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  1. SALE ORGANISER Balbir Kaur TYPE OF SALE Community Group WHAT'S HAPPENING There will be plenty of food, drinks, (non alcoholic),cultural items pertaining to the Indian sub continent. bric a brac sale WHERE AND WHEN Saturday, 21st of October 2017 Trading from: 10:00am to 03:00pm 10 Mount Barker Rd, Glen Osmond SA 5064, Australia https://www.garagesaletrail.com.au/group-sale/sikh-society-sa
  2. I think we are getting more and more evidence that child sexual abuse has been an endemic and longstanding practice in Britain. I think that we should also try and understand the issues that Sikhs are having with grooming in this light too. Have such practices against vulnerable children been a long standing, unspoken of norm in British society since before our arrival here? Man sent as child from UK to Australia tells abuse inquiry: name the villains Chair Alexis Jay asked to name and shame perpetrators of abuse of British children shipped abroad from 1947 to the 1970s Child migrants picking peas at the Fairbridge farm school in Molong, New South Wales. Photograph: National Archives of Australia The national child abuse inquiry has been urged at the opening of its public evidence sessions to name and shame the perpetrators of the sexual abuse of tens of thousands of British children forcibly deported to Australia by the UK government and leading churches and charities. David Hill, one of more than 4,000 children who were sent to Australia and other Commonwealth nations from 1947 to the 1970s, waived his anonymity at the opening of the independent inquiry on Monday to make an emotional call for justice for victims. Hill is one of 22 former child migrants who will give evidence at the hearing. Many will testify of the extreme sexual and physical abuse they experienced when they were sent to Australia as part of the child migrant programme. He told the chair, Alexis Jay: “We will never be able to undo the wrongdoing to these children. But what is important to survivors of sexual abuse is where the inquiry is satisfied with the evidence, name the villains. “Many of them are beyond the grave, but it would bring a great deal of comfort to the people who as children were their victims if they were named and shamed.” Hill appeared in the inquiry hearing room in central London with another child migrant who has given up his right to anonymity, Oliver Cosgrove. Cosgrove was deported by the British state at the age of four. His lawyer, Imran Khan, said there would be no defence for institutions to say it had taken place a long time ago. “When was it that the physical, emotional and sexual abuse of children was OK? Not now, not then, not ever.” Other survivors were seated in the public gallery at the start of a nine-day hearing dominated by the voices of people sexually abused from as young as two and three years old, after the British government sent them away from their parents into domestic and labour servitude in Australia and other Commonwealth countries. Henrietta Hill, QC, counsel to the inquiry, said it was the first time the sexual abuse of the former child migrants had been investigated in a public forum in the UK. She said the focus of the investigation was from 1947 onwards when more than 4,000 children were sent to Australia, New Zealand, Canada and southern Rhodesia. There were many reasons for child migration, she said. It was carried out by the British government and leading churches and charities including Barnardo’s, the Church of England Children’s Society, Cornwall county council and the Sisters of Nazareth. But it was not without its critics at the time, and the inquiry heard that in 1956 a blacklist of institutions was drawn up by the British government after evidence of sexual and physical abuse came to light. It was not acted upon following political pressure from many of the charities and agencies involved. The QC said cutting the cost to the taxpayer of looking after deprived children and providing white Anglo-Saxon labour for the colonies was one reason for the programme. Between the mid-19th century and the 1970s more than 100,000 children were sent to the colonies. They were taken from their parents, foster families and children’s homes, put on to ships and not told what was happening. Some who have given testimony to the inquiry said they were abused both in England before their departure and in transit to the Commonwealth, she said. “You are likely to hear very emotional accounts from former child migrants of the decades of pain their experiences have caused,” she said. Hill said one key issue the inquiry would consider was reparation and whether responses to date had been adequate. In Australia victims from the school in Molong won a settlement from the state and federal governments of more than $20m last year. But there has been no compensation paid by the UK government to the children the British state deported in such numbers. Aswini Weereratne QC, for the Child Migrant Trust which brought the issue of the forced migration of tens of thousands of UK children to light decades ago, said the 22 survivors who would give evidence had been sent from all over the country. “It