy community cannot do any type of missionary programe. Infact we are plaine useless when it comes to spreading our faith. Is it any wonder that Sikhs will eventually become a very tiny insignificant population and people with no political voice or power in the world. We are more concerned with silly little affairs, that we are losing the reality of the bigger picture. Our faith is under threat from extermination. Yet all we really care about is having a glassy and bhangra and making sure our turban is tied correctly. Its time Sikhs all across the world woke up and smelt the coffee before it is to late. Missionary work needs to begin in every country in every continent in every village. We need to show that we want people to join our faith. Instead of preaching that all religions are the way to God and it does not matter if you are Sikh or not. Boleeeeeeeeeeeeeee Soni ni haal Satsriakal
  24. Conversion to Sikhi ?!

    Is conversion to Sikhi welcome ? I wasn't born in India (we only go there once every three years to meet relatives) so I can't really read the Gurmukhi script or any proper punjabi script....... My parents took me to a gurudwara regularly as the closest temple was too far, and my hindi was weak so I didn't want to go there anyway. I'm aged 16 - 20 if that matters.
  25. Miri-Piri in Sikhi.

    The Sikh Theory of Dual Sovereignty. The three paramount aims of Nanakianism, ab initio, are: 1.) The reorientation of the individual from a base creature- a creature of the senses- to a spiritually attuned and intuitive being. 2.) The consecutive reorientation, and arraignment, of societal atrophy vis-a-vis equality and universalism. 3.) The establishment of a corporate base from whence the downtrodden and oppressed can be made to realize their status as founts of all civic authority and be steeled to resist both socio-political and politico-religious tyranny. Guru Nanak Dev Ji, the initiator of the ethos, openly decried the incumbent powers of his time who continually eschewed the fundamental rights of their subjects. A witness to both Brahminical (Caste) and Shariat (Islamic) totalitarianism, the Guru sundered his acolytes from traditional Indic spirituality which emphasized a quietist attitude towards life and mandated the spiritual seeker to retreat from societal concerns. (1) Via the Guru’s perception, both ruler and the ruled were equally culpable in the atrophy of the socio-political paradigm, ‘The emperors be insatiable beasts, their viziers be the curs. The Age is a knife, the kings be the butchers. In such darkness, the moon of morality is nowhere visible.’ (2) ‘…the subjects, blind, and devoid of knowledge divine pay bribes to satisfy their overlords’ avarice.’ (3) His was a faith which challenged the individual to offer their head, figuratively and literally, in pursuit of societal betterment and resistance in face of authoritarian oppression. (4) Rejecting the Semitic theory of man’s inherent imperfectness, in toto, the Guru bowed to his acolyte Angad and nominated him as his successor. The ideology of Nanakianism, thus, was identified as being paramount than the corporeal body. Angad who imbued it in full was transformed into Nanak II whilst his predecessor discarded his own mortal coil for the heavenly realms having laid the edifice of a Sui generis faith and nation. It was, essentially, the continuation of a revolution which in time would herald the raising of a corporate entity dedicated to challenging the might of all absolutist states and their pretensions of being the sole focal points of all dedication and loyalty. The arraignment and subsequent execution of Guru Arjan Dev Ji, Nanak V, at the hands of the theocratic Islamic Mughal state- far from altering the complexion of the Sikh faith as most modern historians contend- acted as a catalyst for Nanakianism’s rapid evolution. Acknowledging that the times were not conducive for dialogue Guru Arjan advised his successor to arm himself, and after investing himself with sovereign regalia, to raise an army and construct a seat of power. It was in the latter vein that Guru Hargobind Sahib Ji ascended the steps of the newly constructed Akal-Takhat in 1606 A.D. and, after having been coronated Guru, promulgated the principle of Miri-cum-Piri or dual sovereignty. Nanak Ihad mandated his acolytes to accept the worldly life in full and the responsibilities it entailed. Nanak VI not only renewed this mandate but explicated it in full through the concepts of Miri and Piri. This principle of dual sovereignty, fundamentally speaking, posited that the individual was the fount of all political authority and that he/she must owe their allegiance to truth and morality (5) rather than any political state. The state, as Schulse, contends cannot lay claim to absolutism and divine perfectness without forfeiting it’s right to rule as the very notion of it’s perfectness is imperfect. (6) Such a state would necessarily lay claim to the right to govern not only the bodies but also the minds of it’s subjects exclusively which is a hazardous and Orwellian notion in all respects. The unfolding of Sikh history from the 17th century onwards, then, must be analyzed in the light of the Miri-Piri doctrine in order to grasp the antagonism which the faith-cum-nation has continually displayed towards historic and post-modernist states. The salient facets of Miri-Piri, generically, stipulate that: 1.) The State is self-limited and cannot lay claim to absolute perfectness irrespective of it’s governing model. 