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Found 21 results

  1. Been told the so called 'asian' network could hold a debate on the birmingham Visakhi mela, where there flags with ak47 with khalistan Zindabad slogans
  2. Is this a repeat of the 80s and 90s, attacks on sikhs ignored to appease political correctness by the BBC.Or political censorship by the government to stop negative stories influencing the exit Eu referendum vote
  3. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-35563415 Why are some Sikh women now wearing the turban? By Rajeev GuptaHeart and Soul, BBC World Service 8 hours ago From the sectionMagazine Devinder and her daughter Har-Rai The turban is worn by millions of Sikhs - traditionally, mostly male ones. Now many Sikh women are donning it, too. Why? "Doing this has helped me stay grounded and focused on what my responsibilities are as a human being." Devinder is in her early 40s. She's a slender, tall British-Indian Sikh woman. She works as a teaching assistant at her local school in Ilford, north-east London. You can't help but notice that she wears a turban, or what's commonly known within Sikhism as a dastar. The turban is the one thing that identifies a Sikh more than any other symbol of their faith. An edict handed down in 1699 by the 10th Sikh Guru, Gobind Singh, requires Sikhs to not cut their hair. The turban, part of the Bana or military uniform at that time, was used to help keep the long hair and protect a Sikh's head. However, in line with its military tradition, it's something that has always been a masculine symbol and almost exclusively worn by men, not women. That is until now, it seems. "I wasn't always like this," says Devinder holding up a photo album of her younger years. "I used to have cut black curls, wear makeup - go out and do what people do on nights out… but it never sat comfortably with me even then." Seven years ago Devinder decided to become fully baptised into the Sikh faith. She stopped cutting her hair, and began wearing a tall white wrapped turban. "People told me I shouldn't do it and that it will hold me back. The elders felt it's something that Sikh women didn't do. But wearing my turban, I feel free and it pushes me forwards to be the best I can be every day." As well as wearing the turban, Devinder lets her facial and bodily hair grow naturally as well. It's something she speaks confidently about. Image copyrightGetty Images Sikh women have more traditionally worn headscarves"Asian women are naturally hairy so it was difficult to let go at first and let go of the expectations society places upon what a woman should look like," she says. "But letting it go was so empowering. It's a way of saying this is who I am, this is how God made me and putting that above what society expects of me." It impossible to know exactly how many Sikh women are now wearing the turban, but at a time when some Sikh men are deciding to cut their hair, Devinder is among a growing number of Sikh women deciding to wear one. Doris Jakobs, professor in religious studies at Waterloo University in Canada, has done some of the most in-depth research in this area. She says that women tying turbans are mostly Sikhs living outside of their traditional homeland of the Punjab in India. "This is something that the younger generation in the diaspora are doing. It's a sign of religiosity in which some Sikh women are no longer content with just wearing a chuni (headscarf). Wearing a turban is so clearly identifiable with being Sikh and so women now also want that clear visual sign that they are also Sikh as well. It's a play on the egalitarian principle of Sikhism." Post-9/11, many Sikhs faced discrimination and have even been attacked after being mistaken for Muslims. Some in the community say have turned to the turban as they feel it helps give them an individual identity. Sikhism at a glance Image copyrightGetty ImagesSikhism is a monotheistic religion, founded in the 16th Century in the Punjab by Guru Nanak and is based on his teachings, and those of the nine gurus who followed him The Sikh scripture is the Guru Granth Sahib, a book that Sikhs consider a living Guru There are 20 million Sikhs in the world, most of whom live in the Punjab province of India. The 2011 census recorded 432,000 Sikhs in the UK Jasjit Singh, a research fellow at Leeds University, has spent the last few years interviewing women who have begun to wear the turban. He says there are