remains of fundamental importance for them ... to have their experiences heard and acknowledged in England and to have the British public share their sense of sorrow and outrage,” Weereratne said. “There is no valid argument that their treatment reflected the practice of the time... This was not about voluntary migration, but about forced deportation.” She said of the one of the survivors giving evidence was five years old when they were deported from Surrey, another had been taken from Swansea and placed in Western Australia and another was taken from Cornwall and sent to New South Wales. “Many were subjected to crimes; torture, rape and slavery ... From their evidence a number of common themes emerge. They and their families were lied to, many parents were told that their children had been adopted by loving families, some children were told their parents were dead. Some have learnt after years of searching for their records that their parents tried to get them back. One foster mother campaigned to have her foster daughter returned to her from Australia.” One survivor, known as A6, believed she was deported after telling the Reverend Mother at her Catholic home about her sexual abuse there. David Hill, now 71, was born to an unmarried mother in Eastbourne, Sussex in 1946 and spent time in a Barnado’s children’s home in Essex before being shipped to Australia aged 12. His mother later found him and they were reunited. He said he was sent to Australia to be brought up by the Fairbridge farm school in Molong with his twin brother and older brother after the British government had drawn up its blacklist of institutions where there was evidence of abuse. He said he estimated 60% of children who were sent to the school were sexually abused. Hill spent years researching the abuse of child migrants at the school in Molong, New South Wales and wrote a book on the subject, The Forgotten Children. “It was endemic,” Hill said. “I hope this inquiry can promote understanding of the long-term consequences and suffering of those who were sexually abused. Many never recover.” For the government, Samantha Leek QC said: “Child migration is wrong. It should not have been sanctioned or facilitated ... The lifelong consequences for those involved are a matter of deep and sincere regret.” https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/feb/27/child-abuse-survivor-inquiry-name-villains-children-australia
  3. SOURCE: http://singhstation.net/2017/01/sikh-boy-denied-school-admission-in-australia-over-turban/ MELBOURNE – A five-year-old Sikh boy has been denied school admission in Australia for wearing patka (small turban) as it does not align with its uniform policy, despite a landmark ruling in 2008 against a private institution on the issue. “It is disappointing that my son has been forced to abandon his religious practices and identity to access to an education in Melbourne’s Melton Christian College (MCC),” Sagardeep Singh Arora was quoted as saying by the SBS Radio. “We have lodged a claim with the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission (VEOHRC).” “I believe having a common school uniform is important in promoting school identity and integration,” Arora said. “Students should be able to wear their significant religious symbols and articles of faith. It’s immoral for a school to not allow students to practice their beliefs.” “We were in discussions regarding the importance of hair & turban in Sikhism and acceptance of turban as uniform by different organisations (like schools, army, and police) in Australia and the other countries,” says Arora. “Yet, the college has refused to review their uniform policy.” Given the long history of the Sikh community in Australia, Arora says it’s disappointing that they still struggle with issues such as this. “While practising our religious beliefs, we wish to show an expression of solidarity with the wider Australian community,” he added. MCC has provided a written response to the VEOHRC in which the school refused to include any additional items amid the existing permitted uniform protocol, the report said. “Our college’s history represents over thirty years of inclusive religious tolerance. For thirty years our children have been in classrooms and playgrounds, learning, growing, and playing side by side wonderfully oblivious to their families’ extensive religious diversities. We are proud of that heritage of inclusiveness. “We acknowledge the disappointment that Sagardeep and his family feel. We respectfully recognise his disappointment that the uniform protocol of this school mean that non prescribed items are not permitted to be worn in addition to the school uniform. The result is that we have agreed that college uniform will be maintained as it is, without permitting additional items.” Sikhism is a small but growing minority religion in Australia that can trace its origins in the nation to the 1830s. Australia is home to more than 72,000 Sikh, a population that is expected to rise in this year’s census. In a landmark case in September 2008, a Brisbane private school was forced to back down on a strict uniform policy that would have forced a Sikh boy to cut his hair and remove his turban.
