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carin

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About carin

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    Hamray Avgun Bohuth Bohuth Hai(n)
  • Birthday 11/14/1989

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  1. Gurdwaras In New York?

    what date and time
  2. SANT SAMAGAM BY THE KALGIDHAR TRUST, BARU SAHIB (IN THE MEMORY OF SANT SHAHBEG SINGH JI) on 29th and 30th August 2006 AT GURDWARA SANT SHAHBEG SINGH, F-3, RAJOURI GARDEN, NEW DELHI -27 Programme TUESDAY, 29 AUGUST 2006 (EVE.) 7.00 to 7.30 Path Sri Rehras Sahib 7.30 to 8.00 Kirtan-Bhai Vikramjit Singh Ji, South Ex Wale 8.00 to 9.00 Kirtan-Bhai Nanak Singh Ji Preet 9.00 to 10.00 Kirtan-Bhai Manpreet Singh Ji, Kanpuri, Ludhiana Wale WEDNESDAY, 30 AUGUST 2006 (MOR.) 6.00 to 8.30 Kirtan-Asa Di War : Bhai Ranjeet Singh Ji 8.30 to 9.30 Kirtan-Bhai Sawinderpal Singh Ji, Patel Nagar, Wale 9.30 to 9.45 Bhog Sri Akhand Path Sahib Ji 9.45 to 10.15 Arti-Bhai Jaiwinder Singh Ji and Sathi Gurduwara Janam Asthan, Cheema Sahib WEDNESDAY, 30 AUGUST 2006 (EVE.) 7.00 to 7.30 Path Sri Rehras Sahib 7.30 to 8.15 Kirtan-Bhai Manmohan Singh, Gurvinder Pal Singh Ji 8.15 to 9.00 Kirtan-Bhai Hardeep Singh Ji and Sathi 9.00 to 9.15 Lecture-S. Partap Singh Ji : Jiwani Sant Sahbeg Singh Ji 9.15 to 10.15 Kirtan-Manpreet Singh Ji Kanpuri, Ludhiana Wale 10.15 Amrit Bachan-Baba Iqbal Singh JI Mukh Sewadar, Gurdwara Baru Sahib Guru Ka Langar Sadh Sangat is requested to attend the samagam and get Guru's blessings The Kalgidhar Trust BARU SAHIB Contact Delhi Office: 41005459, 25105459, 25192332 Website: www.kalgidharsociety.org ...e-Mail: delhi@kalgidharsociety.org
  3. what bump and also please put more conact on it and poster thank you so that people can know about it more
  4. aap shayi hoya, sachche da sachcha dhoya

    Baba Harbans Singh Ji Kar Sewa

    Gurudwara Bangla Sahib Delhi(India)