many reasons why they are doing it. "Some say it helps with meditation and others say its part of a Sikh's uniform," he says. "I found that many young girls see this as a way of reclaiming equality within the religion. The Punjabi community is still very patriarchal but these girls tell me that Guru gave a uniform to all Sikhs - and so why shouldn't they wear the turban as well." The idea is an interesting one. Some might find it curious that, in order to seek equality, a woman might dress like a traditional Sikh man. But others argue a woman wearing a turban is a sign of empowerment. Sarabjoth Kaur, 25, from Manchester, is one of them. She began wearing a turban two years ago. She appears draped in royal blue robes with a matching tightly wrapped turban. It has a metal shaster, a type of ancient Vedic weapon wedged into the front. Sarabjoth, a former bhangra dancer, says her faith became stronger after she witnessed devout white Sikhs wearing the turban whilst worshipping in India. She strongly defends the right for women to wear the turban. Image caption Sarubjoth Kaur (right) with Heart And Soul presenter Nikki Bedi"People in my family weren't comfortable with it. They thought it would be difficult to get a job or how would I find a good husband," she says. "Before we had to change to fit in with British society. "Sikh women are meant to be strong. They're still khalsa (saint soldiers of the Guru) and the Kkhalsa isn't differentiated on gender. When I tie my turban every morning I want to see my Guru. I feel a great sense of pride when I see my reflection as I think this is what my Guru looked like, this is what the khalsa looks like." You can hear the full report on Sikh women and the turban on BBC Radio World Service's Heart and Soul programme, 09:30 GMT on Sunday 14 February - or catch up on BBC iPlayer Radio
  4. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-34664627 https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153101419237791&substory_index=0&id=240716567790
  5. Saw this on social media. Don't know how true it is but goes to show how far the Indian establishment and British establishment work very closely together to put on fake religious people in mainstream media to attack and belittle minority groups such as the Sikhs.
  6. Children in Need https://instagr.in/p/1081968845737359606_1545688517
  7. Bbc Consultation

    Wjkk Wjkk As the sangat may be aware the BBC is running a consultation regarding its future. In particular this is an opportunity for sikhs to use this to express their displeasure regarding anti -sikh programmes like the nihal show on BBC Asian network and anti -sikh bias in the news such as lack of coverage of the hunger strike by bhapu surat singh and human rights abuses in India. Here is the link http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbctrust/have_your_say
  8. What does it mean to be a Sikh? 11-year-old Simran explains her religion of Sikhism and young brothers Taran and Joven take the life-changing decision to join the Khalsa. http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b05p6t8s/my-life-my-religion-3-sikhism#long-description First Shown : 5am, 26 March 2015 Length : 30 minutes BBC iPlayer TV programmes are available to play in the UK only. Video is available only for 29 Days
  9. On the 27th of jan, the bbc asian network invited amitabh bachchan for an interview/show whatever it was. Some time in december early jan, the public could book tickets to be a part of the audience. Did anyone from here go? Bachchan has some serious allegations against him as well as a court case pending in New York regarding his role in the 84 genocide. Namely, inciting genocide on door darshan with slogons of "khoon ka badla khoon". As far as im aware, 4/5 years back sajjan kumar was refused entry into the UK because of his alleged involvement in the genocide. So why is this case any different? Is it because we made a big deal of it back then, contacted our mps etc and therefore the gov under pressure refused him entry? Should we be doing something about this? Complaining to the bbc/ gov/ whoever? I've sent a complaint to the bbc, pretty straight forward simple enough to do. Follow: https://ssl.bbc.co.uk/complaints/forms/?reset=#anchor What are your thoughts?
  10. Yesterday on the so called Asian network work nihal made a statement He said a women while on her period can't touch Shri Guru Granth Sahib. Can someone confirm if this is true.