  4. The fact that they were on their way to visit Guru Sahib for sure played a part in them both being saved. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmldEZB__lw
  5. Sydney: Australia on Friday raised its terror threat level to high for the first time in a decade on growing concern about Australian Islamist militants returning from fighting in Iraq and Syria. The heightened alert after years on medium officially means a terrorist attack is likely and comes after repeated government warnings that attacks could happen. There are people with the intent and the capability to mount attacks here in Australia, Prime Minister Tony Abbott told a press conference. The lifting of the threat level was not based on knowledge of a specific attack plan but rather a body of evidence that points to the increased likelihood of a terrorist attack in Australia, Abbott added in a joint statement with Attorney-General George Brandis. Security and intelligence agencies are concerned about the increasing number of Australians working with, connected to, or inspired by terrorist groups such as Isil (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant), Jabhat Al Nusrah, and Al Qaida, he said. The threat they pose has been increasing for more than a year. The high alert is just below extreme the top level which would indicate a terrorist attack is imminent or has occurred. It followed a similar decision by Britain in August, which raised its terror threat risk level to severe meaning an attack is thought highly likely. Abbott said his countrys alert was now broadly comparable to the threat level in the United Kingdom. Monash Universitys Global Terrorism Research Centre director Greg Barton said the alert was last raised after the September 11, 2001 attacks and following the 2002 Bali bombings. Weve never had the alert bumped up when nothings happened when theres no incident, Barton said, adding that the current move was largely driven by developments with [isil]. The government believes up to 60 Australians are fighting alongside militants for Isil, while another 100 were actively working to support the movement at home. Abbott said based on previous experience with Australians who went to Afghanistan and Pakistan to join the Taliban, they had retained the inclination to engage in terrorist activity when they returned home. We do know that people coming back from the Middle East are militarised and brutalised, accustomed to kill without compunction, do pose a significant threat to our community should they not be under the closest possible supervision, he said. Barton said the higher alert would give authorities more resources in patrolling public locations and in sifting through intelligence about potential attacks. Given that our big concern at the moment is the targeting of soft targets, particularly something like a train station in the city... our best line of defence... is intelligence, he said. Abbott stressed the new threat level was not linked to his governments decision to support US military action in Iraq and Syria, adding: We have experienced significant levels of threats for a long time now. We would be targets regardless of anything that we did. The Australian Strategic Policy Institutes executive director Peter Jennings agreed, saying that while Australias alliance with the US might see some extra risk, it was only a result of a prolonged process of radicalisation involving significant numbers of Australians over the last few years. Brandis stressed that the decision was not targeted at Muslims. http://gulfnews.com/news/world/other-world/australia-raises-terror-alert-to-high-on-mideast-fears-1.1384303
  6. I cannot copy and paste the article but here is the full article http://singhstation.net/2014/04/turban-is-a-cultural-tradition-for-sikhs-and-has-nothing-to-do-with-religion-says-sikh-council-of-australia Brief summary: The Secretary of the SIkh Council of Australia Bawa Singh Jagdev was interviewed by writer of a News Herald on Sikhs and their identity of the turban. He goes on and states how the turban is a cultural tradition and has to do nothing with our religion. This was apparently the same Singh back in 2007 who said no to kirpans in school. Its people like him who give spread false agenda and are still given a position in the Sikh Council.
  7. AUstralian Sikhs

    I went to khalsa Camp in australia. I met alot of fellow sikhs in Aus that i have never seem before they all have no rehit maraydha. idk there all for show. i acted along with them but in heart it was upsetting. i need hardcore singhs but there is noone here i need those sangat of those singhs my age that are serious about sikhi. Idk i want to move to the UK IF THERE IS ANY AUSSIE SIKHS ON THE FOURM THAT WENT TO KHALSA CAMP SORRY BUT IF THERES ANY AUSSIES SIKHS THAT ARE HARDCORE PLEASE COMMENT I NEED YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  8. Waheguru Ji ka Khalsa waheguru Ji ki Fateh "sadgant Ji bhai Balwant singh rajuwana di saheedi Nu mukh rakde hoye sangta Wednesday Nu protest kar rahia Han canberra vickhe , jinna v sma ho ske jaroor kadan di koshih Karo Ji , bus parklea guru ghar to challe gi 5:am melbourn and sheptron sangat is coming to join as well in front of indian embessy canberra" quote from gurmatbibek.com There will be a protest on Wednesday, March 28, 2012 in Canberra in front of Indian Embassy. The Bus will start at 5 am from Gurudwara. Melbourne and Sheptron Sangat is coming. Wahegurujikakhalsa Wahegurujikifateh
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