    http://www.panjpyare.com

  5. <H2 title="Subsection title">Sikh calendar</H2> Sikh girls at flag pole ceremony Gurdwara Sri Guru Singh Sabha, Hounslow Middlesex © The Sikh calendar is called the Nanakshahi Calendar and takes its name from Guru Nanak, who founded Sikhism. Other religions, like Christianity, Islam, Judaism and Hinduism, have long had their own calendars. But for most of its history Sikhism has used the traditional Vikrami (or Bikrami) calendar, shared by Sikhs and Hindus in North India, to set the date of its festivals. The Nanakshahi Calendar was implemented in 2003 and is seen by Sikhs as a big step forward for Sikh identity, and one that will help dispel any suggestions that Sikhism is just a variety of Hinduism. The calendar does include some controversial new celebrations: June 4 is noted as the anniversary of the attack on the Akal Takht, and June 6 as the "martyrdom" of Sant Baba Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale. It also lists as "martyrdom days" the death anniversary of the two assassins of the former Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. <H2 title="Subsection title">Benefits</H2>The new calendar makes life much easier for Sikhs as their holy days will no longer move about the calendar from year to year. Gurpurbs (celebrations devoted to particular Gurus) will now always happen on the same date, and occur once (and once only) in every year. The calendar doesn't fix the date of all Sikh festivals. Those Sikh festivals, which are celebrated at the same time as similar Hindu religious events, such as Diwali and Hola Mohalla, will still have their dates set by the Vikrami calendar. <H2 title="Subsection title">Features of the new calendar</H2> a solar calendar called Nanakshahi after Guru Nanak (founder of Sikhism) year one is the year of Guru Nanak's birth (1469 CE) uses most of the mechanics of the Western calendar year length is same as Western calendar (365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 45 seconds) contains 5 months of 31 days followed by 7 months of 30 days leap year every 4 years in which the last month (Phagun) has an extra day <H2 title="Subsection title">Calendar creator</H2>The Nanakshahi Calendar was developed by a Canadian Sikh, Pal Singh Purewal, a retired computer engineer. He started work on the new calendar in the 1960s. Purewal believes that having a unique calendar is vital for the integrity of the Sikh religion. All communities and faiths have their own calendar as a mark of their distinct cultural identity. Just as the Islamic world has the Hijri calendar and Hindus have Vikrami calendar, the Sikhs will have a Nanakshahi calendar along with the common era (CE) calendar which is in use throughout the world. Pal Singh Purewal <H2 title="Subsection title">Political history of the calendar</H2>The implementation of the new calendar was approved unanimously by leading Sikh organisations in March 2003. This was a great improvement on the first attempt to introduce the Nanakshahi calendar in 1999, when the calendar was introduced and then almost immediately banned. The two institutions that rule Sikhism were on opposite sides. The Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee or SGPC (the top Sikh religious institution) implemented the Nanakshahi calendar in December 1999, despite an order from the Akal Takht (the other top religious and legal institution in Sikhism) that the calendar should not be implemented until a general consensus emerged on the issue within the Sikh community. The SGPC decided that an important festival should be celebrated on January 5, the date given by the new calendar, while the Akal Takht insisted that the it should be on January 14, the date in the traditional calendar. The showdown resulted in temporary victory for the Akal Takht. The SGPC backed down, senior SGPC officials suffered various religious punishments, and a top SGPC official was excommunicated. Ordinary Sikhs were left in utter confusion and for the next few years some followed the lunar calendar (Vikrami or Bikrami) while others used the solar calendar (Nanakshahi). Now the controversy should be over. <H2 title="Subsection title">Calendar rights and wrongs</H2>The arguments aren't just about scientific issues concerning the accuracy of the calendar but about the identity and status of Sikhism and the Sikh community within Hindu-majority India. The Holy Golden Temple, Amritsar © Traditional Sikhs opposed the change because it broke with the past, but Sikh radicals supported it because it gives Sikhs their own calendar and emphasised their separate identity from Hindus. Some people pointed out that most religions base their calendars on the movements of the moon, and not that of the sun, that this was somehow more spiritual, and so a Sikh religious calendar should also follow the moon. Others argued that the new calendar wasn't really Sikh at all, but was just a "solarised" version of the Hindu calendar or a version of the Western calendar with added Sikh elements. Some politicians pointed out that the old Vikrami calendar, and the sharing of some Hindu and Sikh festivals, was one of the few elements of Punjab culture that had survived the growing breakdown between the Sikh and Hindu communities in North India. But other politicians, anxious to establish the separateness of the Sikh community, supported the new calendar as another pillar of Sikh identity. Moderate Sikhs were anxious about anything that might cause trouble between Sikhs and Hindus in the hothouse atmosphere of Indian communal relations, particularly in the Sikh heartland of the Punjab.