  11. It preaches help for the poor and loving thy neighbour but now a new study has provided evidence that religion can make people more generous in their everyday lives. Research commissioned by the BBC found that people who profess a religious belief are significantly more likely to give to charity than non-believers. Sikhs and Jews emerged as the most likely to share their worldly goods with a good cause, just ahead of Christians, Hindus and Muslims. The study, carried out for the BBC's network of local radio stations, included polling by ComRes of a sample of more than 3,000 people of all faiths and none. It found that levels of generosity across the British public are strikingly high, but highest among those with a religious faith. Overall as many as seven in 10 people in England said they had given money to a charity in the past month. But while just over two thirds of those who professed no religious faith claimed to have done so, among believers the figure rose to almost eight out of 10. Among those polled, all of the Sikhs and 82 per cent of practising Jews had given money in the past month. Among practising Christians the figure was 78 per cent. The Revd Dr Martyn Atkins, general Secretary of the Methodist Church, said: Religious faith should motivate people to acts of generosity and its good to see this reflected in these figures. Of course, financial giving is only part of the picture. For some people a simple act of kindness, or the very fact that someone has made time for them, can mean more than any financial gift. "But every act of generosity, however small, bears witness to a generous and loving God and helps to change the world for good. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/10885180/Religion-makes-people-more-generous.html
  12. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-26252797 The government in India's Tamil Nadu state has decided to free seven people convicted of plotting the assassination of former PM Rajiv Gandhi. All seven were members of the Sri Lankan Tamil Tiger rebel group. Gandhi's murder in May 1991 was seen as retaliation for his having sent Indian peacekeepers to Sri Lanka in 1987. The announcement came a day after the Supreme Court commuted the death sentences of three convicts, citing delays in deciding their mercy pleas. The decision to free the prisoners was taken on Wednesday morning at a cabinet meeting, chaired by Tamil Nadu Chief Minister J Jayalalitha. Ms Jayalalitha told the state assembly later that the government would send the cabinet decision to the federal government for approval. "If there is no reply within three days from the centre, the state government will release all the seven... in accordance with the powers vested with the state government," she said. Among the prisoners to be released are the three men whose death sentences were commuted on Tuesday by the Supreme Court - Murugan, Santhan and Perarivalan. They have been in jail for more than 20 years and had been on death row since 1998. The court ruled that they should be spared the death sentence as it was inhumane to keep them for so long under the threat of execution. Nalini Sriharan, an Indian Tamil woman, was also given the death penalty by the trial court in 1998, but the Supreme Court commuted this to life imprisonment the following year. Three other convicts - Robert Pious, Jayakumar and Ravichandran - who are serving life sentences for involvement in the assassination would also be among those freed, authorities said. Rajiv Gandhi was killed by a female suicide bomber at an election rally in Tamil Nadu. A BBC correspondent in Delhi says the Gandhi family is unlikely to oppose the move to free the prisoners. Nalini's death sentence was changed into a life term, following a plea for clemency by Rajiv Gandhi's widow and Congress party president, Sonia Gandhi. Mrs Gandhi had appealed on Nalini's behalf because she had a young child. In 2008, Gandhi's daughter Priyanka Gandhi met Nalini in jail. "I needed to make peace with all the violence in my life," she later said. "I don't believe in anger or violence and I refuse to let it overpower me. Meeting Nalini was my way of coming to terms with my father's death," Ms Gandhi said
  13. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Ji This subject is being separated from the main topic "** Tom Watson Uk Member Of Parliament Reveals Biggest Secret: Britain Involved In 1984 Army Attack On Darbar Sahib" to specifically deal with false descriptions of Sikhs and the subversive propaganda against Sikhs. In a BBC news article today; http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-25723875 The BBC have stated; "The storming of the Golden Temple was aimed at flushing out Sikh separatists." "The Sikh separatists demanded an independent homeland - called Khalistan - in Punjab." "1982: Armed Sikh militants, led by Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, take up residence in the Golden Temple complex" In 1984 the BBC were labelling Sikhs as "extremists". The usage behind such propaganda against Sikhs has justified the Sikh holocaust and genocide. We encourage all people to complain against false media descriptions against Sikhs, starting with the BBC. This will only take a few minutes and can be done here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/complain-online/ and click on "Make a complaint" Have you read our page 'What happens to your complaint'? Yes Which service is your complaint about? BBC News (TV, Radio, Online) What is your complaint about? BBC News Online What is the URL of the relevant BBC News web page? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-25723875 What is the best category to describe your complaint? Factual error or inaccuracy Have you contacted us before about this complaint? No What is the subject of your complaint? Incorrect/ false labelling of Sikhs Full details of complaint: The BBC have incorrectly and falsely labelled Sikhs as 'separatists' who 'demanded an independent homeland - called Khalistan' and termed Sikhs 'militants' who took residence in the Golden Temple complex. The usage behind such propaganda against Sikhs has justified the Sikh holocaust and genocide. These claims are false, unsubstantiated and should be withdrawn with a full apology. Do you want to receive a reply? Yes Apart from Sikh media coverage issues, please comment on the main thread.