2.) The government of any State is Primus inter paras rather than potentate as the subjects of a state are the focal points of all civic authority and not the government itself. (7) 3.) Truth and morality outweigh political prerogative(s). 4.) The State is an expression of power, it’s government the tool to exercise this power. The individual, essentially, is the fount from whence this power originates. Vis-a-vis the Khalsa, the collective body of the Sikhs, the doctrine is more explicit: 1.) The demarcation between State and Faith must be reflected in the set-up of any political entity qua the Sikhs; faith -in this case- means righteousness and when the State digresses from it the Sikhs are to initiate dialog with the powers that be or ,failing that, resort to the sword. Guru Gobind Singh Ji, Nanak X, aptly sums up this principle in his Zafarnamah: ‘When all forms of tolerance and mediation are breached, it is righteous to resort to the sword (force)…’ (8) 2.) The Sikhs, as per their own metalegal charter, must be dealt with impersonally i.e. through the aegis of impersonal law rather than arbitrary self-will. (9) 3.) The State must generically realize that it is a tool and governance is a privilege. The government is Primus inter paras and it should realize that in due course it’s perceptions will clash with those of other civil groups. It cannot lay claim to absolutism, perfectness and/or an individual’s pristine loyalty. (10) 4.) The Khalsa- corporate collective of the Sikh nation- being a body of the pristine, has been bequeathed the sovereignty of both the spiritual and temporal realms. When dealing with it, the State cannot atomize it into singular figures vis-a-vis political policy. (11) Following protracted discussions with Bahadur Shah, the fanatical Aurangzeb’s successor, Guru Gobind Singh Ji initiated the occultist Madho Dass into the Khalsa and re-named him Banda Singh Bahadur. Bahadur, now reformed from his ascetic ways, was dispatched to the Punjab as Commander-In-Chief of the Khalsa forces; his mandate, if put simply, was to avenge the atrocities committed on the Guru’s Sikhs and pave the way for Halemi-Raaj or a just State. Parleys with Bahadur Shah had been blocked by the latter himself who was unwilling to efface his predecessor’s bigoted Shariat policies leading to the realization of the Guru’s above mentioned maxim. (12) Banda Singh and the Khalsa vanguard broke the Mughals’, otherwise, tenacious grip on the Punjab through a protracted guerrilla war in which they were supported by the Punjabi peasantry. In 1710 A.D. a coalition of the Khalsa and the peasantry succeeded in annihilating the Mughal bastion of Sirhind and over-running it. Declaring the commencement of Sikh reign, as a result, the Khalsa minted coins with the herald: ‘Triumphant, the Khalsa asserts it’s sovereignty in both the worlds seen and unseen.’ (13) Weathering a century long persecution, the Sikhs stuck to their guns until they ultimately succeeded in establishing the Halemi-Raaj envisioned by their Gurus. During the darker days of their existence they were offered many respites by their persecutors. The Afghani hordes, lead by Ahmad Shah Durrani, offered them a treaty on condition of them accepting vassalage. Taking affront, the Khalsa blatantly refused and continued it’s crusade against the foreign aggressors. Ratan Singh Bhangu describes the prevailing Sikh spirit thus: ‘…the Khalsa, then, replied: “who has ever bestowed political power for the asking?” There is no meeting ground between the Turks and the Singhs…’ (14) Vassalage was never-and never will be- the Khalsa ideal; full sovereignty is the Khalsa’s aim for the implementation of Halemi-Raaj. The question which naturally emerges, here, is that how does the principle of Miri-Piri correspond with current political setups? Let us analyze the four current political state setups viz the welfare state, the communist state, the modern democratic state and the theocratic state to answer this query. The welfare state, as described by S. Kapur Singh, consists of four elements namely: 1.) Ubiquitous responsibility for providing equal opportunity to all constituents irrespective of prior/present situation(s). (15) 2.) Ubiquitous responsibility for providing equal financial security for the aged, infirm etc. 3.) Ubiquitous responsibility for implementing and collating taxes in order to reduce the margin between the “haves” and “have not’s.” 4.) Ubiquitous responsibility for utilizing all available resources. Welfare, as a political principle, however is a welfare state’s main leverage in imposing upon the individual. When one of the aforementioned elements are accepted, the others naturally follow. (16) This model of state, then, posits a quid pro quo formulation where slavery is the price of security. (17) Once this formulation is placed in the hands of the power-hungry, the subjects are logically rendered apolitical. Welfarism, as a political philosophy, is best summarized by Aristotle in his description of tyranny: ‘the humility of the subjects; the disunity of subjects, and consecutively, the inability of the subjects to unite…’ (18) Nanakianism, though emphasizing universal welfare, differs radically from the current mode of Welfare i.e. the welfare state. True welfare, on an universal scale, cannot be imposed externally but only achieved via the internal transformation of an individual; (19) for this particular reason, Miri-Piri does not correspond with the welfare state. The communist state, seemingly flawless in theory, posits the supremacy of the state vis-a-vis the individual and the latter’s loyalty. Speaking historically, communist states have continually followed a generic trend: 1.) The notions of equality and fairness are translated into the daily economic life of the proletariat. 