  6. Sikhism was born in the Punjab area of South Asia, which now falls into the present day states of India and Pakistan. The main religions of the area at the time were Hinduism and Islam. The Sikh faith began around 1500 CE, when Guru Nanak began teaching a faith that was quite distinct from Hinduism and Islam. Guru Nanak © Nine Gurus followed Nanak and developed the Sikh faith and community over the next centuries. <H2 title="Subsection title">Militarisation of the Sikhs</H2>Sikhism was well established by the time of Guru Arjan, the fifth Guru. Guru Arjan completed the establishment of Amritsar as the capital of the Sikh world, and compiled the first authorised book of Sikh scripture, the Adi Granth. However, during Arjan's time Sikhism was seen as a threat by the state and Guru Arjan was eventually executed for his faith in 1606. The sixth Guru, Hargobind, started to militarise the community so that they would be able to resist any oppression. The Sikhs fought a number of battles to preserve their faith. The Sikhs then lived in relative peace with the political rulers until the time of the Moghal Emperor, Aurangzeb, who used force to make his subjects accept Islam. Aurangzeb had the ninth Guru, Tegh Bahadur, arrested and executed in 1675. <H2 title="Subsection title">The Khalsa </H2>The tenth Guru, Gobind Singh, recreated the Sikhs as a military group of men and women called the Khalsa in 1699, with the intention that the Sikhs should for ever be able to defend their faith. Gobind Singh established the Sikh rite of initiation (called khandey di pahul) and the 5 Ks which give Sikhs their unique appearance. Gobind Singh was the last human Guru. Sikhs now treat their scriptures as their Guru. <H2 title="Subsection title">After the Gurus</H2> Banda Singh Bahadur © The first military leader of the Sikhs to follow the Gurus was Banda Singh Bahadur. He led a successful campaign against the Moghals until he was captured and executed in 1716. In the middle of the century the Sikhs rose up again, and over the next 50 years took over more and more territory. In 1799 Ranjit Singh captured Lahore, and in 1801 established the Punjab as an independent state, with himself as Maharaja. Ranjit Singh established the Punjab as an independent state © He proved an adept ruler of a state in which Sikhs were still in a minority. Although a devout Sikh, he took part in religious acts with Muslims and Hindus as well. <H2 title="Subsection title">Defeated by the British</H2>After Ranjit Singh died in 1839 the Sikh state crumbled, damaged by vicious internal battles for the leadership. In 1845/6 troops of the British Empire defeated the Sikh armies, and took over much Sikh territory. The Sikhs rebelled again in 1849, and were defeated by the British, this time conclusively. <H2 title="Subsection title">The Sikhs and the British Raj</H2>After this final battle, the Sikhs and the British discovered they had much in common and built a good relationship. The tradition began of Sikhs serving with great distinction in the British Army. The Sikhs got on well with the British partly because they came to think of themselves less as subjects of the Raj than as partners of the British. The British helped themselves get a favourable religious spin when they took control of the Sikh religious establishment by putting their own choices in control of the Gurdwaras. Good relations between Sikhs and British came to an end in 1919 with the Amritsar massacre. <H2 title="Subsection title">1919 - the Amritsar massacre</H2>This was a shameful event in the history of British India. In April 1919 British troops commanded by General E H Dyer opened fire without warning on 10,000 people who were holding a protest meeting. The troops killed about 400 people and wounded 1,000. Dyer felt that he had been obliged to teach a moral lesson to the Punjab. Realising the damage that had been done, the British rapidly retired Dyer, but not without promoting him first. Some historians regard the Amritsar Massacre as the event that began the decline of the British Raj, by adding enormous strength to the movement for Indian independence. In October 1997, Queen Elizabeth II made the gesture of laying a wreath at the site of the massacre. <H2 title="Subsection title">Background to Amritsar - the partition of India</H2>When British India gained its independence in 1947; it was divided between India and the Islamic state of Pakistan. The Sikhs felt badly treated and reluctantly chose to join India. The Sikhs were unable to demand their own state, because there were too few of them to resist Pakistan’s claim to the Punjab. Only by siding with India were they able to keep part of the Punjab, although not before appalling loss of life in communal massacres. Sikhs lost many of their privileges, much of their land, and were deeply discontented. <H2 title="Subsection title">A state of their own</H2>The Sikh ambition for a state of their own was something that India would not concede. To do so would have allowed communalism (i.e. religious groupings) an unbreakable foothold in the politics of what was supposed to be a secular state. However, in 1966, after years of Sikh demands, India divided the Punjab into three, recreating Punjab as a state with a Sikh majority. This was not enough to stop Sikh anger at what they saw as continuing oppression and the unfair way in which they thought India had set the boundaries of the new state. They continued to demand various concessions from the Indian government. <H2 title="Subsection title">The invasion of the Golden Temple</H2>As