  14. Bbc Tv "inside Out" & Other Media Updates

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Guru Roop, Sadh Sangat jee, We would like to inform you of the following: 1. Today's Times Newspaper (Saturday 31/08/2013) will cover the work of sewadars against grooming. ******************************************************************************************************************* 2. This Sunday: Sikh Ethics Special with SAS Recorded at BBC London with Producer Chris Rogers on the topic of grooming. Sunday 1st September 2013 at 9PM. Sky Channel 840, online www.sikhchannel.tv http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qgk_gW4A6Io************************************************************************************************************************* 3. Monday 2nd September 7.30pm BBC "Inside Out" Show, London SPECIAL. Played on Normal BBC1 in London area and all other areas on Sky 954 An Inside Out London special, uncovers the hidden scandal of sexual grooming of young Sikh girls. Breaking their silence, they speak to Chris Rogers about their experiences at the hands of these predatory men and why justice is being denied to them by their own community and the police. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b039kmx6 Thank you for your support, In Seva of the Sangat, Sikh Awareness Society (SAS)
  15. This guy Param Singh doesn't stop! Still doing media interviews and biggin himself up after appearing on Take Me Out. He was on BBC WM last night ... this time he flapped after being questioned by Jay Singh-Sohal the author of the new "Turbanology: Guide to Sikh Identity" book. Check it out - SCROLL TO 1:14 ON SHOW PARAM SINGH FROM TAKE ME OUT MUST LISTEN TO INTERVIEW http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p012t626
  16. more anti Sikh stuff from bbc

    Getting info there doing a programme 830 bbc2
  17. http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01g86qm/Our_World_No_Mans_Land/
  18. Sikh community leader Hans Singh dies aged 87Original Link http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-20881472 Hans Singh campaigned for the rights of Scottish Sikhs. Scottish Sikh community leader Hans Singh has died at the age of 87. Mr Singh, from Glasgow, was a major force behind the opening of the country's first Sikh temple. He also successfully campaigned for Sikhs to be exempt from having to wear motorcycle helmets while they were wearing a turban. Mr Singh, who is survived by his wife Parsin Kaur and three of their four children, died peacefully on Christmas Day. A mathematics graduate from the Punjab University Lahore, he and his wife settled in Glasgow in 1948 after emigrating from Armritsar in India. He was a prominent figure within the Sikh community, and was secretary of the Guru Granth Sahib Gurdwara in Nithsdale Road for 15 years. During that time Mr Singh campaigned on issues including the right to raise the Sikh flag, the Nishan Sahib, outside temples. In 1962, he represented Glasgow Sikhs at a meeting with Indian Prime Minister Nehru during his visit to Scotland. In the 1960s and 70s, he was involved in the campaign against a ban on wearing turbans at work and while riding motorbikes. As a result, legislation was introduced which means that Sikhs who wear turbans do not need to wear crash helmets when they ride motorbikes or scooters. His son Ranbir said his father was "much loved" had been "very proud" to serve his community.
  19. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6653175.stm Mars starts using animal products Masterfoods' brands are household names Some of the UK's best-selling chocolate bars, such as Mars and Twix, will no longer be suitable for vegetarians.http://www.sikhsangat.com/Index.php?app=forums&module=post&section=post&do=new_post&f=2 Also affecting brands such as Snickers and Maltesers, owner Masterfoods said it had started to use animal product rennet to make its chocolate products. Masterfoods said the change was due to it switching the sourcing of its ingredients and the admission was a "principled decision" on its part. The Vegetarian Society said the company's move was "incomprehensible". 'Extremely disappointed' Masterfoods said it had started using rennet from 1 May and non-affected products had a "best before date" up to 1 October. Masterfoods' decision to use non-vegetarian whey is a backward step Vegetarian Society Rennet, a chemical sourced from calves' stomachs, is used in the production of whey. It will now also be found in Bounty, Minstrels and Milky Way products, and the ice cream versions of all Masterfoods' bars. "If the customer is an extremely strict vegetarian, then we are sorry the products are no longer suitable, but a less strict vegetarian should enjoy our chocolate," said Paul Goalby, corporate affairs manager for Masterfoods. The Vegetarian Society said it was "extremely disappointed". "At a time when more and more consumers are concerned about the provenance of their food, Masterfoods' decision to use non-vegetarian whey is a backward step," it said in a statement. "Mars products are very popular with young people and many will be shocked to discover that their manufacture now relies on the extraction of rennet from the stomach lining of young calves," it added.
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