2.) Complications arise and a governing group arises which captures power. 3.) Eventually falling to corruption, the communist government assumes the mantle of the state and vice versa. 4.) The state-cum-government being the sole master of all economy, all dissent is brutally suppressed. Akin to any other political model, the individual is sacrificed for the good of the government. (20) Owing to it’s swift and logical devolution towards totalitarianism, communism by no means can coexist with Miri-Piri. The modern democratic state, laudable for it’s constitutional principles, is anathema to Miri-Piri as it represents a centralized form of political supremacy i.e. a ‘one man, one vote’ (21) system of governance. Though paying lip service to the rights of minorities, the modern democratic state annuls their very existence by cutting down on their representation vis-a-vis political administration. The recent history of the Sikhs, in independent India, reflects the inherent failings of modern democracy in toto. Outnumbered, the minority is often forcefully subsumed by a bellicose majority with democratic institutions often acting as legal ratifiers of the latter course of action. Owing to it’s basis in the Sikh faith, it is often assumed (mistakenly) that Miri-Piri envisions a theocratic state along the lines of the Islamic caliphate etc. The theocratic state, or political theophany, promulgates the unity of religion as being a prerequisite for the unity and continuity of the state. This unity is achieved on the basis of the motto, cuius regis eius religio or let my ruler’s faith be my faith. (22) Simultaneously, theocracy also emphasizes the salvation of the subject’s soul as it is believed that the true purpose of all political activity is to be found in the next world and not this one. (23) Nanakianism perceives this world as being real thus opposing the very basis of theocracy. Secondly, it does not permit the implementation of cuius regis eius religio as it believes in the freedom of conscience out of which arises an individual’s civic power. The relentless rebellion which the Sikh launched against the Indo-Islamic/Hindu polity, thus, was essentially an attempt at effacing political theophany and undoing the tyranny of the theocratic state. Miri-Piri, if it is to be summarized appositely, emphasizes the socio-spiritual freedom of the individual which is constantly in danger of being suppressed by the state. The Sikh aphorism, baagi or badshah; rebel or ruler is essentially the faith’s answer to all such states who coerce the individual into a subtle slavery of sorts vis-a-vis the continuation of power and the extinction of all non-conformity. A proud people, the Sikhs have rarely tolerated state encroachment on their rights. The maxim Raaj Karega Khalsa not only sums up their principle of dual sovereignty but also acknowledges the prime role which polity plays in the day-to-day life of individuals. As such, any atrophy in the political paradigm can only be arraigned if the individual recognizes his true worth; this is why, then, the Sikhs have continually been a thorn in the sides of all powers who have ever had the misfortune to cross swords with them. Sources: (1) Sri Gur Panth Prakash, vol. i, S. Gurtej Singh (2015); pg. xx-xxi. (2) ASGGS, referenced in Political Attitude of Guru Nanak, Balwant Singh Dhillon; quoted in Journal of Sikh Studies. (3) ASGGS; quoted by Macauliffe, vol. i, pg. 232. (4) Martyrdom in Sikhism, Institute of Sikh Studies (2004); edited by Dr. Kharak Singh, pg. 61-paper presented by Brig-Gen. (retd) Hardit Singh. (5) Singh K; Theo-political Status of Sri Darbar Sahib. Article accessed from Sikhsiyasat.net. (6) Deutsches Staatstecht, vol. i, sec 16; referenced by Singh K in Theo-political Status of Sri Darbar Sahib. (7) Ibid. (8) Zafarnamah, Sri Dasam Granth Sahib. (9) See Singh K; Theo-political Status of Sri Darbar Sahib. (10) Ibid. (11) Ibid. (12) Habib I; Guru Gobind Singh and the Sikhs of the Khalsa: Reports from Bahadur Shah’s Court, 1707-1710.’ (13) Though different historians provide different transliterations, the essence is virtually the same- the Khalsa rules supreme in both the spiritual and temporal realms as represented by the cauldron (charity/spiritualism) and temporality as represented by the sword. (14) Sri Gur Panth Prakash, vol. ii, transliterated by Gurtej Singh, pg. 921. (15) Singh K; Sikhism for the Modern Man, pg. 74-75. (16) Ibid. (17) Ibid, pg. 76. (18) Accessed from http://www2.idehist.uu.se/distans/ilmh/Ren/flor-mach-aristotle-tyrant.htm (19) Sikhism for the Modern Man, pg. 75-76. (20) Ibid. (21) Ibid, pg. 78. (22) Ibid. (23) Ibid. Accessed from: https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/of-miri-and-piri/
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