Sikh discontent grew, the conflict gradually changed from a purely political conflict into a confrontation between Hindus and Sikhs; and then to real violence. A Sikh preacher called Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale became the leader of the most disaffected of the Sikhs. He was often portrayed as representing all Sikhs, although, actually, he did not. In 1983 Bhindranwale and his closest followers took refuge in the Golden Temple Complex at Amritsar, the most revered place in the Sikh world. The Indian government believed that the Temple was being used as a militant command post, a sanctuary for wanted criminals and as a warehouse for weapons, and resolved to take action. In June 1984 Indian troops launched 'Operation Blue Star'. They attacked the Golden Temple Complex, killing many of those inside, and seriously damaging the buildings. <H2 title="Subsection title">The assassination of Indira Gandhi</H2>This invasion of the holiest place of the Sikhs infuriated many Sikhs, even the non-militant. They saw the Indian Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi, who had ordered the invasion, as a deliberate persecutor of the Sikh faith and community. In October 1984, Indira Gandhi was assassinated by two of her Sikh bodyguards. <H2 title="Subsection title">Anti-Sikh riots</H2>Four days of anti-Sikh rioting followed in India. The government said more than 2,700 people, mostly Sikhs, were killed, while newspapers and human-rights groups put the death toll between 10,000 and 17,000. Sikhs are still resentful that action has not been taken against all those who were responsible. For several years militant Sikhs responded by killing members of the Hindu community and a number of Sikh political leaders who oppposed them. The anger and frustration dominated Sikh politics until the mid-1990s. <H2 title="Subsection title">The current position</H2>The 300th anniversary of the Sikh Khalsa in 1999 changed the Sikh community. It was covered positively and approvingly in the Indian (and world) press, which did much to restore Sikh confidence that they were appreciated for their true worth. The Punjab is presently peaceful, although in the last two or three years the rise of Hindu nationalism, and renewed claims that Sikhism is nothing more than a Hindu sect, have given Sikhs cause for alarm.
  7. The Sikh calendar is called the Nanakshahi Calendar and takes its name from Guru Nanak, who founded Sikhism. Other religions, like Christianity, Islam, Judaism and Hinduism, have long had their own calendars. But for most of its history Sikhism has used the traditional Vikrami (or Bikrami) calendar, shared by Sikhs and Hindus in North India, to set the date of its festivals. The Nanakshahi Calendar was implemented in 2003 and is seen by Sikhs as a big step forward for Sikh identity, and one that will help dispel any suggestions that Sikhism is just a variety of Hinduism. The calendar does include some controversial new celebrations: June 4 is noted as the anniversary of the attack on the Akal Takht, and June 6 as the "martyrdom" of Sant Baba Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale. It also lists as "martyrdom days" the death anniversary of the two assassins of the former Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. <H2 title="Subsection title">Benefits</H2>The new calendar makes life much easier for Sikhs as their holy days will no longer move about the calendar from year to year. Gurpurbs (celebrations devoted to particular Gurus) will now always happen on the same date, and occur once (and once only) in every year. The calendar doesn't fix the date of all Sikh festivals. Those Sikh festivals, which are celebrated at the same time as similar Hindu religious events, such as Diwali and Hola Mohalla, will still have their dates set by the Vikrami calendar. <H2 title="Subsection title">Features of the new calendar</H2> a solar calendar called Nanakshahi after Guru Nanak (founder of Sikhism) year one is the year of Guru Nanak's birth (1469 CE) uses most of the mechanics of the Western calendar year length is same as Western calendar (365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 45 seconds) contains 5 months of 31 days followed by 7 months of 30 days leap year every 4 years in which the last month (Phagun) has an extra day <H2 title="Subsection title">Calendar creator</H2>The Nanakshahi Calendar was developed by a Canadian Sikh, Pal Singh Purewal, a retired computer engineer. He started work on the new calendar in the 1960s. Purewal believes that having a unique calendar is vital for the integrity of the Sikh religion. All communities and faiths have their own calendar as a mark of their distinct cultural identity. Just as the Islamic world has the Hijri calendar and Hindus have Vikrami calendar, the Sikhs will have a Nanakshahi calendar along with the common era (CE) calendar which is in use throughout the world. Pal Singh Purewal <H2 title="Subsection title">Political history of the calendar</H2>The implementation of the new calendar was approved unanimously by leading Sikh organisations in March 2003. This was a great improvement on the first attempt to introduce the Nanakshahi calendar in 1999, when the calendar was introduced and then almost immediately banned. The two institutions that rule Sikhism were on opposite sides. The Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee or SGPC (the top Sikh religious institution) implemented the Nanakshahi calendar in December 1999, despite an order from the Akal Takht (the other top religious and legal institution in Sikhism) that the calendar should not be implemented until a general consensus emerged on the issue within the Sikh community. The SGPC decided that an important festival should be celebrated on January 5, the date given by the new calendar, while the Akal Takht insisted that the it should be on January 14, the date in the traditional calendar. The showdown resulted in temporary victory for the Akal Takht. The SGPC backed down, senior SGPC officials suffered various religious punishments, and a top SGPC official was excommunicated. Ordinary Sikhs were left in utter confusion and for the next few years some followed the lunar calendar (Vikrami or Bikrami) while others used the solar calendar (Nanakshahi). Now the controversy should be over. <H2 title="Subsection title">Calendar rights and wrongs</H2>The arguments aren't just about scientific issues concerning the accuracy of the calendar but about the identity and status of Sikhism and the Sikh community within Hindu-majority India. The Holy Golden Temple, Amritsar © Traditional Sikhs opposed the change because it broke with the past, but Sikh radicals supported it because it gives Sikhs their own calendar and emphasised their separate identity from Hindus. Some people pointed out that most religions base their calendars on the movements of the moon, and not that of the sun, that this was somehow more spiritual, and so a Sikh religious calendar should also follow the moon. Others argued that the new calendar wasn't really Sikh at all, but was just a "solarised" version of the Hindu calendar or a version of the Western calendar with added Sikh elements. Some politicians pointed out that the old Vikrami calendar, and the sharing of some Hindu and Sikh festivals, was one of the few elements of Punjab culture that had survived the growing breakdown between the Sikh and Hindu communities in North India. But other politicians, anxious to establish the separateness of the Sikh community, supported the new calendar as another pillar of Sikh identity. Moderate Sikhs were anxious about anything that might cause trouble between Sikhs and Hindus in the hothouse atmosphere of Indian communal relations, particularly in the Sikh heartland of the Punjab.
  8. Origins Maharajah Duleep Singh © Most of Britain's Sikhs have their origins in immigration either from the Punjab in Northwest India in the 1950s and 60s, or from East Africa slightly later. The first recorded Sikh settler in Britain was Maharajah Duleep Singh. The first settler - The first recorded Sikh settler in Britain was Maharajah Duleep Singh. Duleep Singh was the last ruler of the Sikh kingdom of Punjab. The Maharajah was dethroned after six years' rule, and exiled to Britain in 1849 at the age of 14, after the Anglo-Sikh wars. There is a statue to the Maharajah at Butten Island, Thetford, Norfolk, near the Elveden Estate where he lived in Britain. The statue was unveiled by the Prince of Wales in 1999. Despite the early arrival of the Maharajah, the first Sikh Gurdwara (temple) was not established until 1911, at Putney in London. The main immigration of the Sikhs - The first Sikh migration came in the 1950s. It was mostly of men from the Punjab seeking work in British industry, which had a shortage of unskilled labour. Most of the new arrivals worked in industries like foundries and textiles. These new arrivals mostly settled in London, Birmingham and West Yorkshire. The first batch of Sikh migrants usually removed the outward religious symbols (turban, hair and beard) as racist prejudice in Britain would have kept them out of work. Why did they leave the Punjab? People wanted to leave the Punjab not just because there was a shortage of industrial and agricultural jobs, but also because of the chaotic aftermath of the 1947 division of "British" India into the secular but largely Hindu state of India and the Muslim state of Pakistan. The frontier between India and Pakistan ran through the Sikh homeland of the Punjab. There was bloodshed and destruction as millions of Muslims, Hindus and Sikhs tried to cross the border to the safety of their own communities. The Punjab changed from a settled and prosperous area to a violent and overcrowded frontier zone. Many Sikhs left the area that was to become Pakistan to move to the Indian section of the Punjab, while others left India altogether. The Punjab was disrupted again in 1966, when India further subdivided it into 3 parts, with the creation of the states of Punjab, Haryana, and Himachal Pradesh. Immigration from East Africa - The migration from East Africa was the result of the move to Africanise countries like Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya, depriving many Asians of their work, and in many cases expelling them altogether. The Sikhs from East Africa took a robust attitude to the outward symbols of Sikhism and continued to wear them. Since they had been living as an expatriate community in Africa for over 70 years they were accustomed to being a highly visible minority.They also had the further advantage of usually being highly skilled and employable, in contrast to the humble labourers from the Punjab. The presence of a group of Sikhs who radiated pride in being members of the Khalsa encouraged those who had weakened to return to the 5Ks. This strengthened the identity and the visibility of the British Sikhs as a whole. Numbers today - The 2001 census recorded 336,000 Sikhs living in Britain today. GurpurbsFind this year's dates in the multifaith calendar Gurpurbs are festivals that are associated with the lives of the Gurus. They are happy occasions which are celebrated most enthusiastically by Sikhs. The most important Gurpurbs are: [*]The birthday of Guru Nanak, founder of Sikhism (April or November) [*]The birthday of Guru Gobind Singh, founder of the Khalsa (January) [*]The martyrdom of Guru Arjan (June) [*]The martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur (November/December) The Guru Granth Sahib is read in its entirety © Sikhs celebrate Gurpurbs with an akhand path. This is a complete and continuous reading of Sikh scripture, the Guru Granth Sahib, that takes 48 hours and finishes on the day of the festival. This is also performed in times of ceremony such as birth, death, marriage and moving into a new home. The reading is done by a team of readers, who may be professionals or family members (in the case of family rites). Each reads for two to three hours. The Akhand Path originated in India in the mid 18th century, when there were few copies of the Guru Granth Sahib. Sikhs were at war and hid in the jungles. They gathered round to hear readings from the sacred text before the text was moved on to be read to other groups of Sikhs. Gurdwaras are decorated with flowers, flags and lights, and Sikhs dress up in new or smart clothes and join together for special services. Hymns are sung from the Guru Granth Sahib, poems are recited in praise of the Gurus and there are lectures on Sikhism. Panj Piaras, representing the first initiated Sikhs, in a procession © In India and parts of Britain, there are processions where the Sikh Scripture is paraded around. Five people representing the first five members of the Khalsa (the Panj Piaras or Five Beloved Ones) head the procession carrying the Sikh flag. Musicians, singers and martial artists follow. Outside some Gudwaras, free sweets are offered to the general public, regardless of their faith. Food is important in this festival. Sikhs come together to eat special food such as Karah Parasaad, a sweet-tasting food which has been blessed and is served warm. Free meals (langars) are served at the Gudwaras. Kara - a steel bracelet © [*]Throughout history hair (kesh) has been regarded as a symbol both of holiness and strength. [*]One's hair is part of God's creation. Keeping hair uncut indicates that one is willing to accept God's gift as God intended it. [*]Uncut hair symbolizes adoption of a simple life, and denial of pride in one's appearance. [*]Not cutting one's hair is a symbol of one's wish to move beyond concerns of the body and attain spiritual maturity. [*]A Sikh should only bow his head to the Guru, and not to a barber. [*]It is a highly visible symbol of membership of the group. [*]It follows the appearance of Guru Gobind Singh, founder of the Khalsa. Sikh women are just as forbidden to cut any body hair or even trim their eyebrows, as Sikh men are forbidden to trim their beards. Before you ask: A Sikh is not allowed to cut hair from any part of the body. Kara - a steel bracelet [*]A symbol of restraint and gentility. [*]A symbol that a Sikh is linked to the Guru. [*]It acts as a reminder that a Sikh should not do anything of which the Guru would not approve. [*]A symbol of God having no beginning or end. [*]A symbol of permanent bonding to the community-being a link in the chain of Khalsa Sikhs (the word for link is 'kari'). [*]The Kara is made of steel, rather than gold or silver, because it is not an ornament. Kanga - a wooden comb - This symbolises a clean mind and body; since it keeps the uncut hair neat and tidy. It symbolises the importance of looking after the body which God has created. This does not conflict with the Sikh's aim to move beyond bodily concerns; since the body is one's vehicle for enlightenment one should care for it appropriately. Kachha - special underwear - This is a pair of breeches that must not come below the knee. It was a particularly useful garment for Sikh warriors of the 18th and 19th centuries, being very suitable for warfare when riding a horse. It's a symbol of chastity. There is no fixed style of Kirpan, the ceremonial sword © Kirpan - a ceremonial sword - There is no fixed style of Kirpan and it can be anything from a few inches to three feet long. It is kept in a sheath and can be worn over or under clothing. The Kirpan can symbolise: Spirituality The soldier part of the Soldier-Saints Defence of good Defence of the weak The struggle against injustice A metaphor for God O Sword, O Conqueror of continents, O Vanquisher of the hosts of evil, O Embellisher of the brave in the field of battle. Thy Arms are unbreakable, Thy Light refulgent, Thy Glory and Splendor dazzle like the sun. O Happiness of the holy, O Crusher of evil intent, O Subduer of sin, I seek Thy refuge. Guru Gobind Singh For a Sikh the fact that the Guru has instructed the Sikhs to wear the 5 Ks is an entirely sufficient reason, and no more need be said. The symbols have become greatly more powerful with each passing year of Sikh history. Every Sikh remembers that every Sikh warrior, saint, or martyr since 1699, and every living member of the Khalsa, is united with them in having adopted the same 5 Ks.
  9. Hi Anit,

    Sat Sari Aaal.

    Where u belong, I m live in Pak, & u, I like friendship with u, i m very happy to receive ur Comments. plz send more comments agout ur self. I m waiting ur answer & also u contact on my Email or my Cell. Plz tell me more about GuruNanak Dev ji Maharaj, Thanxxxxx (BOB)

  10. Hi Carin ji, Satnaam Shri Wahe Guru. My name is Babar 4rm Pattoki Pakistan can u makes friendship with me.reply me.00923454452355 or E.Mail:- bobguru345@yahoo.com

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